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Mini Clubman S

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Mini Clubman S - information: Mini Clubman S is a very good car, that was released by "Mini" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Mini Clubman S on this page.

Brand Name Mini
Model Mini Clubman S
Number of views 37516 views
Model's Rate 6.9 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • DUCATI MULTISTRADAS.

    When I had a chance to try out the Ducati Multistrada Pikes Peak last year I was incredibly impressed, the concept of four bikes in one is bandied about quite commonly when referring to the Multistrada and is a good reflection of the bike’s abilties. The current Multistrada is a large bike with a wet weight of 235kg - relatively light all things considered. I found the seat height tall, although it is adjustable between 825 and 845mm and couldn’t get both feet flat to the ground, but balance and low speed maneuvering were both very good. Heated grips of a chilly morning are priceless and the centre-stand is a nice touch, although probably not for everyone. They are part of the Touring pack which includes heated grips, panniers and center-stand. The Multistrada S benefits from the Ducati Skyhook Suspension and also includes a few nifty additional features like full LED headlamps, including the Ducati Cornering Lights (DCL). The braking systems on the S is also an upgraded Superbike spec system, with M50 Brembo front calipers on 330mm rotors, with a dual piston Brembo rear caliper on 265mm rotor. Also standard is the Ducati Multimedia System, which uses Bluetooth to accept incoming calls, alert you to messages and control your music, when synced with your other devices, displayed via the S’s full colour TFT display. On the bike, performance from the DVT Testastretta starts low and tractor-like, with strong but controllable low end-torque, and between 4000 and 5000rpm transforms into sportsbike like drive - in fact if you want to move off in a hurry try opening that throttle wide open, it’s exhilarating. Just keep the revs up past 4000rpm where it transitions into much smoother running, with slight vibes felt through the ‘bars, but not in an annoying fashion - you’ll have all the torque you could wish for, for rapid overtaking or acceleration. You can also modify each of the riding modes for a variety of settings, where I was using the baseline settings, which means you can have each mode set up for specific conditions, whether that’s suspension, power delivery, ABS, DTC or DWC. The Skyhook Suspension was a standout and in Sport mode with one helmet (the one rider, no luggage setting) I could feel the forks providing more support during heavy braking, only to soften as I came to a stop. Through the local twisties the Skyhook suspension proved itself, with an ability to easily absorb road irregularities. Coming into corners needs more effort than your regular sportsbike, with the Multistrada obviously carrying its weight taller and taking more input to follow your chosen path. It wasn’t the sharpest on tip in, with the standard settings - but that’s something you can tweak thanks to the level of adjustability on offer. The taller bike also means you’re leaning over further, which was easy and confidence inspiring but lends itself to coming into your corners nice and wide.You can feel that you’re relying on a system of suspension that essentially has a mind of its own but as you get used to that fact and show more confidence in the bike it only gets better and better. Part of what sets the newest Skyhook Suspension (DSS) system apart is the Evo suffix, with the previous sensors now joined by the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) which is used to provide cornering ABS to the Brembo braking system with Bosch 9ME ABS unit. This means the DSS Evo system is able to take into account your lean angle when calculating the ideal suspension response. It’s high tech and the results on the road speak for themselves. I was hoping to take my wife for a ride as a pillion to get an opinion on riding two-up, but with all my testing mid-week unfortunately couldn’t make it happen. Now it’s quite possibly you’re thinking to yourself, why spend the extra $4000 on the S model, which is a fair question. The S is the obvious choice though, as the Multistrada truly is many bikes in one, with the S offering the ultimate in suspension adjustability at the click of a few buttons. It’s the future of motorcycling and Ducati’s leading the charge.
  • Suzuki SX4 S-Cross 1.6 DDiS Automatic.

    Suzuki’s SX4 S-Cross has been around for a couple of years and has earned a quiet following for blending a practical interior with a certain amount of driving flair, all at a reasonable price. What it’s never had, and no Suzuki for the last 22 years has had, is an automatic gearbox allied with a diesel engine, or at least a proper one rather than a continuously variable transmission. This combination accounts for 16 per cent of sales in the compact SUV market, so Suzuki is keen to tap in to that extra revenue stream by launching an automatic gearbox option for the existing diesel engine. The gearbox uses a twin-clutch setup to engage odd or even gears in advance, depending on whether the driver is accelerating or braking, ensuring a smooth and instantaneous shift of the next required gear. In use it operates exactly as you would expect an automatic gearbox to work, although it’s technically an automated manual system - hydraulics control the clutch and gearshift in the background, leaving you with nothing to do but play with the steering wheel mounted paddles, should you wish to take over control yourself. Systems of this nature are often a tad rough, but Suzuki’s version is remarkably smooth. Each gear is selected without fuss, and there’s no clunking through the system as the clutch is engaged. It’s not notably quick, despite the claims of instant shifting, but the short pause between ratios would only be a problem if this SUV was a more sporting proposition. Not that the S-Cross can’t handle bends. It can, and probably better than you have any right to expect, but it’s never particularly involving or rewarding. Allgrip four-wheel-drive is standard on this edition, with the electronic gadgetry splitting the power between each wheel, and allowing you to get further in tricky conditions than a conventional two-wheel-drive SUV will allow you. Driving to the top of Ben Nevis might be beyond it, due to ground clearance issues, but you’ll certainly make it home when the snow starts falling. The extra weight of the gearbox hits economy slightly, with a meagre 1.4mpg drop compared to the manual version, but the end result is a still an impressive 62.8mpg on the combined cycle. And that doesn’t appear to be an entirely unrealistic figure either, with 50+mpg in normal use being easily achievable while on test. There’s no extra weight on the inside, with disappointingly lightweight plastics making up the bland, but inoffensive dashboard. And with a long list of standard equipment included within the price, there’s not a shortage of space for the driver to enjoy all of the functions. The S-Cross feels light and airy inside, at least up front, but it gets a bit tighter for headroom in the rear. The boot is class competitive, swallowing exactly the same 430 litres of luggage as Nissan’s Qashqai, and is similarly comparable to SsangYong’s new Tivoli. The SX4 S-Cross comes loaded with equipment, offers excellent real-world economy and has the extra traction and reassurance afforded by four-wheeldrive. It might not be the most exciting model in the segment, or even the class leader, but it offers excellent value for money in a generally pleasing package.
  • 2016 BMW G 310 R.

    BMW says it wants to “take the typical BMW premium aspiration to the segment under 500cc” with its new, single-cylinder G 310 R. Developed in Munich but produced in India by TVS Motor Company (India’s third-largest motorcycle manufacturer), the G 310 R features a 313cc engine with reverse-cylinder design that has the intake facing forward and exhaust rearward, allowing the engine to fit better in a chassis with short wheelbase and longer swingarm. Aimed at newer riders, the G 310 R features a moderately low seat height of 30.9 inches and is claimed to weigh 349 pounds while making 34 hp and 21 footpounds of torque.
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