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Panoz Esperante

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Panoz Esperante - information: Panoz Esperante is a very good car, that was released by "Panoz" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Panoz Esperante on this page.

Brand Name Panoz
Model Panoz Esperante
Number of views 103848 views
Model's Rate 8.1 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • TRK 502.

    The Benelli TRK 502, which is also bound for our shores, will be a potent addition to the already formidable Benelli line-up in India. In a country where motorcycle touring is the primary form of leisure biking, the TRK 502 with its 47.6-PS and 45-Nm 500-cc liquid-cooled parallel twin (the same as in the Leoncino) and 20-litre petrol tank will definitely appeal to a whole new range of consumers. The bike features USD front forks and a rear monoshock, both with 150 mm of travel, in order to provide as plush a ride quality over long journeys as possible. The bike will also be available in a more off-road orientated version. Unlike the Tornado 302 and the Leoncino this bike will not be coming to India until the second half of 2016, which is when it will also be launched globally.
  • Porsche North America Racing achieve podiums at Daytona.

    Porsche North America Racing started the 2016 WeatherTech United SportsCar Championship with a third place finish in the GTLM class at the 54th Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona. The no.912 Porsche 911 RSR of Earl Bamber, Frйdйric Makowiecki and Michael Christensen battled through an unusually attritional race to take the final step on the podium, although it was nearly so much more for the factory Porsche squad. A wet qualifying session on the Thursday, disrupted by torrential rain, saw the no.911 and no.912 Porsches lock out the front row of the grid in the hands of Nick Tandy and Makowiecki respectively. Such was the GTLM field’s dominance in the wet, the two 911 RSRs actually set the fastest times overall but, thanks to IMSA’s rules, would be forced to start behind the prototype machinery. During the race’s opening hour, Tandy (as is now becoming customary in the USCC) raced into an early lead as the no.912 dropped back into a dogfight with the works Corvettes and BMWs. By the six-hour mark, the two factory Porsches crossed the line onetwo, with the no.911 still narrowly leading. However, through the night - heavily disrupted by multiple full-course caution periods - the momentum swung toward the no. 912 RSR. By dawn, the 54th Rolex 24 had boiled down to a battle between the two Porsches and the no.3 and no.4 Corvette duo. But, with Kйvin Estre at the wheel, the no.911 slowed dramatically on the banking with around five hours to go, a broken driveshaft forcing a lengthy stop for repairs leaving the no.912 to battle on alone. Patrick Pilet would eventually re-emerge in the 2015 championship-winning entry to help it on its way to some useful points in eighth place. After the final round of stops inside the last hour, Bamber found himself once again in the class lead. However, after being hunted down by Oliver Gavin in the no.4 Corvette, the Kiwi racer was nudged out of the lead at the turn five hairpin. With around 20 minutes remaining, the second Chevrolet - in the hands of Antonio Garcia - also found a way through, this time at the Bus Stop chicane, leaving Bamber to watch on as the two Corvettes fought it out for victory. Despite coming close, the two GM cars never came to blows, as Bamber brought the no.912 machine home in third for the crew’s first podium since ViR last August.
  • SCRAMBLER CLASSIC.

    Ducati’s new Scrambler range is a trip down memory lane. A modern tribute to the care-free, halcyon days of the original Scrambler, which was born in 1962. Born free, in fact, as is engraved on the fuel cap. Sweet touches like that bring a smile to my face and encourage me to mentally unshackle from the putrid and mayhem filled realities of the so-called modern world. The Scrambler Classic is the machine to do it on. So easy to ride. Easy on the eye. Comfortable. Inspiring in a fashion that is not bent towards velocity. You don’t have to try and be fast on one. Just take it easy, dude, enjoy the ride and pass it on. The new Scrambler has an extra cylinder and a fair bit more capacity over its distant predecessor, using the reliable and effervescent 803cc air-cooled Desmo two-valve engine. The motor yields an excellent mix of easily accessible power and consistent torque that is further bolstered by well matched gearbox ratios. The bike is ultra-narrow and low in the seat, and all controls are easy to use and light to the touch, making it an attractive prospect to whatever your gender. With a slight weight of 170kg to lug, the Scrambler is certainly a zesty little number, but not intimidating. That’s what its all about, man. The diamond stitched and suitably well-used couch brown seat, spoked wheels, brushed aluminium tank covers and cow-horn ‘bars scream vintage and do a good job of hiding the machine’s actual modernity. If you look more closely there are other nice touches, like the aluminium guards, machined engine covers and tidy exhaust plumbing. It is touted as a fashion and lifestyle statement, again like its daddy, and is effective in this regard. Ducati know this, of course, and have an entire wardrobe available pour femme et homme. Handling is pretty darn good. The 18in front and relatively high profile tyres tend to slow direction changes, but this is well compensated by the handlebars, light weight and general rider ergonomics. It’s a willing performer in the curves too, with good clearance and confident corner tracking. The relatively soft suspension is not complex and provides decent stroke for absorbing corrugations. The overall comfort helps alleviate some of the effects of “hanging out in the wind” a bit, too. Brakes, which feature the miracle of ABS and “radial” caliper mounting, are effective but feel wooden, like old Brembos do. The dash is suitably sparse, but a disappointment - there is nothing analogue in it and it is not easily read, which is a shame. But in keeping with the peace, love and good happiness stuff theme, I can forgive and even forget. Overall, the Scrambler is a great little machine that is rewarding as much as it is pleasing to ride. Just hop on and go - it’s that easy. It is destined to be a hit with many people seeking a bike that is functional and places the rider in a more restful universe.
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