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Mitsubishi Fuso Aero Queen

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Mitsubishi Fuso Aero Queen - information: Mitsubishi Fuso Aero Queen is a very good car, that was released by "Mitsubishi Fuso" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Mitsubishi Fuso Aero Queen on this page.

Brand Name Mitsubishi Fuso
Model Mitsubishi Fuso Aero Queen
Number of views 61240 views
Model's Rate 8.2 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • DUCATI DIAVEL RED.

    Got issues? Anger management, racing crouch Tourette’s, grumpier as the days pass? Perhaps Ducati have the panacea for those ills and others in the form of the Diavel. The hulking, fat and stretched alleged cruiser from Bologna is much more than a parts bin Frankenstein. Hang on to what’s left of your soul because this devil is captivating enough to be almost anyone’s Faustian bargain. Why? Be comforted by the beckoning seat that embraces your buttocks delightfully and holds you low and squarely in genuine comfort. Find your new foot position. Fire up the Testastretta 11° engine, which was surely made in heaven and roll along on the sled-like long wheelbase chassis, monster brakes and ultra-fat rear hoop. Look mean. Sound mean. Be mean. Or be a show pony, as it matters not - the Diavel will not be fazed. I was sceptical at first, but I’m now a wild-eyed disciple. How? Let the magnificent engine do the work. From the bottom rung of the ladder to the top, it does not cease providing chunky, wieldy torque and still thirsts to be spun up - a gem of an engine that is aided with sublime fuelling and excellent throttle reaction. Diavel weight distribution, which is lardy for a duck, and a lengthy wheelbase ensures stability is a priority, however, the ergonomics and ‘bars assist in defying physics with surprisingly relaxed direction changes. Top shelf suspension is well suited, enhancing the solid geometry and includes on-the-fly rear adjustment. Stopping is a non-issue, the superbike specification brakes are truly splendid, offering a deftness of touch that is inspiring. Styling is debatable I reckon, but your call, and who cares when you can bank over enough to scrape your boots in hateful salute to the authorities and all the while the beast begs for more? Just change your style from hard braking late into bends and body slamming the bike down, to increasing the radii and rolling around that big back tyre. The demeanour of the bike, like Beelzebub himself, is misleading as it appeases the senses, relaxes and makes you chill, but will get you maniacal from the pleasures. It is definitely a faster point to point machine than it might appear. The technology, love or hate it, is there in spades and includes ride-by-wire throttle, several electronic safety systems, multi-modes to corral the Testastretta wallop and dual displays for God knows why. A mortal sin is the keyless ignition - a nonsense. Another is machine width, which kind of made it impossible to efficiently lane split. The Diavel is a new, perhaps controversial, branch on Ducati’s evolutionary tree, but a significant one. The non-compromising approach by the designers and engineers has made a sophisticated and capable machine that needs to be ridden to be properly appreciated. It will not be to everyone’s liking, but the lure of the dark side, which is now available in traditional red for the Australian market, may be the elixir for many evils. God bless the Diavel?
  • Ford B-MAX Tita nium 1.5 TDCi.

    While Ford has been busy replacing most of its MPV range, with all-new S-MAX and Galaxy models, as well a substantial facelift to the C-MAX, the baby B-MAX has soldiered on. It’s the only model, apart from the Ka, not to have adopted Ford’s wide mouthed, Aston Martinesque grille, though it only has to be a matter of time before a facelifted version arrives. In the meantime, Ford has replaced its 1.6-litre TDCi engine with a downsized, identically powered 1.5-litre unit that manages to be 3.7mpg more economical, with CO2 emissions that are 6g/km less and with an acceleration to 62mph time that is just under a second faster. And the price for all of these improvements, a modest Ј130. At its launch, the B-MAX won plaudits for its interesting sliding rear doors that leave a pillarless space when both front and rear doors are open. It makes loading little’uns into the child seats in the back a breeze, especially in tightly proportioned car parks. That combined with generous head and legroom both front and rear, this is one seriously spacious car, despite its modest footprint. The dashboard is attractively styled with all of the controls logically arranged, though we think it’s a shame that there are so many tiny buttons on the audio system. The optional navigation system is hindered by a small screen, albeit with excellent colourful graphics, we just wish there was more of it. Still, it’s neatly positioned just within your eye line. The dashboard materials are made out of decent plastics and feel well appointed, though it’s a disappointment that the door tops are made out of hard materials. The driving position is best described as command, with a good view out along the bonnet. In fact, all round vision is pretty good, thanks to deep windows, except for the super wide central door pillars. Boot space is smaller than most of its immediate rivals, but thanks to a low sill and wide opening, you can make good use of the available room. There’s extra underfloor storage and the seats fold down totally flat. With just 94bhp on tap, you’re not likely to win any traffic light Grand Prix, and it’s surprising that Ford doesn’t offer the more powerful 118bhp edition of this engine for extra zip. It’s a quiet unit, though, and is only really noticeable at higher revs, though at motorway speeds it’s barely audible. Besides, the sound is drowned out by the excessive road noise and fluttering of the wind around the windscreen. As you would expect from a Blue Oval-badged car, it’s the driving experience that really excels, with communicative, agile steering and while there’s some lean when cornering, on account of its tall sides, everything is kept well in check, with generous amounts of grip. But it’s the ride comfort that is at odds with the high degree of comfort that the B-MAX otherwise delivers, with a firm edge to the suspension that results in too many of the road imperfections being transmitted into the cabin. The slick, smooth five-speed manual gearbox is a delight to use and has a light clutch as a companion. Gear ratios are well thought out, allowing you to make reasonable progress even considering the modest power and size of the engine.
  • Honda CB Shine SP.

    This month seems to be a special one for Honda Motorcycle and Scooter India (HMSI) Limited as the company has rolled out a brand-new variant of their best-selling motorcycle, the CB Shine, called the CB Shine SP. The prices for this new variant start at Rs 59,990 (ex-Delhi) and go all the way up to Rs 64,400 (ex-Delhi) for the topend variant. There are changes galore on this new variant which now gets better-looking body panels, stickers and a new paint job. The biggest change, however, lies within the engine. Honda have equipped the bike with a five-speed gearbox which once served the CB Stunner. Read more about the addition of one more cog in our road test review of the SP.
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