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Nysa 325

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Nysa 325 - information: Nysa 325 is a very good car, that was released by "Nysa" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Nysa 325 on this page.

Brand Name Nysa
Model Nysa 325
Number of views 111796 views
Model's Rate 6.2 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • Improved Kyalami could host WEC.

    Porsche’s Kyalami Racing Circuit played host to the recent launch of the 991.2 Turbo and C4S (which you can read about beginning on page 20) and, after speaking with officials from the circuit, Total 911 can reveal there are plans in place to return the venue to the very top of the motorsporting calendar. Purchased at an auction in July 2014 by Porsche South Africa CEO and entrepreneur, Toby Venter, a total refurbishment of the facility and track commenced in May 2015, and is set to be finished by the end of May 2016, with a variety of new buildings and upgraded facilities already evident. The fully resurfaced track itself is wider in some areas, with a longer straight, and run-off areas have been greatly improved - all in line with FIA regulations. The track has an illustrious history of races and drivers to its name, including 18 Formula One Grands Prix hosted between 1967 and 1985, while legends such as Jacky Ickx, Alain Prost, Jim Clark, Nigel Mansell and Jackie Stewart have also raced there. Kyalami’s general manager refused to be drawn on speculation linking the circuit with an appearance on the WEC calendar when questioned by Total 911, but did confirm that several manufacturers have already booked the track for days on end towards the latter part of 2016. This is partly the reason why the track won’t be branded as ‘Porsche’, as it will be open for any manufacturer or brand to hire the facility. Once finished, there will also be a skid pan, a 1.1-kilometre handling circuit and an off-road training course. Needless to say, there is a lot more planned for this new world-class facility. Mr Venter is an avid Porsche racer, so we won’t be surprised if he plans to bring WEC and Formula One to South Africa, while journalists driving the circuit at the Turbo launch were impressed by the layout and on-track challenges. It is also quite possible that Porsche AG will conduct hot weather track testing there in the future. Although the company won’t be able to keep its cars away from prying eyes, perfect weather conditions will be present at the venue, which is also one of the highest altitude tracks in the world. Porsche AG has been conducting hot weather tests in South Africa for a number of years now, and having a track in the vicinity to add to its test schedule will be of considerable benefit.
  • Vauxhall Viva SE 1.0i ecoFLEX.

    It’s been a few months since the baby Viva went on sale, but because there weren’t any 99g/km ecoFLEX editions available to drive at the car’s launch, we have had to wait until now to get our hands on one. Reviving a legendary name from the past, the Viva wears the Opel Karl nameplate in Europe and replaces the boxy Agila at the bottom of the Vauxhall line-up. Just one sub-100g/km edition is offered, and that’s this entry-level SE edition, however, it comes pretty well kitted out for the cash, with big car features like cruise control, Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity and a lane departure warning system. It’s a shame that you’ll need to cough up extra to get DAB digital radio and a space saver spare wheel, though. It’s a cute looking car, with an appearance that’s a whole lot more appealing than its predecessor. Inside, the dashboard is attractively styled, and though it’s awash with hard plastics, Vauxhall’s designers have managed to make the surfaces look good, as well as giving them a sturdy, built-to-last feel. All of the controls are logically arranged high up on the dashboard, and the white on black instruments are easy to read. The driving position is pretty good, despite the steering wheel only being adjustable for rake and not reach, with the seats delivering decent comfort levels. Headroom both front and rear is expansive and surprisingly considering its tiny footprint, there’s more than enough space in the back to carry a couple of passengers, with knee and legroom generous. There’s seatbelts for three back there, but because the Viva is relatively narrow, any middle seat passenger will soon become close friends with the other participants. Boot space is on the small side compared to other city car rivals, not helped by a high sill to haul luggage over, but can be opened up further by tipping the rear seats down almost flat. With most Vivas spending their time in the urban sprawl, there’s sufficient performance to keep up with other traffic. The little 74bhp 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine is quiet and only becomes more raucous when you have your right foot to the floor. The gearbox is smooth and easy to slide in and out of gear, all helped by a light clutch. Surprisingly there’s no stop-start technology fitted to this car - maybe Vauxhall engineers are keeping it up their sleeves for a later, more efficient version. At motorway speeds, the baby Viva is more than capable of cutting it in the outside lane, with decent mid- and upper-range zip, though you’ll want to invest in a set of ear defenders, as there’s more road noise than is ideal, and you’ll hear some wind fluffing from around the front end. Handling is generally neat and tidy, albeit with a modicum of lean when cornering. There’s decent grip, however, and while the steering doesn’t serve up an enormous amount of feel, it’s alright, and better around town than on the open road. Thanks to its compact size, it’s easily manoeuvrable. One of the biggest areas to impress is in ride comfort, with an absorbent suspension that soaks up even the scruffiest of surfaces with great maturity and ease.
  • SsangYong Turismo.

    Most of the column inches about SsangYong have been concerning its brand new baby crossover, the Tivoli, a newcomer that has contributed to a doubling of sales during 2015. But in the background, away from the headlines, the Korean firm has been busy updating some of the older members of the line-up, too, with the introduction of a brand-new Euro-6 emissions compliant 2.2-litre diesel engine in the Korando, Rexton and Turismo. Here we test it in SsangYong’s gargantuan MPV, which last year received a general spruce up. Our test car is the flagship of the line-up, the fourwheel- drive ELX paired to a new sevenspeed Mercedes-Benz-sourced sevenspeed automatic transmission, which at Ј24,995, including the fantastic five-year limitless warranty, is an absolute bargain. The Turismo dwarfs any other car that it parks alongside. Its sheer bulk translates into a massive amount of space, with the cabin configured in a two-two-three seating arrangement, with generous space for seven occupants to spread out in all directions. The rear bench seat slides fore and aft, and there’s also sufficient room for luggage for all passengers, too, which is a rarity in this segment. The design of the cabin has fallen behind the latest trends, and the large centrally mounted dials can be difficult to read in poor light. There’s a mixture of both soft and hard surfaces, and an overriding feeling of solidity, though it all looks just a little bit dated. The instruments ahead of the driver look like a 1980s computer game, for instance. You’re sat up high in a command-like position, and allround visibility is excellent thanks to large, deep windows. The seats are comfortable enough, though they do lack lateral support when cornering. Storage space is well thought out, with drinks holders in the door pockets, a deep armrest and a decent area in front of the gear lever. And you can tell from the double coin holders that SsangYong’s got the Turismo’s market clearly defined, and that’s as a taxi. Despite its weight, the 2.2-litre Turismo is surprisingly sprightly off the line. The engine is quiet and never sounds strained, no matter how many revs you pile on. Developing 176bhp and 295lb ft of torque, there’s 15 per cent more power, and torque is up 11 per cent compared to the outgoing engine. The foot operated park brake is outdated, and despite the seven-speed automatic transmission being new, there are occasions when it is slow to change gear. While it’s certainly not the most agile car to drive, in view of its numb steering, it’s pleasing that there’s an almost total absence of body roll when cornering. Grip levels on account of the standard four-wheel-drive system are high, and the suspension delivers a floaty experience that seems adept at soaking up the worst of the lumps and bumps that are present on the UK’s roads. Finally, with a two-tonne towing capacity, this all-wheel-drive MPV should shrug off hauling a large caravan or motorboat with ease.
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