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McLaren 6 n.h.p. 10 ton

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McLaren 6 n.h.p. 10 ton - information: McLaren 6 n.h.p. 10 ton is a very good car, that was released by "McLaren" company. We collected the best 11 photos of McLaren 6 n.h.p. 10 ton on this page.

Brand Name McLaren
Model McLaren 6 n.h.p. 10 ton
Number of views 31936 views
Model's Rate 6.7 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • MAKE MINE A “SUPERMID”.

    Just as it did in 2015 with the 1299 Panigale, Ducati has upped the ante in 2016 with the smaller Panigale, giving the previous 899 the same stroke measurement as the 1299 to create the new 959 Panigale. Ducati wanted to ensure that the “supermid” Panigale kept pace with its bigger brother, so it invited the world’s motorcycling media to the Circuit de la Comunitat Valenciana Ricardo Tormo in Valencia, Spain, to let us find out. Looking at the updates, they are minimal but important, with the engine’s slight increase in stroke from 57.2mm to 60.8mm (resulting in a total displacement of 955cc) necessitating a new crankshaft and connecting rods. The piston crowns are slightly different, while strict Euro 4 noise emissions standards required the fitment of a different exhaust system with dual muffl ers on the right side (thankfully absent from US models), along with ribbing on the cylinder heads and valve covers, and a different cam chain. Exhaust diameter was increased from 55mm to 60mm, while on the intake side, the 62mm oval throttle bodies now feature dual injectors. The clutch now has the slipper/assist function from the 1299 that provides lighter lever action and smoother downshifting when riding aggressively. Meanwhile, thanks to the bike employing the same cast-aluminum monocoque two-piece frame that uses the engine as a structural member, changes on the chassis side are limited to dropping the swingarm pivot 4mm for better rear-tire grip. I had spent a couple of days on an 899 Panigale last year at Circuit of The Americas in Texas, so I had a good idea of what to compare the 959 to. It didn’t take me long to realize that the 959 has power all over the 899 regardless-and not only more of it through the rpm range but smoother power, too, with fewer dips and bumps in the powerband. Ducati claims 157 hp, an increase of 9 hp from the 899’s 148 hp at 10,500 rpm, and a torque peak of 79 foot-pounds (a massive 6 foot-pound increase over the 899) at 9,000 rpm. The same Ducati electronics suite of RbW (Ride-by-Wire), DTC (Ducati Traction Control), EBC (Engine Brake Control), DQS (Ducati Quickshift), and Bosch ABS does an excellent job of keeping everything under control. With the DTC set to Level 2 in the Race riding mode, the new 959 Panigale comes off the corners well and continues pulling hard as the rpm rises. I did find, however, that you need to exercise some care in Race mode when opening the throttle midcorner, as the 959’s increased and more responsive torque can come on a little abruptly. If anything, it’s more of an annoyance, really, and it’s very manageable; you just have to be aware of it. The Sport mode throttle response is softer (with the rain-intended Wet mode softer still) and perhaps a little too soft for the track, which is why I left it in Race mode for the majority of my laps. Setting the EBC at Level 1 (the least enginebraking) with the slipper clutch was a big help under braking, allowing the rear end to step out just enough while hammering downshifts to aid but not interfere with corner entry. And speaking of braking, the feel and control provided by the Brembo M4.32 monoblock calipers and 320mm discs were outstanding, allowing trail braking deep into the corner without issues. The fully adjustable Showa 43mm Big Piston Fork offered a very solid feel in all conditions, and while the fully adjustable Sachs rear shock performed admirably, I was wishing for a slightly stiffer spring in the back to counter some squatting under acceleration. Midcorner stability was rock-solid, and although initial turn-in at speed took some effort (a likely by-product of the rear-end squat), overall steering habits were light and agile- the 959’s 430-pound wet weight surely helping matters here. The taller and wider windscreen definitely helps keep the windblast off you down long front straights better than its comparatively skimpy predecessor. And you can move around easily on the bike, aided by the same knurled footpegs found on the 1299 that grip your boots far better than the previously useless pegs found on generations of Ducatis that were only good to rest your feet on when cruising in a straight line. All told, boosting the displacement and adding subtle tweaks to its “Supermid” superquadro engine has yielded great results with the new 959 Panigale. This is the type of bike you can really feel like you’re squeezing all the potential out of, instead of the 1299 Panigale where at times you feel like you’re only along for the ride. Yeah, calling a bike with a 955cc engine a midsize machine is a bit of a stretch, but after a ride on the 959 Panigale, you probably won’t care one bit.
  • Porsche North America Racing achieve podiums at Daytona.

    Porsche North America Racing started the 2016 WeatherTech United SportsCar Championship with a third place finish in the GTLM class at the 54th Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona. The no.912 Porsche 911 RSR of Earl Bamber, Frйdйric Makowiecki and Michael Christensen battled through an unusually attritional race to take the final step on the podium, although it was nearly so much more for the factory Porsche squad. A wet qualifying session on the Thursday, disrupted by torrential rain, saw the no.911 and no.912 Porsches lock out the front row of the grid in the hands of Nick Tandy and Makowiecki respectively. Such was the GTLM field’s dominance in the wet, the two 911 RSRs actually set the fastest times overall but, thanks to IMSA’s rules, would be forced to start behind the prototype machinery. During the race’s opening hour, Tandy (as is now becoming customary in the USCC) raced into an early lead as the no.912 dropped back into a dogfight with the works Corvettes and BMWs. By the six-hour mark, the two factory Porsches crossed the line onetwo, with the no.911 still narrowly leading. However, through the night - heavily disrupted by multiple full-course caution periods - the momentum swung toward the no. 912 RSR. By dawn, the 54th Rolex 24 had boiled down to a battle between the two Porsches and the no.3 and no.4 Corvette duo. But, with Kйvin Estre at the wheel, the no.911 slowed dramatically on the banking with around five hours to go, a broken driveshaft forcing a lengthy stop for repairs leaving the no.912 to battle on alone. Patrick Pilet would eventually re-emerge in the 2015 championship-winning entry to help it on its way to some useful points in eighth place. After the final round of stops inside the last hour, Bamber found himself once again in the class lead. However, after being hunted down by Oliver Gavin in the no.4 Corvette, the Kiwi racer was nudged out of the lead at the turn five hairpin. With around 20 minutes remaining, the second Chevrolet - in the hands of Antonio Garcia - also found a way through, this time at the Bus Stop chicane, leaving Bamber to watch on as the two Corvettes fought it out for victory. Despite coming close, the two GM cars never came to blows, as Bamber brought the no.912 machine home in third for the crew’s first podium since ViR last August.
  • DUCATI DIAVEL RED.

    Got issues? Anger management, racing crouch Tourette’s, grumpier as the days pass? Perhaps Ducati have the panacea for those ills and others in the form of the Diavel. The hulking, fat and stretched alleged cruiser from Bologna is much more than a parts bin Frankenstein. Hang on to what’s left of your soul because this devil is captivating enough to be almost anyone’s Faustian bargain. Why? Be comforted by the beckoning seat that embraces your buttocks delightfully and holds you low and squarely in genuine comfort. Find your new foot position. Fire up the Testastretta 11° engine, which was surely made in heaven and roll along on the sled-like long wheelbase chassis, monster brakes and ultra-fat rear hoop. Look mean. Sound mean. Be mean. Or be a show pony, as it matters not - the Diavel will not be fazed. I was sceptical at first, but I’m now a wild-eyed disciple. How? Let the magnificent engine do the work. From the bottom rung of the ladder to the top, it does not cease providing chunky, wieldy torque and still thirsts to be spun up - a gem of an engine that is aided with sublime fuelling and excellent throttle reaction. Diavel weight distribution, which is lardy for a duck, and a lengthy wheelbase ensures stability is a priority, however, the ergonomics and ‘bars assist in defying physics with surprisingly relaxed direction changes. Top shelf suspension is well suited, enhancing the solid geometry and includes on-the-fly rear adjustment. Stopping is a non-issue, the superbike specification brakes are truly splendid, offering a deftness of touch that is inspiring. Styling is debatable I reckon, but your call, and who cares when you can bank over enough to scrape your boots in hateful salute to the authorities and all the while the beast begs for more? Just change your style from hard braking late into bends and body slamming the bike down, to increasing the radii and rolling around that big back tyre. The demeanour of the bike, like Beelzebub himself, is misleading as it appeases the senses, relaxes and makes you chill, but will get you maniacal from the pleasures. It is definitely a faster point to point machine than it might appear. The technology, love or hate it, is there in spades and includes ride-by-wire throttle, several electronic safety systems, multi-modes to corral the Testastretta wallop and dual displays for God knows why. A mortal sin is the keyless ignition - a nonsense. Another is machine width, which kind of made it impossible to efficiently lane split. The Diavel is a new, perhaps controversial, branch on Ducati’s evolutionary tree, but a significant one. The non-compromising approach by the designers and engineers has made a sophisticated and capable machine that needs to be ridden to be properly appreciated. It will not be to everyone’s liking, but the lure of the dark side, which is now available in traditional red for the Australian market, may be the elixir for many evils. God bless the Diavel?
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