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Pagani Zonda C12 Roadster

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Pagani Zonda C12 Roadster - information: Pagani Zonda C12 Roadster is a very good car, that was released by "Pagani" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Pagani Zonda C12 Roadster on this page.

Brand Name Pagani
Model Pagani Zonda C12 Roadster
Number of views 103177 views
Model's Rate 6.6 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • Audi Q7 e-tron 3.0 TDI quattro.

    You’ve probably already read about Audi’s grand plans for electrification of its model range, and soon it’ll have a second plug-in hybrid model to sell alongside the A3 e-tron launched earlier in the year. This time around the German firm has taken a different route, pairing the 3.0-litre TDI engine from the Q7 with a 126bhp electric motor, which together develop a mighty 369bhp and 516lb ft of torque. Owners will be able to travel up to around 34 miles, depending on the climate, which Audi reckons will be just enough for the daily commute to and from work for the average motorist. Three intelligent driving modes - EV, hybrid and battery hold - can work in tandem with the navigation system for best efficiency thanks to what Audi calls a predictive efficiency assistant. The price tag for all of this technology has yet to be revealed, but is expected to be Ј60k after Government grants, which is a hefty premium over the regular diesel editions. For anyone that’s expecting to see a whole load of electronic trickery, you’ll be disappointed, because the Q7 e-tron looks decidedly like any other diesel Q7, though the instruments have been altered to take into account of the electric motor, including the excellent Virtual Cockpit fitted to our test car. Beautifully finished, soft-touch materials are used throughout the cabin, delivering a high quality ambience. While the driving position is suitably command-like, the height of the dashboard is relatively low and so isn’t quite as imposing as other large SUVs. Supportive seats, a wide range of adjustments to both the chairs and the steering wheel mean that just about anyone can get a comfortable driving position. The cabin is simply huge, and whereas conventionally powered Q7s come with seven-seats as standard, due to the hybrid gubbins, there’s just five here. But that’s just fine as there’s generous space to spread out both front and rear. Boot space is inevitably smaller, but just 120 litre have been lost due to electrification. That still leaves a sizeable 650 litres with the seats up, and an expansive 1,835 litres with the chairs down. Performance is effortless, with smooth, linear acceleration no matter which source of power is being used. While in electric-mode, it’s eerily quiet, with only a distant sound from the tyres to be heard. The engine cuts in almost imperceptibly, with none of the vibrations that rival hybrids were afflicted with. Even with the diesel engine in action, sounds are nicely muted, with the cabin of the Q7 a calm place to travel. There’s a fluid feel to the steering with nice weighting that allows for accurate, precise cornering, and despite its bulk, this e-tron Q7 feels relatively light on its wheels. It handles flatly with little sign of body roll, backed up with huge amounts of grip. The only fly in the ointment is that of brake pedal feel that at times doesn’t inspire total confidence. Ride comfort is impressive, delivering a magic carpet-like ride from its adjustable adaptive suspension.
  • R nine T Scrambler.

    The R nine T Scrambler is a German take on scrambler styling that seems to have become the flavour of the season. This classic-looking bike is powered by a 1,170- cc air-cooled Boxer twin with 110 PS and 116 Nm of power and torque available at 7,750 RPM and 6,000 RPM respectively. The minimalistic design of the bike can be tweaked to suit one’s taste. To help with this, BMW Motorrad are offering a range of accessories and attachments - for instance, at the rear, a removable section of the sub-frame allows riders to use it for solo as well as pillion riding. Will it come to India? Stay tuned. If it does, we will get you that update.
  • THE FORGOTTEN TWIN.

    With naked bikes suddenly gaining favor with US consumers after decades of resistance, the manufacturers are tripping over themselves rushing bodywork-less bikes to the market. BMW already took advantage of its S 1000 four-cylinder platform to get into the action with its S 1000 R in 2014 , but ironically it’s already had a naked bike for years in boxer twin form. And with the R 1200 R finally getting the new-generation wasserboxer engine for 2015 (along with other upgrades), BMW has brought that model in as well to cover all its bases in the naked-bike arena. Utilizing the same DOHC, 1,170cc fl at opposed-twin powerplant that propels the latest R 1200 GS/GS Adventure, RT, and new RS model, the R 1200 R makes full use of the claimed 125 hp at 7,750 rpm and 92 footpounds of torque at 6,500 rpm. In fact, the R 1200 R is actually claimed to have slightly better torque at low rpm than the GS/GS Adventure and RT because of its different airbox and muffl er setup to work with the R’s naked styling. Add to that reduced weight to push around (the claimed curb weight of the R is 508 pounds, while the GS and GS Adventure weigh 525 and 573 pounds, respectively, and the RT scales in at 604 pounds) and you have the makings of a much livelier boxer twin. The new R 1200 R retains the standard ASC (Automatic Stability Control) system combining traction control and ABS, but it now includes two riding modes, Road and Rain, with Rain mode obviously tailoring the throttle response, power, and ASC for slippery conditions. There’s an optional Ride Modes Pro that employs an internal inertial motion sensor to offer additional Dynamic and User ride modes. Dynamic ride mode uses the lean angle sensor to tailor the traction control much better than the standard ASC and allows the throttle response to be much more direct, while User mode allows custom setup of the ride mode using any of the various parameters. For 2015, the R 1200 R gets a new tubular steel frame that jettisons front of the engine), with the Paralever single-sided swingarm rear suspension returning. Optional ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment) that allows tool-less spring preload and damping adjustments returns with the addition of the latest-generation Dynamic ESA that uses the aforementioned inertial motion sensor and a linear potentiometer on the shock to change damping at both ends automatically according to riding conditions. Dual 320mm discs and Brembo four-piston calipers handle braking duties up front, with a single 276mm disc and two-piston fl oating caliper out back. The R (in stock form, at least) is apparently aimed toward shorter riders, as not only was I able to easily put both feet fl at on the ground with my 30-inch inseam despite the listed 31-inch seat height, but legroom felt a bit cramped. Add the seemingly tall perch of the tapered aluminum conventional handlebar, and we thought perhaps our testbike might have been fitted with the accessory shorter seat (29.9 inches) by mistake, but it wasn’t. Anyone around 5-foot-7 or taller will likely want to fit the accessory “high rider’s” seat (32.3 inches) or “sport rider’s” seat (33 inches). There’s no doubt that the R model boxer has livelier acceleration than any of its other R 1200 series counterparts, a likely by-product of its lesser heft. The usual manageable grunt right off idle permits effortlessly rapid takeoffs from a stoplight, and there’s plenty of midrange punch to easily dart past traffic on the road or highway. Even in its latest-generation guise, the boxer doesn’t pretend to be a twin-cylinder superbike, so while the engine continues to make good power on up near its 8,000-rpm redline, it’s not as exciting as, say, Yamaha’s FZ-09 triple-but it does get the job done effi- ciently with little fuss. Throttle response was smooth and amiable in the Road setting (smooth enough that the muted response of the Rain mode isn’t necessary in our opinion); our test unit wasn’t equipped with the Riding Mode Pro option, so we weren’t able to experience the “direct” throttle response of the Dynamic mode. Our R model came equipped with the Dynamic ESA option, and we found it to work well at keeping the chassis composed during acceleration and braking while offering reasonable compliance on the highway. We’ve never been big fans of the Telelever front end because of the numb feedback it gives during corner entry, and there’s a definite improvement in front-end feel with the conventional inverted fork on the new R. Our only gripe would be some harshness over sharp-edged bumps in the Dynamic setting, which isn’t present in the Road damping setting. Steering is delightfully nimble yet stable and neutral, allowing quick line changes or traffic avoidance maneuvers with little effort. There’s also a decent amount of ground clearance, even with the standard centerstand. Braking from the ABS-equipped (which can be switched off) system is strong and responsive, hauling down the R easily with no drama. Aiding in that lack of drama was our R model’s Gear Shift Assistant Pro feature that allows clutchless downshifts as well as upshifts, permitting you to rapid-fire down through the gears without worrying about throttle blipping. And thankfully the version on the boxer isn’t plagued with the vague feel and action of the S 1000 unit. At $13,950 for the base version (with optional packages boosting the price to more than $17,000 ), the BMW R 1200 R certainly isn’t for the average naked-bike rider. It’s obviously not the most powerful, the most stylish, or the most economical machine in the class. But if you love that boxer twin power and handling along with a good dose of modern technology in a roadster design, the R 1200 R is certainly worth a look.
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