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Pagani Zonda R

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Pagani Zonda R - information: Pagani Zonda R is a very good car, that was released by "Pagani" company. We collected the best 8 photos of Pagani Zonda R on this page.

Brand Name Pagani
Model Pagani Zonda R
Number of views 80391 views
Model's Rate 8.6 out of 10
Number of images 8 images
Interesting News
  • DS 4.

    Little more than a year after Citroen announced that it would be spinning off its DS cars into a separate luxury subbrand, the French firm has facelifted half of its line-up, with both the DS 4 and flagship DS 5 sporting the company’s new corporate nose treatment. The rest of the range, namely the DS 3 supermini and Cabrio, will get an update within weeks, adopting a similarly bold front end that will also see the end of the double chevrons adorning the car, as has been done with the DS 4 and DS 5. While the UK is the biggest single market for the DS 3, there’s still some work to be done on the rest of the range, but the newly formed firm is hoping that revisions to the DS 4, including a realignment of its market positioning will transform sales. DS Automobiles is looking to attract two different sets of buyers for the newly revised DS 4, with the regular DS 4 riding lower compared to before, while the new Crossback model is aimed at the crossover market thanks to its raised ride height of 30 millimetres, and more rugged, off-road inspired styling cues. At the car’s international launch a couple of months ago, we focused upon the DS 4 Crossback edition, but now with the first examples arriving in UK showrooms, we were able to spend time behind the wheel of the DS 4 Prestige, paired to the flagship 178bhp BlueHDi engine. One of the biggest criticisms of the outgoing DS 4 was its unyielding ride and we’re pleased to say that ride comfort has been transformed on the new car. Deep ruts and potholes are tackled with ease, and there’s no need to brace yourself like you needed to do with the old car. Steering feel is particularly agile with lots of feel, with the DS 4 asserting itself as being different from the humdrum hatchback segment. Through the bends there’s minimal body lean and a decent amount of grip, inspiring confidence in more challenging corners. While it doesn’t offer the same kind of driver satisfaction as Ford’s Focus, there’s reasonable agility and the experience is reassuringly safe and predictable. The engine is quiet and refined, only becoming heard when you really gun the right hand pedal, and while there’s a fair amount of road noise on noisier surfaces, wind noise isn’t intrusive. Away from the lights there’s decent pace, with smooth gearshifts from the six-speed automatic transmission. The brakes deliver good bite, though beware if you have anything larger than average sized feet, as the space in the foot well is at a premium. There’s very little room between the centre console and the clutch pedal on manual gearbox variants, and it’s all too easy to get your size tens stuck uncomfortably, and then there’s a mad scramble to get the clutch down in time for you to stop. It’s a good reason why you’re better off opting for the automatic variants in preference to the manual versions. Apart from revisions to the dashboard to incorporate a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system, and the first time that Apple CarPlay has been seen in a PSA Peugeot-Citroen-DS product, it’s business as usual. So that means a nicely appointed cabin with surfaces that are a cut above the norm in the medium car segment. The trademark DS watchstrap-inspired leather upholstery is on offer and looks sensational. There’s squidgy materials used for the dashboard, but disappointingly the door tops are hard plastic unless you opt for the uprated leather trim. The instruments where you can change the backlighting are a nice touch, and all of the controls are neatly positioned up high for ease of use. You’ll need to be a contortionist to use the USB socket, or have small hands, though, because it’s awkwardly positioned on the centre console. And that’s particularly disappointing as the use of Apple’s CarPlay depends on you being able to plug in your iPhone via the USB socket. The newly introduced touchscreen is easy to use and nicely positioned just within your field of vision. While it isn’t the most responsive system around, it’s certainly no better or worse than some rival systems. Our test car came equipped with the distinctive watchstrap upholstery and comfort and lateral support is simply excellent. It’s also easy to adjust the seats to gain a good position, though the steering wheel always feels like it is positioned too close. Space up front is pretty good, apart from the aforementioned pedal problems, while at the rear there’s surprisingly more space than you expect. Once installed in the back, knee and headroom is actually alright, though it can be a bit of challenge to get in and out. Those shapely styled rear doors come to a point, and if you’re not careful you could do someone a mischief. Space around the cabin for oddments is generally good, with a decent-sized tray in front of the gear lever and well-proportioned door pockets. While vision out of the front of the car is good, thick rear pillars and a shallow rear window make manoeuvring more of a challenge. It’s therefore pleasing that all DS 4s come with rear parking sensors for added reassurance. Boot space is well proportioned at 385 litres, though you’ll have to get over the high sill first. The optional Denon audio system restricts space a little, but the seats are easy to fold down with the pull of a lever. With the launch of the new DS 4, prices have increased a notch due to realignment of the model range. Where the previous DSign model offered an attractive entry price to DS 4 ownership, it wasn’t particularly well equipped, something you can’t level at all models of this latest DS 4 range. For instance, all versions come with DAB digital radio, a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system, dual-zone climate control, rear privacy glass, cruise control and automatic headlights and wipers.
  • EXPOSITION SUZUKI.

    Suzuki celebrated 30 years of the GSX-R750 at the show, but focused on the entire company heritage with bikes ranging from the 1963 T10 250cc twin through to the latest GSX-R racer in the World Endurance series. Meliand brought the team’s ’83 Herve Moineau/Richard Hubin, title-winning GS1000. The aluminium box-frame machine was the precursor to the GSX-R750 launched in 1975. The stand was very much racing driven with a 1983 Wes Cooley-style Yoshimura GS1000 (right), ex-Marco Luchinelli XR14 RG500, ex-Jack Findlay.
  • Ford B-MAX Tita nium 1.5 TDCi.

    While Ford has been busy replacing most of its MPV range, with all-new S-MAX and Galaxy models, as well a substantial facelift to the C-MAX, the baby B-MAX has soldiered on. It’s the only model, apart from the Ka, not to have adopted Ford’s wide mouthed, Aston Martinesque grille, though it only has to be a matter of time before a facelifted version arrives. In the meantime, Ford has replaced its 1.6-litre TDCi engine with a downsized, identically powered 1.5-litre unit that manages to be 3.7mpg more economical, with CO2 emissions that are 6g/km less and with an acceleration to 62mph time that is just under a second faster. And the price for all of these improvements, a modest Ј130. At its launch, the B-MAX won plaudits for its interesting sliding rear doors that leave a pillarless space when both front and rear doors are open. It makes loading little’uns into the child seats in the back a breeze, especially in tightly proportioned car parks. That combined with generous head and legroom both front and rear, this is one seriously spacious car, despite its modest footprint. The dashboard is attractively styled with all of the controls logically arranged, though we think it’s a shame that there are so many tiny buttons on the audio system. The optional navigation system is hindered by a small screen, albeit with excellent colourful graphics, we just wish there was more of it. Still, it’s neatly positioned just within your eye line. The dashboard materials are made out of decent plastics and feel well appointed, though it’s a disappointment that the door tops are made out of hard materials. The driving position is best described as command, with a good view out along the bonnet. In fact, all round vision is pretty good, thanks to deep windows, except for the super wide central door pillars. Boot space is smaller than most of its immediate rivals, but thanks to a low sill and wide opening, you can make good use of the available room. There’s extra underfloor storage and the seats fold down totally flat. With just 94bhp on tap, you’re not likely to win any traffic light Grand Prix, and it’s surprising that Ford doesn’t offer the more powerful 118bhp edition of this engine for extra zip. It’s a quiet unit, though, and is only really noticeable at higher revs, though at motorway speeds it’s barely audible. Besides, the sound is drowned out by the excessive road noise and fluttering of the wind around the windscreen. As you would expect from a Blue Oval-badged car, it’s the driving experience that really excels, with communicative, agile steering and while there’s some lean when cornering, on account of its tall sides, everything is kept well in check, with generous amounts of grip. But it’s the ride comfort that is at odds with the high degree of comfort that the B-MAX otherwise delivers, with a firm edge to the suspension that results in too many of the road imperfections being transmitted into the cabin. The slick, smooth five-speed manual gearbox is a delight to use and has a light clutch as a companion. Gear ratios are well thought out, allowing you to make reasonable progress even considering the modest power and size of the engine.
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