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Munktells 30-40 hk

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Munktells 30-40 hk - information: Munktells 30-40 hk is a very good car, that was released by "Munktells" company. We collected the best 9 photos of Munktells 30-40 hk on this page.

Brand Name Munktells
Model Munktells 30-40 hk
Number of views 60614 views
Model's Rate 6.5 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • MIDSIZE ROLE PLAYER.

    The naked standard motorcycle category appears to have finally taken hold in the US, due in large part to the sales success of Yamaha’s bombshell FZ-09. After Suzuki’s challenge to the Yamaha triple (“Budget Blasters,” October/November 2015), now Kawasaki is jumping into the middleweight standard fray by bringing its Z800 ABS to the US market for 2016. Well, 49 states for now; California residents unfortunately won’t get the bike yet due to the added emissions requirements. Available since 2013 in other markets, the Z800 is powered by a liquidcooled, DOHC, 806cc inline-four that is basically a bored-out, upgraded version of the old Z750 engine. A 2.6mm-larger bore with 10-percent-lighter pistons getting cooled by larger oil jets, revised intake/exhaust ports, longer intake manifolds, and a staggered intake funnel setup along with 2mm-larger throttle bodies (now 34mm) boosts peak horsepower by a claimed 6 hp to a 111 hp peak in European tune (Kawasaki USA wasn’t listing power figures). Longer exhaust header pipes with equalizer tubes between cylinders and an exhaust valve in the under-engine chamber help midrange power. The European press has had plenty of good things to say about the Z800’s engine, and after a day spent riding in the streets of Palm Springs and up in the canyons of the San Jacinto mountain range, we’d heartily agree. There’s plenty of responsive low-end and midrange acceleration, aided in part by the change to a two-teeth-larger rear sprocket. While not quite up to the sprightly FZ-09 as far as overall power in the bottom half of the rev range, the Kawasaki towers over the GSX-S750 when it comes to response from the engine room. Power continues to build as rpm rises into the five-digit zone before tapering off slightly as the Z800’s engine approaches its rev limiter around 12,000 rpm, but there’s enough top-end power to be had without revving it that far, and wheelies are but a clutch-snap away. The Z750’s steel backbone frame was revised with two bolt-on aluminum subframe sections that allow the Z800’s front engine mounts to be positioned behind the cylinders. While Kawasaki says this allows the vibration from the inline-four to be isolated more effectively, some vibes can definitely be felt through the handlebar and footpegs above 7,500 rpm. Nonetheless, the Z800 has a nice, neutral yet fairly agile feel in the corners, with only a little effort required to fl ick the bike into a corner. Line changes in midcorner are easily accomplished with zero drama, and the stock Dunlop OEM-spec D214 Sportmax tires display good grip and light steering characteristics. There’s plenty of ground clearance, and the standard KYB suspension components on the Kawasaki-a 43mm inverted fork (adjustable for spring preload on one side and rebound damping on the other) and single rear shock (also adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping)-provide good wheel and chassis control even when the pace heats up. The ride is a little firm for pothole-ridden urban tarmac and highway superslab but nothing drastic. Despite the budget-looking standard-mount two-piece Nissin calipers, the brakes work well. Response is a little fl at, but power and feel are surprisingly good, with the 310mm discs likely helping by providing good leverage for the calipers. And the standard Nissin ABS works well too, with a fairly high intervention point and transparent action overall. Probably a good thing, as those brakes need to slow down around 509 pounds with a full fuel tank; even though it carries that weight well, the Z800’s heft is our only real gripe with the Kawasaki. Ergos are average standard bike fare, with a slight sporty cant to your upper torso offsetting the windblast. At $8,399, the Kawasaki Z800 ABS is a touch more expensive than the non-ABS-equipped Yamaha FZ-09 ($8,190) or the Suzuki GSX-S750 ($7,999 for the base model). But its solid performance definitely makes it worth a look in the middleweight standard category.
  • SIX HITTERS.

    These two Benelli sixes were part of a sensational stand by a coalition of three clubs for six-cylinder bikes from Honda, Kawasaki and Benelli. The yellow caf? racer was built by Jean Louis Gayot with help from friend Enrique Martinez. Jean Louis runs a small bike shop called Paris Moto Classique and said: “My desire was to have a caf? racer with silencers that were politically correct, but with a nice sound. I want to ride it on the road and see the reaction of people. I thought I was going to be stopped by a policeman on the roadside one time, but he waved at me and gave me the thumbs up. Another time I rode to Castellet [Paul Ricard circuit] and Agostini told me my bike was ‘ very efficient but also very musical’.” Gayot’s Sei has high-lift cams, six Dell’Orto carbs instead of the stock three, Fontana front brake and box-section swingarm. The special exhaust and tank/ seat bodywork were all sourced from Italy. The green road racer, called Garuda (a large predatory bird in Buddhist mythology) is owned by Bernard Moudurier, president of the Benelli Six Owners Club in France and founder of the Benelli Racing Team. Jean Louis said: “Bernard wanted to prove that the Sei could be a competitive road racing machine, unlike Benelli’s illfated Bol d’Or bike in 1976. He’s a guy who likes to prove nothing is impossible!” The bike finished 14th overall at Magny Cours in a classic endurance race, running second in the wet.
  • 2016 KTM 690 Duke.

    Just in case the last version didn’t already put your motorcycle license at risk, KTM has updated its ever-entertaining 690 Duke with a smoother, more powerful engine and updated electronics package that includes a supermoto mode, as well as traction control (optional) and riding modes. The single-cylinder engine gets the most important updates and now features a larger bore and shorter stroke. This, in conjunction with a new cylinder head and second balancer shaft, combines to give the engine not only 7 percent more horsepower and 6 percent more torque but also make it less prone to vibration when running down the highway. Throw in a more comfortable two-piece seat, updated triple clamps with revised offset for better handling, and new TFT display, and you have a bike that could give the other middleweight naked bikes a run for their money.
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