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Panhard & Levassor 16 CV Landaulet

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Panhard & Levassor 16 CV Landaulet - information: Panhard & Levassor 16 CV Landaulet is a very good car, that was released by "Panhard & Levassor" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Panhard & Levassor 16 CV Landaulet on this page.

Brand Name Panhard & Levassor
Model Panhard & Levassor 16 CV Landaulet
Number of views 72023 views
Model's Rate 7.8 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • NORTON FLAT TRACK.

    This modern Norton dirt track custom is the work of Jamie Ireson’s 72Motorcycles, in collaboration with Norton Motorcycles - a tribute to the 1970s RonWood racing machine that won three Ascot track championship titles and was taken to a National dirt track victory by Alex Jorgenson. Based on a newCommando 961, it was recently launched at Motorcycle Live on the official NortonMotorcycles stand as the first of a limited edition run of 12. Ireson said: “The project started whenmy partnerMerryMichau photographed the 2014 Norton brochure. She toldNorton CEO Stuart Garner that I build custombikes and it went from there. Stuart asked us to come up with some ideas and it turned out that we had the same thoughts on building a custombike based on RonWood’s dirt tracker. Ireson is a design engineer by trade and used his experience gained in the automotive industry to model the bike in CAD before committing to metal. “The one thing we needed to do was lower the bike, and working in CAD with models that Norton supplied allowedme to see what effect that had.” That was November 2014 but it took until June 2015 for the project to take off. “Norton sent me a rolling chassis and engine unit with the only stipulation being that the bike had to be ready forMotorcycle Live at the NEC,” says Jamie. The engine and transmission are standard 961, as is the main frame, but Jamie modified the rear end. He says: “The RonWood bike has a really small oil tank, because it’s designed to only do a small number of laps. I cut off the end off the original tank, made up some bends on a CNCmachine and got themwelded up to follow the lines of Ron Wood’s [oil-carrying] frame.” According to Jamie, the standard Norton chassis geometry is slap bang in the middle of what is considered an ideal flat track set-up, but this build had to retain the standard 17in wheels. The swingarm is also standard, but with added bracing. The standard Ohlins forks were too long so Jamie opted for shorter, larger-diameter 58mm Ducati Panigale forks which slot into new yokes made from Jamie’s CAD drawings by Fastec Racing in Suffolk, who also did machining work on footpeg mounts and the velocity stacks. Jamie produced a buck for the tank, from which Parker Fabrication in Bournemouth produced the alloy tank. “The inspiration of the Ron Wood bike was the gorgeous red paintwork and tank graphics. We talked with out painters, Image Design, about giving it a modern twist, but they said it was so good we should leave it. The only change is using the current Norton logo.” The engine is standard, but Jamie’s removed the original airbox, so: “we might pick up anything between five and 10bhp.” The exhaust follows the same lines as the Ron Wood bike. It’s all custom made and hand-rolled by Tom at Foundry Motorcycles. The pipes have been given a super hard-wearing ceramic-coated black by Wes at Hi-Spec Coatings in West Sussex. Lasertech Engineering did all the frame welding. The Norton 961 MM Flat Track is priced at ?30,000. “All 12 will be identical except for the number,” says Jamie. “We’ve got 44. We’re keeping this original bike. Customers can have any number, but we won’t use one number twice.”
  • MIDSIZE ROLE PLAYER.

    The naked standard motorcycle category appears to have finally taken hold in the US, due in large part to the sales success of Yamaha’s bombshell FZ-09. After Suzuki’s challenge to the Yamaha triple (“Budget Blasters,” October/November 2015), now Kawasaki is jumping into the middleweight standard fray by bringing its Z800 ABS to the US market for 2016. Well, 49 states for now; California residents unfortunately won’t get the bike yet due to the added emissions requirements. Available since 2013 in other markets, the Z800 is powered by a liquidcooled, DOHC, 806cc inline-four that is basically a bored-out, upgraded version of the old Z750 engine. A 2.6mm-larger bore with 10-percent-lighter pistons getting cooled by larger oil jets, revised intake/exhaust ports, longer intake manifolds, and a staggered intake funnel setup along with 2mm-larger throttle bodies (now 34mm) boosts peak horsepower by a claimed 6 hp to a 111 hp peak in European tune (Kawasaki USA wasn’t listing power figures). Longer exhaust header pipes with equalizer tubes between cylinders and an exhaust valve in the under-engine chamber help midrange power. The European press has had plenty of good things to say about the Z800’s engine, and after a day spent riding in the streets of Palm Springs and up in the canyons of the San Jacinto mountain range, we’d heartily agree. There’s plenty of responsive low-end and midrange acceleration, aided in part by the change to a two-teeth-larger rear sprocket. While not quite up to the sprightly FZ-09 as far as overall power in the bottom half of the rev range, the Kawasaki towers over the GSX-S750 when it comes to response from the engine room. Power continues to build as rpm rises into the five-digit zone before tapering off slightly as the Z800’s engine approaches its rev limiter around 12,000 rpm, but there’s enough top-end power to be had without revving it that far, and wheelies are but a clutch-snap away. The Z750’s steel backbone frame was revised with two bolt-on aluminum subframe sections that allow the Z800’s front engine mounts to be positioned behind the cylinders. While Kawasaki says this allows the vibration from the inline-four to be isolated more effectively, some vibes can definitely be felt through the handlebar and footpegs above 7,500 rpm. Nonetheless, the Z800 has a nice, neutral yet fairly agile feel in the corners, with only a little effort required to fl ick the bike into a corner. Line changes in midcorner are easily accomplished with zero drama, and the stock Dunlop OEM-spec D214 Sportmax tires display good grip and light steering characteristics. There’s plenty of ground clearance, and the standard KYB suspension components on the Kawasaki-a 43mm inverted fork (adjustable for spring preload on one side and rebound damping on the other) and single rear shock (also adjustable for spring preload and rebound damping)-provide good wheel and chassis control even when the pace heats up. The ride is a little firm for pothole-ridden urban tarmac and highway superslab but nothing drastic. Despite the budget-looking standard-mount two-piece Nissin calipers, the brakes work well. Response is a little fl at, but power and feel are surprisingly good, with the 310mm discs likely helping by providing good leverage for the calipers. And the standard Nissin ABS works well too, with a fairly high intervention point and transparent action overall. Probably a good thing, as those brakes need to slow down around 509 pounds with a full fuel tank; even though it carries that weight well, the Z800’s heft is our only real gripe with the Kawasaki. Ergos are average standard bike fare, with a slight sporty cant to your upper torso offsetting the windblast. At $8,399, the Kawasaki Z800 ABS is a touch more expensive than the non-ABS-equipped Yamaha FZ-09 ($8,190) or the Suzuki GSX-S750 ($7,999 for the base model). But its solid performance definitely makes it worth a look in the middleweight standard category.
  • The science and silence of AMG.

    AMG chairman Tobias Moers has revealed to Wheels that AMG is shifting its focus away from power and on to sharper dynamics for its future models. This means the introduction of high-tech systems such as active aerodynamics, four-wheel steering and even a Drift Mode function as AMG moves into a new battleground in the war for performance car ascendency. AMG has long held a power advantage over its rivals at BMW’s M Division and Audi RS, and Moers says the focus is now on finessing how that prodigious grunt is sent to the road. “It’s not my target to be the most powerful car,” he said. “The target is to be the best driving car. The next step is to be more active, with more active systems like active aero, and to be more active with kinematics.” Moers revealed AMG is well advanced in developing a range of active systems, most of which will debut on the much-hyped road-legal version of the AMG GT3 racing car due later this year. Expected to be badged as the GT R, Moers says the Porsche 911 GT3 rival “will signal the next step for AMG.” It’s also likely to be the first AMG to utilise four-wheel steering. “We discussed active technology earlier, and this will be one of those systems,” Moers told us. “It will help to increase high-speed stability, yaw damping at high speed, and you can increase agility in the car as well. It’s good technology.” The GT R, which is in the final stages of development, takes heavy inspiration from the GT3 racer (pictured) and will include a more aggressive, track-inspired body kit, dominated by a larger rear spoiler and front splitter. Moers hinted this makes the GT R the ideal model to debut active aerodynamic components to improve dynamics. The GT R will also be lighter than the 1570kg AMG GT S, boast wider tracks front and rear, and could produce as much as 415kW from its 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8. Moers wouldn’t be drawn on the GT R’s potential power output, but did say “we have plenty of room to grow [with the 4.0-litre engine].” Currently the 4.0-litre V8 produces 375kW/750Nm in the AMG GT S. Future models will see AMG step even further along the hightech route. Moers revealed he sees a future where AMG models are powered purely by electricity and confirmed his engineers are already developing electric drivetrains that could manifest in a number of different forms. “Electrification makes more sense to me than performance diesels,” he said. “We are looking at everything from plug-in hybrids to pure electric and electric turbos because we are not in position to exclude something from our portfolio. So we’ll do work on several programs at once to find our own path on electrification for the future.” But while Moers sees electrification as inevitable, he’s quick to assure AMG fans that future electric models will retain the brand’s character. “Sound is crucial to AMG, so we will find a solution,” he said. “We found one with the SLS Electric Drive and we know it’s important.” The 552kW SLS AMG Electric Drive, which in 2013 claimed the title as the world’s quickest production electric car with a 0-100km/h sprint of 3.9sec, pumped artificial noise into the cabin during acceleration via its audio system. What’s unlikely to have a long future is AMG’s mighty 12-cylinder engine. Moers confirmed that AMG’s iconic 6.0-litre twin-turbo V12 is under threat due to evertightening emission laws. “We do have V12 aficionados worldwide who want us to keep it, but the V12 segment no longer represents AMG as a brand. There are customers that are very interested in that engine in that exclusive segment, so we are responsible for engineering a V12 and it’s up to us to give the V12 a future. But that’s not decided.” Moers said recent changes to China’s emissions rules have placed the V12’s future in jeopardy. “That’s giving us a big headache with the V12, so it’s a question of how we proceed. That’s what we’re discussing in the company now.”
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