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Panhard & Levassor 24hp

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Panhard & Levassor 24hp - information: Panhard & Levassor 24hp is a very good car, that was released by "Panhard & Levassor" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Panhard & Levassor 24hp on this page.

Brand Name Panhard & Levassor
Model Panhard & Levassor 24hp
Number of views 100742 views
Model's Rate 8.1 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • BIG BIKE VS. SMALL BIKE.

    We see it quite often at the racetrack, especially in club races where classes are mixed: Rider on small bike passes rider on big bike in seemingly every corner, only to be passed back right away on the next straight. Even if the power difference is not that great between the two bikes, the contrast between corner speed and straightaway speed of the two bikes becomes magnified as each bike is ridden to maximize its advantages. The reality of the situation is that the outright maximum cornering speed between any two bikes is not that significantly different, provided both are on similar tires. If the tires are similar, both bikes should be capable of the same lateral acceleration (limited by the friction coefficient of the tires) and corner speed. Why do we see such a contrast in how the bikes are ridden? On an underpowered bike, the quickest way around the track is to maximize corner speed, in turn getting onto each straight with as much speed as possible. This is accomplished by completing the corner with as large an arc as possible, which converts lateral acceleration into maximum corner speed. For a typical single-radius corner, this means entering as wide as possible to maximize entry speed, turning in to the apex with little trail- braking, and keeping the bike at maximum lean with a constant radius until the very exit of the corner. In contrast, the quickest lap times on a more powerful bike are usually found by maximizing acceleration onto each straight and taking advantage of that power; this is achieved by sacrificing some corner speed to pick the bike up and apply the throttle earlier at the exit. For that same single-radius corner, this means a tighter entry, more trail-braking to a slightly later apex, with a tighter arc and less corner speed to get the bike up off the side of the tire as quickly as possible. As we found out in our displacement test last year where we compared the Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R750, and Kawasaki ZX-10R, it’s not so much that the smaller bikes have a handling advantage over the bigger bikes but rather it’s how each bike is ridden to play to its strength or weakness in the power department. Using data from our AiM Solo GPS lap timer, we could see differences in line and cornering speeds between the three bikes, just as you would expect given the horsepower of each. While a few horsepower here or there might not seem like it should impact line choice signifi- cantly, in practice even a small difference can significantly change how a particular corner or series of corners is negotiated. And the contrast between a lightweight bike and a literbike can be astonishing: We’ve encountered certain corners where the entry line is several feet different on an SV650 than it is on a 1000, for an example. Finding the optimum line to match the power of your bike does require some experimentation. The wide radius and high corner speed that less powerful bikes require typically brings with it a higher risk of a high-side crash in the middle of the corner just as the throttle is opened, and the safer option is to start with the tighter entry and lower corner speed of the big-bike line and work from there, adding more corner speed and a wider entry with practice. If you are looking at sector times on data, don’t forget to factor in any time gained or lost on the succeeding straight, which may or may not offset time saved in the corner itself. Given the contrast in lines between different bikes, the key point to remember is that the optimum line for your bike may be very different from the bike in front of you, and it’s quite often a mistake to blindly follow another rider at the track. Even if you are riding the same model of bike, the power difference may be enough that you can take advantage of a different line to be quicker, and that line may work to a further advantage when it comes time to make a pass. When you ride at the track, what bike you are on will at least in part determine what lines you should be taking, and you should try different options with that in mind. And if you change bikes and move to a more or less powerful machine- or even make modifications to the same bike for more power-know that the lines you had been using for years might need to be altered appropriately.
  • RECREATING HISTORY.

    A stunningMoto Guzzi V8 works racer replica looks certain to steal the show at Coys sale at theMCNLondonMotorcycle Show at Excel on February 13. The bike was built in the early 2000s by ex-factory technicians with access to original drawings and spares to use as patterns to make new components. Coys haven’t provided an estimate but, with only two original V8 racers existing, the parade-ready replica should attract a three-figure sum. Other bikes from the same Italian collection to be offered at Excel include a gorgeous 1957 Ducati 125cc Bialbero racer (estimate ?65,000-70,000), a rare 1955 100cc Cecatto Bialbero racer (?29,000-35,000), a 1938 250cc Benelli Bialbero race bike (?48,000-52,000) and a 1931 1300cc Indian Type 402 four, fully restored in 2010 with minimal mileage since (?55,000-65,000). Entries for the capital’s only motorcycle-only sale scheduled for 2016 are still open and the catalogue - which will be available on January 25 - closes on January 19. Entry fees are ?350 per bike and buyers’ and sellers’ commission is set at 10% plus VAT. Over 100 lots are promised for the sale, which starts at 2.30pm on Saturday February 13 (viewing from February 12). Potential vendors contact Anthony Godin (07854 213928 or 0208 614 7888).
  • Cops chase new cars.

    MERCEDES-Benz, Audi, BMW, Volvo, Subaru and Volkswagen are on Australian police force wish lists as the search begins for a highway patrol car to replace the current fleet of locally produced Holdens and Fords. SUVs are shaping as the likely participants in future highspeed chases as local police look to follow the high-riding road travelled by American cops. The Subaru Forester tS, Mercedes-AMG GLA45, BMW X3 and Jeep Grand Cherokee SRT are all being considered following the release of a detailed set of draft “national vehicle specifications” for pursuit cars as replacements for the Commodore SS and Falcon XR6 Turbo/XR8. Each achieves the police target of accelerating to 100km/h in less than 7.5sec while providing space for gear and people. SUVs also provide better ground clearance for hopping median strips or driving on the verges of country roads. And the extra traction of all-wheel drive provides reassurance - and pace - in slippery conditions. Police insiders Wheels spoke to confirmed SUVs were one option being considered. Victoria Police has already purchased some Grand Cherokee SRTs for use in undercover work. BMW produces police versions of its 2 Series Gran Tourer, 3 Series, 5 Series, X1, X3 and X5 for emergency services around the world. “We’re definitely interested in it … we are speaking to the police at the moment,” BMW Australia director of corporate affairs Lenore Fletcher said. “We have many high-powered performance vehicles - including X models - that would be well suited to police work.” MB Australia senior manager of corporate communications David McCarthy said the chances of a GLA45 AMG pursuit car would depend on supply. “If they want the cars, we have to be able to provide the volume,” he said, adding that Mercedes would not produce a specific trim or tune for police. “We’re not going to reduce the spec … that can have implications on used-car prices and the brand image.” Wheels understands police have pressured some manufacturers to take out luxury components to make cars more affordable, but most brands appear reluctant. Police are also asking for modifications - including electronics, pre-drilled holes in the roof and the fitment of full-sized spare tyres - from the factory, something that may not be feasible for many models. Police are also considering high-performance sedans and wagons for highway patrol duties, including the Volvo S60 Polestar, Audi A4/S4, BMW 3 Series and Volkswagen Golf R. While, on the surface, the chances of a Mercedes, BMW, Audi or Volvo police car may seem slim due to their premium price tags, police are keen to consider the whole-of-life cost of all vehicles. Given that depreciation is typically the single biggest cost of any new vehicle, some police jurisdictions are pushing their accounting departments to consider resale values, servicing costs and low fuel use, potentially opening the door to more luxurious alternatives. As part of the draft requirements - which Wheels has seen - police are also probing carmakers as to “the extent that the manufacturer can modify or build vehicles to meet the draft specifications”. Overseas, Mercedes and BMWs are relatively common for police use, and BMW even has a range of ‘Authority’ models designed specifically for emergency services.
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