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Novabus RTS WFD

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Novabus RTS WFD - information: Novabus RTS WFD is a very good car, that was released by "Novabus" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Novabus RTS WFD on this page.

Brand Name Novabus
Model Novabus RTS WFD
Number of views 105741 views
Model's Rate 6.6 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • Skoda Superb SE L Executive 2.0 TDI Automatic.

    Earlier in the year, the latest Superb Estate faced one of its deadliest rivals in the large car arena, challenging Ford’s Mondeo in an estate car showdown. It beat its Blue Oval rival thanks to its spacious cabin and huge boot. Now, months later, we’ve got behind the wheel of the hatchback edition, paired to the more powerful 188bhp edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine and six-speed twin-clutch DSG automatic transmission. Here we test it in upmarket SE L Executive trim, which delivers a lengthy list of standard equipment for the Ј28,720 asking price. This more powerful edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine serves up effortless performance, but rarely feels as fast as the on paper figures suggest it should. Maybe it’s because the super refined drivetrain filters out all of the sensations of speed, instead delivering a relatively serene driving experience. The six-speed twin-clutch transmission certainly swaps cogs efficiently enough, with little evidence that the gears have been changed. The engine may sound a little clattery from cold, but soon settles down to become a distant backing track, and you’re more likely to be troubled with the road and tyre noise that permeates all too readily into the cabin. Through corners, the handling is neat and tidy, with low levels of body lean and a generous amount of grip. The steering is accurate and nicely weighted, however it isn’t as much fun to pilot as a Ford Mondeo, for example. Ride comfort is a mixed bag, and at faster motorway speeds it soaks up imperfections with ease. At lower speeds the suspension can become fidgety, transferring too many potholes and thumps into the cabin. The cabin of the Superb is a masterclass in elegant design. Swathes of soft-touch plastics are mixed with smart looking metal appliquйs, with all of the major controls exactly where you expect them. The eight-inch touchscreen navigation system is perfectly positioned and a delight to use, thanks to clearly labelled buttons alongside. The instruments are a model of clarity thanks to a white on black design, however, it’s a shame that the markings are out of tune for the UK market, showing speeds of 20, 40 and 60, when 30, 50 and 70 would be more relevant. The driving position is multi-adjustable, while the no-cost option of leather and Alcantara seats hug you nicely in place when cornering. Generous head and legroom both front and rear give the sense that you’re travelling in a vehicle altogether more upmarket, and limousinelike in flavour. Family life inevitably means lots of clutter and there’s plenty of space for oddments thanks to a large lidded tray ahead of the gear lever, a well-proportioned glovebox and door pockets, as well as an area beneath the armrest. Rearward vision is a little compromised due to a shallow rear screen, but thankfully rear parking sensors are provided on all but the entry-level model. One piece of handy buying advice is to make sure that you tick the box for the no-cost rear wiper, as the default option is that it comes without. It’s at the business end where the Superb plays its biggest trump card, with a boot capacity of 625 litres that is larger than any other similarly sized car on the road.
  • The science and silence of AMG.

    AMG chairman Tobias Moers has revealed to Wheels that AMG is shifting its focus away from power and on to sharper dynamics for its future models. This means the introduction of high-tech systems such as active aerodynamics, four-wheel steering and even a Drift Mode function as AMG moves into a new battleground in the war for performance car ascendency. AMG has long held a power advantage over its rivals at BMW’s M Division and Audi RS, and Moers says the focus is now on finessing how that prodigious grunt is sent to the road. “It’s not my target to be the most powerful car,” he said. “The target is to be the best driving car. The next step is to be more active, with more active systems like active aero, and to be more active with kinematics.” Moers revealed AMG is well advanced in developing a range of active systems, most of which will debut on the much-hyped road-legal version of the AMG GT3 racing car due later this year. Expected to be badged as the GT R, Moers says the Porsche 911 GT3 rival “will signal the next step for AMG.” It’s also likely to be the first AMG to utilise four-wheel steering. “We discussed active technology earlier, and this will be one of those systems,” Moers told us. “It will help to increase high-speed stability, yaw damping at high speed, and you can increase agility in the car as well. It’s good technology.” The GT R, which is in the final stages of development, takes heavy inspiration from the GT3 racer (pictured) and will include a more aggressive, track-inspired body kit, dominated by a larger rear spoiler and front splitter. Moers hinted this makes the GT R the ideal model to debut active aerodynamic components to improve dynamics. The GT R will also be lighter than the 1570kg AMG GT S, boast wider tracks front and rear, and could produce as much as 415kW from its 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8. Moers wouldn’t be drawn on the GT R’s potential power output, but did say “we have plenty of room to grow [with the 4.0-litre engine].” Currently the 4.0-litre V8 produces 375kW/750Nm in the AMG GT S. Future models will see AMG step even further along the hightech route. Moers revealed he sees a future where AMG models are powered purely by electricity and confirmed his engineers are already developing electric drivetrains that could manifest in a number of different forms. “Electrification makes more sense to me than performance diesels,” he said. “We are looking at everything from plug-in hybrids to pure electric and electric turbos because we are not in position to exclude something from our portfolio. So we’ll do work on several programs at once to find our own path on electrification for the future.” But while Moers sees electrification as inevitable, he’s quick to assure AMG fans that future electric models will retain the brand’s character. “Sound is crucial to AMG, so we will find a solution,” he said. “We found one with the SLS Electric Drive and we know it’s important.” The 552kW SLS AMG Electric Drive, which in 2013 claimed the title as the world’s quickest production electric car with a 0-100km/h sprint of 3.9sec, pumped artificial noise into the cabin during acceleration via its audio system. What’s unlikely to have a long future is AMG’s mighty 12-cylinder engine. Moers confirmed that AMG’s iconic 6.0-litre twin-turbo V12 is under threat due to evertightening emission laws. “We do have V12 aficionados worldwide who want us to keep it, but the V12 segment no longer represents AMG as a brand. There are customers that are very interested in that engine in that exclusive segment, so we are responsible for engineering a V12 and it’s up to us to give the V12 a future. But that’s not decided.” Moers said recent changes to China’s emissions rules have placed the V12’s future in jeopardy. “That’s giving us a big headache with the V12, so it’s a question of how we proceed. That’s what we’re discussing in the company now.”
  • 2017 Suzuki SV650.

    Suzuki has announced that the ever-popular SV650 will make its offi- cial return to the States next year, this after Suzuki saw just intermittent success with its Gladius and SFV650 models. Introduced as an early-release 2017 model, the new SV features 140 redesigned components for both the engine and chassis and weighs around 15 pounds less than the outgoing SFV while producing a claimed 75 hp (versus 71 hp for the SFV). Specific changes to the engine include new pistons with resin-coated skirts, a new exhaust system, and staggered intake funnels that improve midrange performance. The bike also features Suzuki’s one-push easystart system, as well as a low-rpm assist mode, which activates the bike’s idle speed control valve at low engine revs to assist with leaving a stop. On the chassis side, Suzuki’s goal was to make the bike more compact and narrow, which it’s accomplished with updates to the frame and changes to the tank that reduce overall tank width by just over 2.5 inches. The new SV650 will be available early summer 2016.
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