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Otokar Cobra

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Otokar Cobra - information: Otokar Cobra is a very good car, that was released by "Otokar" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Otokar Cobra on this page.

Brand Name Otokar
Model Otokar Cobra
Number of views 97445 views
Model's Rate 5.1 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER PHEV 2.0 MIVEC GX4h.

    Bandwagons have rarely looked as tasty as this. Mitsubishi’s first PHEV (plug-in hybrid electric vehicle) looked like a confused fish, but now it has design bite and a sparkle in its LED eyes. If it means business, it brings a market report that makes irresistible reading: in the last 12 months, around 39,000 hybrid cars have sold in the UK, a rise of around 7,000 on the previous year. And this is the star of that sales storm, Britain’s number one plug-in hybrid. Not that I initially felt turned on. My car was delivered by an expert called Dave. I gave him a lift to the railway station, but by the time we’d got to the drop-off bay, I began to wish he’d stay. After all, the boot’s quite roomy, even with all those batteries aboard. It wasn’t that Dave was great company (though if you’re reading this, Dave, it was nice to meet you), but just more that the initial prospect of a gear-free gizmo with steering paddles that effectively operate braking, with buttons that allow you to bank energy options, and with more than a Maplin’s worth of electrical socketry… well, let’s just say that as I drove off, I wondered if the handbrake might also cunningly adjust the fridge back at home. I certainly knew how Laika must have felt when those Russians packed her off in Sputnik 2: forget range anxiety, I needed to conquer technology terror first. But unlike a doomed dog I soon began to relax. Within two days, I was a first-class ecoheaded guru, mentally kerchinging full-on B5 regeneration mode on a 1:10 slope, tutting knowingly at the elastic nature of what is forecast to be a mile of battery juice (in the Outer Cotswolds, it can be mere furlongs) and laughing sarcastically at the difference between a functioning charge point and the sort supermarkets brag about (thanks, Sainsbury’s) which, when driven to, “don’t work and never have, mate, not since it was installed on day one’. Mitsubishi won’t tell you, but this car also comes with an anorak as standard. You think you'll not need it, but you’ll soon be zipped in snugly. The reason? E-driving is addictive. Think about it: rationally, it’s the last avenue of motoring pleasure open to any sane driver out there. Drive wisely, zap regularly (from home at about 50p a pop) and a brave new world of fiscal freedom beckons. Before you know it, you’re a moth to that elusive candle of perpetual motion. Be warned though: egg-shell throttling and B5-level regeneration spells inordinate use of the brake lights, which now kick in because, as Dave told me, regeneration has the same net effect as steady braking. Could this spell expensive dentistry for BMW drivers, I ask Dave. We agreed that, all told, we must make sure that the planet comes first. Shunt stress aside, the PHEV soon proves to be as much fun with batteries as anything roadgoing. For me, at least. Five hundred miles in, I show my wife we’re achieving the kind of mpg fossil fuellists can only dream about. Yes, she says, but driving at 29mph might not always be practical. And those other drivers… maybe that’s not friendly waving? She takes the car to work though, and while I haven’t monitored her journey GCHQstyle (it may well be a Bluetooth option), I snoop on her data and see she’s been wearing that anorak as well. Not that the PHEV’s incapable of driving like you forgot to turn the chip pan off. In a few hundred yards of thoughtless abandon, I floored it to see how it liked a bit of action. It was, as they say, up for it, though that two tonnes of bodyweight did make me think of a Labrador suffering from greyhound delusions. Still, I’m not sure Mitsubishi’s seeking product placement in the next Bond movie, so maybe it's a moot point. A snap verdict? I love it. It’s early days, but my PHEV’s got my expectations on maximum charge.
  • MAZDA news.

    Already installed under the bonnets of the Mazda2 and CX-3, the Japanese firm has now begun selling versions of the Mazda3 with the 103bhp 1.5-litre diesel engine. For the first time, Mazda’s medium-sized car is capable of emitting less than 100g/km of CO2, with the new powerplant achieving 74.3mpg and emissions of just 99g/km. It’s offered with both five-door hatchback and four-door Fastback bodystyles, and the choice of manual or automatic transmission - the latter exclusive to hatchback editions. The new engine is capable of achieving a maximum speed of 116mph and accelerates to 62mph in 11.0 seconds. Maximum torque of 199lb ft is produced between 1,600 and 2,500rpm. Available in each of the five trim levels - SE, SE Nav, SE-L, SE-L Nav and Sport Nav - prices start at Ј18,895 for the SE 1.5-litre diesel hatchback and Fastback, while the flagship of the line-up, the Sport Nav 1.5 diesel automatic hatchback is priced at Ј23,145. On sale since 1st December, the first examples are arriving in UK showrooms about now.
  • Bimota invent the techtro….

    Hands up-wedidn’t expect this. But givenBimotahavebased their newretro on theirmost contemporary, exclusive model we don’t think anyone did. TheirwildTesi 3D (Bike, Aug 2015 issue) is an engineeringmasterclass.Hub centre steering and a front swingarm separate suspension, steering and braking forces - so suspension functionswhile braking, bumps don’t affect steering, and so on. It’s amodernvisionof hewnaluminiumand hand-finishedparts. And soBimota think thismakes it perfect for some retroaction. For theRaceCafe the 3D’s angular body is swapped for a traditional profile and tiny seat unitwith the essential brown perch, and there’s the same headlight as onAriel’sAce. The 1078ccDucati V twin is swapped for the803cc Scrambler unit, with a curvy new pipe. Swingarms are un retro carbon. Stare long enough and, fromsome angles, the RaceCafe almost works… but not quite. For us, a Tesi should be all about sharp, cutting edge design. Other Bimotanews ismorepleasing. The newImpeto uses the Diavel’s bulging 1198ccTestastretta engine, anoptional blower taking peak power past 200bhp. Youcan specify a carbon frame, too. Best of all, Bimota are going back to their roots andoffering frame kits. Their BB3 canbe supplied as a rolling chassis to take the motor from a salvaged BMW S1000RR. Just like the good old days. Let’s hope the kit option extends to more models - we’d love to build our own Tesi (no brown seat).
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