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Oshkosh ARFF

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Oshkosh ARFF - information: Oshkosh ARFF is a very good car, that was released by "Oshkosh" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Oshkosh ARFF on this page.

Brand Name Oshkosh
Model Oshkosh ARFF
Number of views 93846 views
Model's Rate 6.5 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • DS 4.

    Little more than a year after Citroen announced that it would be spinning off its DS cars into a separate luxury subbrand, the French firm has facelifted half of its line-up, with both the DS 4 and flagship DS 5 sporting the company’s new corporate nose treatment. The rest of the range, namely the DS 3 supermini and Cabrio, will get an update within weeks, adopting a similarly bold front end that will also see the end of the double chevrons adorning the car, as has been done with the DS 4 and DS 5. While the UK is the biggest single market for the DS 3, there’s still some work to be done on the rest of the range, but the newly formed firm is hoping that revisions to the DS 4, including a realignment of its market positioning will transform sales. DS Automobiles is looking to attract two different sets of buyers for the newly revised DS 4, with the regular DS 4 riding lower compared to before, while the new Crossback model is aimed at the crossover market thanks to its raised ride height of 30 millimetres, and more rugged, off-road inspired styling cues. At the car’s international launch a couple of months ago, we focused upon the DS 4 Crossback edition, but now with the first examples arriving in UK showrooms, we were able to spend time behind the wheel of the DS 4 Prestige, paired to the flagship 178bhp BlueHDi engine. One of the biggest criticisms of the outgoing DS 4 was its unyielding ride and we’re pleased to say that ride comfort has been transformed on the new car. Deep ruts and potholes are tackled with ease, and there’s no need to brace yourself like you needed to do with the old car. Steering feel is particularly agile with lots of feel, with the DS 4 asserting itself as being different from the humdrum hatchback segment. Through the bends there’s minimal body lean and a decent amount of grip, inspiring confidence in more challenging corners. While it doesn’t offer the same kind of driver satisfaction as Ford’s Focus, there’s reasonable agility and the experience is reassuringly safe and predictable. The engine is quiet and refined, only becoming heard when you really gun the right hand pedal, and while there’s a fair amount of road noise on noisier surfaces, wind noise isn’t intrusive. Away from the lights there’s decent pace, with smooth gearshifts from the six-speed automatic transmission. The brakes deliver good bite, though beware if you have anything larger than average sized feet, as the space in the foot well is at a premium. There’s very little room between the centre console and the clutch pedal on manual gearbox variants, and it’s all too easy to get your size tens stuck uncomfortably, and then there’s a mad scramble to get the clutch down in time for you to stop. It’s a good reason why you’re better off opting for the automatic variants in preference to the manual versions. Apart from revisions to the dashboard to incorporate a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system, and the first time that Apple CarPlay has been seen in a PSA Peugeot-Citroen-DS product, it’s business as usual. So that means a nicely appointed cabin with surfaces that are a cut above the norm in the medium car segment. The trademark DS watchstrap-inspired leather upholstery is on offer and looks sensational. There’s squidgy materials used for the dashboard, but disappointingly the door tops are hard plastic unless you opt for the uprated leather trim. The instruments where you can change the backlighting are a nice touch, and all of the controls are neatly positioned up high for ease of use. You’ll need to be a contortionist to use the USB socket, or have small hands, though, because it’s awkwardly positioned on the centre console. And that’s particularly disappointing as the use of Apple’s CarPlay depends on you being able to plug in your iPhone via the USB socket. The newly introduced touchscreen is easy to use and nicely positioned just within your field of vision. While it isn’t the most responsive system around, it’s certainly no better or worse than some rival systems. Our test car came equipped with the distinctive watchstrap upholstery and comfort and lateral support is simply excellent. It’s also easy to adjust the seats to gain a good position, though the steering wheel always feels like it is positioned too close. Space up front is pretty good, apart from the aforementioned pedal problems, while at the rear there’s surprisingly more space than you expect. Once installed in the back, knee and headroom is actually alright, though it can be a bit of challenge to get in and out. Those shapely styled rear doors come to a point, and if you’re not careful you could do someone a mischief. Space around the cabin for oddments is generally good, with a decent-sized tray in front of the gear lever and well-proportioned door pockets. While vision out of the front of the car is good, thick rear pillars and a shallow rear window make manoeuvring more of a challenge. It’s therefore pleasing that all DS 4s come with rear parking sensors for added reassurance. Boot space is well proportioned at 385 litres, though you’ll have to get over the high sill first. The optional Denon audio system restricts space a little, but the seats are easy to fold down with the pull of a lever. With the launch of the new DS 4, prices have increased a notch due to realignment of the model range. Where the previous DSign model offered an attractive entry price to DS 4 ownership, it wasn’t particularly well equipped, something you can’t level at all models of this latest DS 4 range. For instance, all versions come with DAB digital radio, a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system, dual-zone climate control, rear privacy glass, cruise control and automatic headlights and wipers.
  • Seinfeld Porsches to auction at Amelia Island.

    Gooding & Co has pulled off something of a coup with the news the esteemed US auction house has been chosen to put 16 Porsches from the famous Jerry Seinfeld Collection under the hammer at the Amelia Island sale on 11 March. Comedian, Seinfeld is one of the most well known Porsche collectors in the world, however, the exact details regarding the cars in his collection (rumoured to be around 50-strong) have, until now, remained relatively secret. Among the Zuffenhausen metal on offer from the Seinfeld Collection, which includes a 1955 550 Spyder (expected to realise Ј3.4-4.1 million), a 917/30 and a Carrera GT prototype, there are a number of significant Porsche 911s set for the sale at Amelia Island. From Total 911’s perspective, the most interesting of these from the comedian’s consignment is the genuine 1974 911 3.0-litre IROC RSR, complete with a Ј830,000-Ј1 million estimate. Chassis 911 460 0016 was the first RSR chassis built for the inaugural International Race of Champions and was driven to third place in the first race at the Riverside Raceway by American F1 star, Peter Revson. The Bright yellow 911, powered by a 3.0-litre version of Porsche’s high butterfl y RSR engine, was also driven by 1973 Indy 500 winner, Gordon Johncock, and 1972 Can-Am champion, George Follmer. The incredible consignment also includes a 993 RSR Cup car and a 997 GT3 4.0 Cup Brumos Commerative Edition (a special collaboration between the esteemed dealer and Porsche Motorsport North America). On the road car front, three Porsche Speedsters catch the eye: a 1957 356A, a 3.2 Carrera and a 997 (the latter in Pure Blue), while a 964 Turbo S Flachbau will also be up for grabs. “I’ve never bought a car as an investment,” Seinfeld has explained. “I don’t really even think of myself as a collector. I just love cars. And I still love these cars. But it’s time to send some of them back into the world, for someone else to enjoy, as I have.” The Seinfeld Collection will go under the hammer at Racquet Island during the Amelia Island Concours week on Friday 11 March. Check Total911.com for updates.
  • MIDSIZE ROLE PLAYER.

    The naked standard motorcycle category appears to have finally taken hold in the US, due in large part to the sales success of Yamaha’s bombshell FZ-09. After Suzuki’s challenge to the Yamaha triple (“Budget Blasters,” October/November 2015), now Kawasaki is jumping into the middleweight standard fray by bringing its Z800 ABS to the US market for 2016. Well, 49 states for now; California residents unfortunately won’t get the bike yet due to the added emissions requirements. Available since 2013 in other markets, the Z800 is powered by a liquidcooled, DOHC, 806cc inline-four that is basically a bored-out, upgraded version of the old Z750 engine. A 2.6mm-larger bore with 10-percent-lighter pistons getting cooled by larger oil jets, revised intake/exhaust ports, longer intake manifolds, and a staggered intake funnel setup along with 2mm-larger throttle bodies (now 34mm) boosts peak horsepower by a claimed 6 hp to a 111 hp peak in European tune (Kawasaki USA wasn’t listing power figures). Longer exhaust header pipes with equalizer tubes between cylinders and an exhaust valve in the under-engine chamber help midrange power. The European press has had plenty of good things to say about the Z800’s engine, and after a day spent riding in the streets of Palm Springs and up in the canyons of the San Jacinto mountain range, we’d heartily agree. There’s plenty of responsive low-end and midrange acceleration, aided in part by the change to a two-teeth-larger rear sprocket. While not quite up to the sprightly FZ-09 as far as overall power in the bottom half of the rev range, the Kawasaki towers over the GSX-S750 when it comes to response from the engine room. Power continues to build as rpm rises into the five-digit zone before tapering off slightly as the Z800’s engine approaches its rev limiter around 12,000 rpm, but there’s enough top-end power to be had without revving it that far, and wheelies are but a clutch-snap away. The Z750’s steel backbone frame was revised with two bolt-on aluminum subframe sections that allow the Z800’s front engine mounts to be positioned behind the cylinders. While Kawasaki says this allows the vibration from the inline-four to be isolated more effectively, some vibes can definitely be felt through the handlebar and footpegs above 7,500 rpm. Nonetheless, the Z800 has a nice, neutral yet fairly agile feel in the corners, with only a little effort required to fl ick the bike into a corner. Line changes in midcorner are easily accomplished with zero drama, and the stock Dunlop OEM-spec D214 Sportmax tires display good grip and light steering characteristics. There’s plenty of ground clearance, and the standard KYB suspension components on the Kawasaki-a 43mm inverted fork (adjustable for spring preload on one side and rebound damping on the other) and single rear shock (also adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping)-provide good wheel and chassis control even when the pace heats up. The ride is a little firm for pothole-ridden urban tarmac and highway superslab but nothing drastic. Despite the budget-looking standard-mount two-piece Nissin calipers, the brakes work well. Response is a little fl at, but power and feel are surprisingly good, with the 310mm discs likely helping by providing good leverage for the calipers. And the standard Nissin ABS works well too, with a fairly high intervention point and transparent action overall. Probably a good thing, as those brakes need to slow down around 509 pounds with a full fuel tank; even though it carries that weight well, the Z800’s heft is our only real gripe with the Kawasaki. Ergos are average standard bike fare, with a slight sporty cant to your upper torso offsetting the windblast. At $8,399, the Kawasaki Z800 ABS is a touch more expensive than the non-ABS-equipped Yamaha FZ-09 ($8,190) or the Suzuki GSX-S750 ($7,999 for the base model). But its solid performance definitely makes it worth a look in the middleweight standard category.
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