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McLaren M23 Ford

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McLaren M23 Ford - information: McLaren M23 Ford is a very good car, that was released by "McLaren" company. We collected the best 12 photos of McLaren M23 Ford on this page.

Brand Name McLaren
Model McLaren M23 Ford
Number of views 35030 views
Model's Rate 7.9 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • Mitsubishi Shogun 3.2 DI-D SG4 LWB Automatic.

    With the launch of the 2016 model year Shoguns, the model range has been slimmed down, with the manual gearbox variants axed. A new Euro-6 compliant engine arrives, but it’s disappointing to note that it is thirstier, emits more CO2 and produces less power. Fuel economy on the combined cycle is now 30.4mpg (previously 33.2mpg), CO2 emissions rise by 21 to a hefty 245g/km, while maximum power drops by 9bhp to 188bhp. Thankfully acceleration to 62mph is preserved, even if the top speed is reduced by one mph. The loss in performance is blamed on the changes necessary to get the Shogun to pass the more stringent Euro-6 emissions regulations. What hasn’t changed is its no-nonsense go-anywhere ability and class-leading 3,500kg towing weight. The cabin of the Shogun feels solid, and even employs a smattering of soft-touch plastics, but doesn’t feel plush, mainly down to outdated switchgear and buttons. The two-tone grey and beige trim looks good, but the wood trim gives a dated ambience. The driving position is upright, with seats that are comfortable, even if they lack sufficient rearward travel for taller and bulkier drivers, while the steering wheel only adjusts for rake and not reach. Thanks to enormous mirrors and deep windows, all round vision from the driver’s seat is excellent, handy when manoeuvring in tight spots or negotiating tough terrain when off-road. Headroom is generous front and back, even with the sunroof fitted, and legroom in the middle row is sufficient for even the tallest of passengers. Those wanting to use the rearmost chairs will need to be nimble, as in common with most seven-seat SUVs, you’ll need to do a fair bit of climbing. For carrying capacity, the Shogun is best in five-seat mode, where there’s a large, wide and deep area, with a relatively low loading sill. The side opening rear door is a pain in confined spaces, however. Oddment space is generally good, with a deep storage area under the armrest and a generously sized glovebox. Start the Shogun from cold and first impressions aren’t good. It takes an age for the engine to fire into life, and when it does there’s plenty of clatter. Moving away from rest there’s decent pace, albeit in a noisy fashion, and the sound never really disappears, even at motorway speeds. Most newer rivals employ smoother six-cylinder units to combat noise and deliver a smoother demeanour. But even if the engine was quieter, you’re still left with plenty of road and wind noise. Heavy, slow to react steering is a chore in car parks, but is alright at higher speeds. The tall sides of the Shogun inevitably mean some body lean when cornering, however, with excellent grip there’s rarely any drama. The suspension has clearly been setup for comfort rather than outright agility, soaking up all but the deepest of potholes and ruts nicely. So the Shogun is lagging behind the class best for on-road ability, but thanks to its selectable four-wheel-drive system, there isn’t another vehicle at this price point, with the same long list of equipment, that can touch it off-road in the rough stuff, and also in its.
  • GSX-R 1000.

    Eleven years after the launch of the GSX-R1000 K5, Suzuki finally revealed a brand-new GSX-R1000 L7 at EICMA 2015. According to the Japanese bike-makers, this new GSX-R1000 is the lightest, most powerful and best handling Gixxer they’ve ever made, which, if true, is extremely exciting since the previous Gixxer was already a very capable motorcycle. Highlights of the new GSX-R1000 include an all-new chassis, an all-new 999-cc engine with 200 PS on tap, bidirectional quickshifter, a 10-level traction control and Showa suspension. We expect the to make its way to our shores sooner or later. Are you listening, Suzuki India?
  • BIG BIKE VS. SMALL BIKE.

    We see it quite often at the racetrack, especially in club races where classes are mixed: Rider on small bike passes rider on big bike in seemingly every corner, only to be passed back right away on the next straight. Even if the power difference is not that great between the two bikes, the contrast between corner speed and straightaway speed of the two bikes becomes magnified as each bike is ridden to maximize its advantages. The reality of the situation is that the outright maximum cornering speed between any two bikes is not that significantly different, provided both are on similar tires. If the tires are similar, both bikes should be capable of the same lateral acceleration (limited by the friction coefficient of the tires) and corner speed. Why do we see such a contrast in how the bikes are ridden? On an underpowered bike, the quickest way around the track is to maximize corner speed, in turn getting onto each straight with as much speed as possible. This is accomplished by completing the corner with as large an arc as possible, which converts lateral acceleration into maximum corner speed. For a typical single-radius corner, this means entering as wide as possible to maximize entry speed, turning in to the apex with little trail- braking, and keeping the bike at maximum lean with a constant radius until the very exit of the corner. In contrast, the quickest lap times on a more powerful bike are usually found by maximizing acceleration onto each straight and taking advantage of that power; this is achieved by sacrificing some corner speed to pick the bike up and apply the throttle earlier at the exit. For that same single-radius corner, this means a tighter entry, more trail-braking to a slightly later apex, with a tighter arc and less corner speed to get the bike up off the side of the tire as quickly as possible. As we found out in our displacement test last year where we compared the Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R750, and Kawasaki ZX-10R, it’s not so much that the smaller bikes have a handling advantage over the bigger bikes but rather it’s how each bike is ridden to play to its strength or weakness in the power department. Using data from our AiM Solo GPS lap timer, we could see differences in line and cornering speeds between the three bikes, just as you would expect given the horsepower of each. While a few horsepower here or there might not seem like it should impact line choice signifi- cantly, in practice even a small difference can significantly change how a particular corner or series of corners is negotiated. And the contrast between a lightweight bike and a literbike can be astonishing: We’ve encountered certain corners where the entry line is several feet different on an SV650 than it is on a 1000, for an example. Finding the optimum line to match the power of your bike does require some experimentation. The wide radius and high corner speed that less powerful bikes require typically brings with it a higher risk of a high-side crash in the middle of the corner just as the throttle is opened, and the safer option is to start with the tighter entry and lower corner speed of the big-bike line and work from there, adding more corner speed and a wider entry with practice. If you are looking at sector times on data, don’t forget to factor in any time gained or lost on the succeeding straight, which may or may not offset time saved in the corner itself. Given the contrast in lines between different bikes, the key point to remember is that the optimum line for your bike may be very different from the bike in front of you, and it’s quite often a mistake to blindly follow another rider at the track. Even if you are riding the same model of bike, the power difference may be enough that you can take advantage of a different line to be quicker, and that line may work to a further advantage when it comes time to make a pass. When you ride at the track, what bike you are on will at least in part determine what lines you should be taking, and you should try different options with that in mind. And if you change bikes and move to a more or less powerful machine- or even make modifications to the same bike for more power-know that the lines you had been using for years might need to be altered appropriately.
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