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Orion I

All Orion Photos

Orion I - information: Orion I is a very good car, that was released by "Orion" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Orion I on this page.

Brand Name Orion
Model Orion I
Number of views 60661 views
Model's Rate 7.4 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • LAND ROVER news.

    As the Discovery reaches its twilight years, with a replacement around 18 months away, Land Rover has launched a pair of special models named Graphite and Landmark. Both versions feature the robust 252bhp 3.0-litre SDV6 powerplant that produces a hefty 443lb ft of torque. Capable of towing up to 3.5 tonnes, it isn’t the most economical vehicle on the planet, though CO2 emissions have been steadily decreasing and are now down to 203g/km, with an official combined fuel economy figure of 36.7mpg on the combined cycle. Both versions feature Xenon headlights, front and rear parking sensors, a heated front windscreen, 19-inch alloy wheels, leather upholstery, heated front seats and a reversing camera, as well as a 380-watt Meridian Audio system. Landmark versions have a whole host of extra equipment and is based on the flagship Discovery HSE Luxury model, and includes 20-inch alloy wheels, heated seats front and rear, adaptive headlights, Windsor leather upholstery with electric and memory front seats, electric Alpine sunroof, an 825-watt surround sound system, a leather and heated steering wheel and rear seat entertainment system. There’s also black detailing to the badges, front grille, side vents, door mirrors and roof bars. The price of the Discovery Graphite is Ј47,495, with the plusher Landmark model costing Ј55,995. Available to order right now, the first cars will arrive at Land Rover dealers in January.
  • Porsche North America Racing achieve podiums at Daytona.

    Porsche North America Racing started the 2016 WeatherTech United SportsCar Championship with a third place finish in the GTLM class at the 54th Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona. The no.912 Porsche 911 RSR of Earl Bamber, Frйdйric Makowiecki and Michael Christensen battled through an unusually attritional race to take the final step on the podium, although it was nearly so much more for the factory Porsche squad. A wet qualifying session on the Thursday, disrupted by torrential rain, saw the no.911 and no.912 Porsches lock out the front row of the grid in the hands of Nick Tandy and Makowiecki respectively. Such was the GTLM field’s dominance in the wet, the two 911 RSRs actually set the fastest times overall but, thanks to IMSA’s rules, would be forced to start behind the prototype machinery. During the race’s opening hour, Tandy (as is now becoming customary in the USCC) raced into an early lead as the no.912 dropped back into a dogfight with the works Corvettes and BMWs. By the six-hour mark, the two factory Porsches crossed the line onetwo, with the no.911 still narrowly leading. However, through the night - heavily disrupted by multiple full-course caution periods - the momentum swung toward the no. 912 RSR. By dawn, the 54th Rolex 24 had boiled down to a battle between the two Porsches and the no.3 and no.4 Corvette duo. But, with Kйvin Estre at the wheel, the no.911 slowed dramatically on the banking with around five hours to go, a broken driveshaft forcing a lengthy stop for repairs leaving the no.912 to battle on alone. Patrick Pilet would eventually re-emerge in the 2015 championship-winning entry to help it on its way to some useful points in eighth place. After the final round of stops inside the last hour, Bamber found himself once again in the class lead. However, after being hunted down by Oliver Gavin in the no.4 Corvette, the Kiwi racer was nudged out of the lead at the turn five hairpin. With around 20 minutes remaining, the second Chevrolet - in the hands of Antonio Garcia - also found a way through, this time at the Bus Stop chicane, leaving Bamber to watch on as the two Corvettes fought it out for victory. Despite coming close, the two GM cars never came to blows, as Bamber brought the no.912 machine home in third for the crew’s first podium since ViR last August.
  • BIG BIKE VS. SMALL BIKE.

    We see it quite often at the racetrack, especially in club races where classes are mixed: Rider on small bike passes rider on big bike in seemingly every corner, only to be passed back right away on the next straight. Even if the power difference is not that great between the two bikes, the contrast between corner speed and straightaway speed of the two bikes becomes magnified as each bike is ridden to maximize its advantages. The reality of the situation is that the outright maximum cornering speed between any two bikes is not that significantly different, provided both are on similar tires. If the tires are similar, both bikes should be capable of the same lateral acceleration (limited by the friction coefficient of the tires) and corner speed. Why do we see such a contrast in how the bikes are ridden? On an underpowered bike, the quickest way around the track is to maximize corner speed, in turn getting onto each straight with as much speed as possible. This is accomplished by completing the corner with as large an arc as possible, which converts lateral acceleration into maximum corner speed. For a typical single-radius corner, this means entering as wide as possible to maximize entry speed, turning in to the apex with little trail- braking, and keeping the bike at maximum lean with a constant radius until the very exit of the corner. In contrast, the quickest lap times on a more powerful bike are usually found by maximizing acceleration onto each straight and taking advantage of that power; this is achieved by sacrificing some corner speed to pick the bike up and apply the throttle earlier at the exit. For that same single-radius corner, this means a tighter entry, more trail-braking to a slightly later apex, with a tighter arc and less corner speed to get the bike up off the side of the tire as quickly as possible. As we found out in our displacement test last year where we compared the Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R750, and Kawasaki ZX-10R, it’s not so much that the smaller bikes have a handling advantage over the bigger bikes but rather it’s how each bike is ridden to play to its strength or weakness in the power department. Using data from our AiM Solo GPS lap timer, we could see differences in line and cornering speeds between the three bikes, just as you would expect given the horsepower of each. While a few horsepower here or there might not seem like it should impact line choice signifi- cantly, in practice even a small difference can significantly change how a particular corner or series of corners is negotiated. And the contrast between a lightweight bike and a literbike can be astonishing: We’ve encountered certain corners where the entry line is several feet different on an SV650 than it is on a 1000, for an example. Finding the optimum line to match the power of your bike does require some experimentation. The wide radius and high corner speed that less powerful bikes require typically brings with it a higher risk of a high-side crash in the middle of the corner just as the throttle is opened, and the safer option is to start with the tighter entry and lower corner speed of the big-bike line and work from there, adding more corner speed and a wider entry with practice. If you are looking at sector times on data, don’t forget to factor in any time gained or lost on the succeeding straight, which may or may not offset time saved in the corner itself. Given the contrast in lines between different bikes, the key point to remember is that the optimum line for your bike may be very different from the bike in front of you, and it’s quite often a mistake to blindly follow another rider at the track. Even if you are riding the same model of bike, the power difference may be enough that you can take advantage of a different line to be quicker, and that line may work to a further advantage when it comes time to make a pass. When you ride at the track, what bike you are on will at least in part determine what lines you should be taking, and you should try different options with that in mind. And if you change bikes and move to a more or less powerful machine- or even make modifications to the same bike for more power-know that the lines you had been using for years might need to be altered appropriately.
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