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Oshkosh 2206

All Oshkosh Photos

Oshkosh 2206 - information: Oshkosh 2206 is a very good car, that was released by "Oshkosh" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Oshkosh 2206 on this page.

Brand Name Oshkosh
Model Oshkosh 2206
Number of views 22305 views
Model's Rate 8.2 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • R nine T Scrambler.

    The R nine T Scrambler is a German take on scrambler styling that seems to have become the flavour of the season. This classic-looking bike is powered by a 1,170- cc air-cooled Boxer twin with 110 PS and 116 Nm of power and torque available at 7,750 RPM and 6,000 RPM respectively. The minimalistic design of the bike can be tweaked to suit one’s taste. To help with this, BMW Motorrad are offering a range of accessories and attachments - for instance, at the rear, a removable section of the sub-frame allows riders to use it for solo as well as pillion riding. Will it come to India? Stay tuned. If it does, we will get you that update.
  • RENAULT.

    A new special edition version of the Twingo has been unveiled by Renault called the Iconic. It’s available with both the 1.0 SCe 70 petrol engine and 0.9 TCe 90 powerplant, with both versions falling below the magic 100g/km CO2 barrier. Priced at Ј11,845 for the former and Ј12,545 for the latter, the Twingo Iconic is based on the Dynamique model, and features cruise control, electric front windows, front fog lights, electric and heated mirrors, DAB digital radio, rear privacy glass, gloss black door mirrors and a navigation system that operates via your smartphone. Moving to the cabin, there’s black part leather upholstery with white and violet piping, climate control, automatic headlights and wipers, as well as door sill plates and floor mats. Two unique colours are offered - Ultraviolet and Lunar Grey - as well as black and white. Along the side of the Twingo Iconic there’s Ultraviolet side decals and a similarly coloured emblem on the centre caps of the 16-inch alloy wheels. Black alloy wheels are offered as a no-cost optional extra. The new Twingo Iconic is available to order now from Renault dealers.
  • Vauxhall Viva SE 1.0i ecoFLEX.

    It’s been a few months since the baby Viva went on sale, but because there weren’t any 99g/km ecoFLEX editions available to drive at the car’s launch, we have had to wait until now to get our hands on one. Reviving a legendary name from the past, the Viva wears the Opel Karl nameplate in Europe and replaces the boxy Agila at the bottom of the Vauxhall line-up. Just one sub-100g/km edition is offered, and that’s this entry-level SE edition, however, it comes pretty well kitted out for the cash, with big car features like cruise control, Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity and a lane departure warning system. It’s a shame that you’ll need to cough up extra to get DAB digital radio and a space saver spare wheel, though. It’s a cute looking car, with an appearance that’s a whole lot more appealing than its predecessor. Inside, the dashboard is attractively styled, and though it’s awash with hard plastics, Vauxhall’s designers have managed to make the surfaces look good, as well as giving them a sturdy, built-to-last feel. All of the controls are logically arranged high up on the dashboard, and the white on black instruments are easy to read. The driving position is pretty good, despite the steering wheel only being adjustable for rake and not reach, with the seats delivering decent comfort levels. Headroom both front and rear is expansive and surprisingly considering its tiny footprint, there’s more than enough space in the back to carry a couple of passengers, with knee and legroom generous. There’s seatbelts for three back there, but because the Viva is relatively narrow, any middle seat passenger will soon become close friends with the other participants. Boot space is on the small side compared to other city car rivals, not helped by a high sill to haul luggage over, but can be opened up further by tipping the rear seats down almost flat. With most Vivas spending their time in the urban sprawl, there’s sufficient performance to keep up with other traffic. The little 74bhp 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine is quiet and only becomes more raucous when you have your right foot to the floor. The gearbox is smooth and easy to slide in and out of gear, all helped by a light clutch. Surprisingly there’s no stop-start technology fitted to this car - maybe Vauxhall engineers are keeping it up their sleeves for a later, more efficient version. At motorway speeds, the baby Viva is more than capable of cutting it in the outside lane, with decent mid- and upper-range zip, though you’ll want to invest in a set of ear defenders, as there’s more road noise than is ideal, and you’ll hear some wind fluffing from around the front end. Handling is generally neat and tidy, albeit with a modicum of lean when cornering. There’s decent grip, however, and while the steering doesn’t serve up an enormous amount of feel, it’s alright, and better around town than on the open road. Thanks to its compact size, it’s easily manoeuvrable. One of the biggest areas to impress is in ride comfort, with an absorbent suspension that soaks up even the scruffiest of surfaces with great maturity and ease.
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