World Encyclopedia of Cars
The best old cars, news and reviews about old cars. Stay in touch!

MG B [3/3699]

All MG Photos

MG B [3/3699] - information: MG B [3/3699] is a very good car, that was released by "MG" company. We collected the best 8 photos of MG B [3/3699] on this page.

Brand Name MG
Model MG B [3/3699]
Number of views 55419 views
Model's Rate 7.4 out of 10
Number of images 8 images
Interesting News
  • Modern throwback.

    This is the XSR900. And yes, you’re right - it’s the charismatic three-cylinder MT-09 wearing it’s dad’s flares and floppy-collared shirt. Chassis and engine are MT-09, with the 2016 updates of a slipper-assist light-action clutch and three-level traction control. For the XSR the MT’s contemporary styling is swapped for round lights, aluminium bodywork and round instruments. ‘To reflect Yamaha’s sporty DNA, its history and its iconic motorcycles of the past,’ they say. Hmm. Don’t know about all that, but the 900 pulls it off. You could predict the XSR. After retrofying the MT-07 into the XSR700 (see last issue) this larger ‘Faster Sons’ variant was a given, especially after Yamaha’s video of the ‘Faster Wasp’ MT-09 flattracker by US custom bloke Roland Sands. Let’s hope the trim on the front of his tank makes the accessory list, to give the same flat-tank profile. In other MT-related news, there’s now an MT-03. Basically a naked YZF-R3 sportsbike for A2 licence holders, with funky digi dash, LED lights and crisp lines, it’s not quite a modern LC... but looks good.
  • Ford B-MAX Tita nium 1.5 TDCi.

    While Ford has been busy replacing most of its MPV range, with all-new S-MAX and Galaxy models, as well a substantial facelift to the C-MAX, the baby B-MAX has soldiered on. It’s the only model, apart from the Ka, not to have adopted Ford’s wide mouthed, Aston Martinesque grille, though it only has to be a matter of time before a facelifted version arrives. In the meantime, Ford has replaced its 1.6-litre TDCi engine with a downsized, identically powered 1.5-litre unit that manages to be 3.7mpg more economical, with CO2 emissions that are 6g/km less and with an acceleration to 62mph time that is just under a second faster. And the price for all of these improvements, a modest Ј130. At its launch, the B-MAX won plaudits for its interesting sliding rear doors that leave a pillarless space when both front and rear doors are open. It makes loading little’uns into the child seats in the back a breeze, especially in tightly proportioned car parks. That combined with generous head and legroom both front and rear, this is one seriously spacious car, despite its modest footprint. The dashboard is attractively styled with all of the controls logically arranged, though we think it’s a shame that there are so many tiny buttons on the audio system. The optional navigation system is hindered by a small screen, albeit with excellent colourful graphics, we just wish there was more of it. Still, it’s neatly positioned just within your eye line. The dashboard materials are made out of decent plastics and feel well appointed, though it’s a disappointment that the door tops are made out of hard materials. The driving position is best described as command, with a good view out along the bonnet. In fact, all round vision is pretty good, thanks to deep windows, except for the super wide central door pillars. Boot space is smaller than most of its immediate rivals, but thanks to a low sill and wide opening, you can make good use of the available room. There’s extra underfloor storage and the seats fold down totally flat. With just 94bhp on tap, you’re not likely to win any traffic light Grand Prix, and it’s surprising that Ford doesn’t offer the more powerful 118bhp edition of this engine for extra zip. It’s a quiet unit, though, and is only really noticeable at higher revs, though at motorway speeds it’s barely audible. Besides, the sound is drowned out by the excessive road noise and fluttering of the wind around the windscreen. As you would expect from a Blue Oval-badged car, it’s the driving experience that really excels, with communicative, agile steering and while there’s some lean when cornering, on account of its tall sides, everything is kept well in check, with generous amounts of grip. But it’s the ride comfort that is at odds with the high degree of comfort that the B-MAX otherwise delivers, with a firm edge to the suspension that results in too many of the road imperfections being transmitted into the cabin. The slick, smooth five-speed manual gearbox is a delight to use and has a light clutch as a companion. Gear ratios are well thought out, allowing you to make reasonable progress even considering the modest power and size of the engine.
  • Mitsubishi Shogun 3.2 DI-D SG4 LWB Automatic.

    With the launch of the 2016 model year Shoguns, the model range has been slimmed down, with the manual gearbox variants axed. A new Euro-6 compliant engine arrives, but it’s disappointing to note that it is thirstier, emits more CO2 and produces less power. Fuel economy on the combined cycle is now 30.4mpg (previously 33.2mpg), CO2 emissions rise by 21 to a hefty 245g/km, while maximum power drops by 9bhp to 188bhp. Thankfully acceleration to 62mph is preserved, even if the top speed is reduced by one mph. The loss in performance is blamed on the changes necessary to get the Shogun to pass the more stringent Euro-6 emissions regulations. What hasn’t changed is its no-nonsense go-anywhere ability and class-leading 3,500kg towing weight. The cabin of the Shogun feels solid, and even employs a smattering of soft-touch plastics, but doesn’t feel plush, mainly down to outdated switchgear and buttons. The two-tone grey and beige trim looks good, but the wood trim gives a dated ambience. The driving position is upright, with seats that are comfortable, even if they lack sufficient rearward travel for taller and bulkier drivers, while the steering wheel only adjusts for rake and not reach. Thanks to enormous mirrors and deep windows, all round vision from the driver’s seat is excellent, handy when manoeuvring in tight spots or negotiating tough terrain when off-road. Headroom is generous front and back, even with the sunroof fitted, and legroom in the middle row is sufficient for even the tallest of passengers. Those wanting to use the rearmost chairs will need to be nimble, as in common with most seven-seat SUVs, you’ll need to do a fair bit of climbing. For carrying capacity, the Shogun is best in five-seat mode, where there’s a large, wide and deep area, with a relatively low loading sill. The side opening rear door is a pain in confined spaces, however. Oddment space is generally good, with a deep storage area under the armrest and a generously sized glovebox. Start the Shogun from cold and first impressions aren’t good. It takes an age for the engine to fire into life, and when it does there’s plenty of clatter. Moving away from rest there’s decent pace, albeit in a noisy fashion, and the sound never really disappears, even at motorway speeds. Most newer rivals employ smoother six-cylinder units to combat noise and deliver a smoother demeanour. But even if the engine was quieter, you’re still left with plenty of road and wind noise. Heavy, slow to react steering is a chore in car parks, but is alright at higher speeds. The tall sides of the Shogun inevitably mean some body lean when cornering, however, with excellent grip there’s rarely any drama. The suspension has clearly been setup for comfort rather than outright agility, soaking up all but the deepest of potholes and ruts nicely. So the Shogun is lagging behind the class best for on-road ability, but thanks to its selectable four-wheel-drive system, there isn’t another vehicle at this price point, with the same long list of equipment, that can touch it off-road in the rough stuff, and also in its.
Top MG models
Popular Searches
World Encyclopedia of Cars
Copyright 2015. All rights under protection.