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Polski Fiat 125p Coupé

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Polski Fiat 125p Coupé - information: Polski Fiat 125p Coupé is a very good car, that was released by "Polski Fiat" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Polski Fiat 125p Coupé on this page.

Brand Name Polski Fiat
Model Polski Fiat 125p Coupé
Number of views 80762 views
Model's Rate 9.2 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • 2016 YAMAHAS.

    New, More Affordable R1S If there is any one downside to the continued evolution of sportbikes it’s cost: The more advanced production motorcycles become, the more expensive they become as well. And while for some that trade-off is justifiable, there are still those consumers who simply aren’t willing to gut their bank account for the exotic materials and technologies that make modern motorcycles the track weapons they are today. For those consumers, Yamaha has introduced its YZF-R1S, which uses cost-effective materials to cut the suggested retail price of the otherwise stellar R1 by $1,500, to “just” $14,990. If your immediate thought is that Yamaha must have taken everything that made the R1 great and thrown it out the door (electronics included), then rest assured that’s not necessarily the case. Instead, with the R1S, Yamaha has gone in and replaced the titanium connecting rods with steel ones and magnesium outer parts and fasteners like the oil pan and right-side engine covers to aluminum ones. Engine cover bolts are now steel instead of aluminum, while wheels are now manufactured from aluminum instead of magnesium and wrapped in Bridgestone Battlax S20 sport tires instead of the R1/R1M’s trackday-intentioned RS10s. The exhaust header piping is also now made from stainless steel rather than titanium. The overall result of all this material swapping is a 9-pound jump in claimed curb weight. The R1/R1M’s MotoGP-inspired electronics package with power modes, traction control, slide control, launch control, and wheelie control goes untouched, though on the R1S, the quickshifter will come as an option rather than as standard equipment. There are a few other changes, including updates to the ECU that are intended to suit the new engine specification. The switch to steel connecting rods from titanium in the R1S means the redline needed to be reduced, the result being slightly less top-end power than the standard R1. Yamaha has yet to quote any numbers, but in published dyno charts (which are devoid of any numbers), it appears that the R1S’s redline is at 12,500 rpm instead of the R1’s 14,000 rpm, with the power loss at the very top around 5 or so horsepower. The R1S is available in either a red/white/ black color scheme or matte gray motif, and the bike is expected to be available beginning in February. New XSR 900 and Updated FJR 1300 The growing “hipster/caf? racer” culture is catching the attention of the OEMs, with Yamaha and its new XSR900 for 2016 being the latest example. The XSR retains the FZ-09’s excellent 847cc crossplane three-cylinder engine and Controlled Filling Die-Cast aluminum frame and swingarm with adjustable KYB suspension but adds styling components and details that harken back to the “heritage, authenticity, and simplicity” of the sporting motorcycles from the ’70s and ’80s. The XSR gets the FZ’s three YCC-T (Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle) riding modes, but it also gets a two-level (plus off) traction control system as well as ABS as standard equipment. An assist/ slipper clutch eases lever effort by a claimed 20 percent while also helping to smooth out downshifts. Everything else mechanically (save for suspension settings) is basically identical to the FZ. Ergonomically, the XSR’s 32.7-inch seat height is 15mm higher than the FZ’s, and the rider’s seating position is moved 50mm rearward to make for a slightly more aggressive riding posture. Styling is the XSR’s main focus. There’s plenty of nice metal bracketry and components where plastic or other materials would normally be used. For example, the nice-looking fuel tank cover on the matte gray/ aluminum version (there’s also one in the 60th Anniversary yellow/black traditional Yamaha motif) is a brushed-aluminum piece that Yamaha says has an actual hand-buffed finish. A single round halogen headlight is held by aluminum brackets, and a round LED taillight mounted atop a metal (aluminum) fender replicate the look of the ’70s caf? racer. The seat features burgundy-colored faux suede leather panels and red stitching. The single round instrument gauge recalls the older style in shape, but in function it jumps to present-day technology with a full LCD info panel. All told, the XSR900 comes in 16 pounds heavier than the FZ-09 according to Yamaha, at a claimed 430 pounds full of fuel. The matte gray/aluminum XSR900 will be available in April, while the 60th Anniversary version will be available slightly later this year in May. Also new for 2016 from Yamaha is the latest FJR1300, in both A (standard) and ES (Electronic Suspension) models. The biggest change for both editions is a six-speed transmission replacing the old five-speed, with a slipper/assist clutch. A new LED headlight and taillight along with slightly revised bodywork complete the revisions for the A model, while the ES gets all that plus a new “lean-angle sensitive” cornering LED light setup that uses three LEDs on each side above the quad-element headlights that light up progressively as the bike leans to more effectively illuminate the road ahead in corners. The 2016 FJR will be available in March; no prices for either the new FJR1300 or XSR900 were available at press time.
  • VAUXHALL.

    When the Astra Sports Tourer was first announced, Vauxhall boasted efficiency of 99g/km for the 1.0i Turbo ecoFLEX editions and an even lower 96g/km for the Easytronic automated manual versions. But with homologation now complete, those figures have crept up by 1g/km with the official figures declared as 100 and 97g/km, respectively. The latter version sees a change in official fuel economy figures that are quoted, too, with 67.3mpg listed, as opposed to 68.9mpg before. These changes mean that for company car users, the manual gearbox version at 100g/km increases by one benefit-in-kind band to 18 per cent, compared to 17 per cent previously, while Easytronic versions stay the same as before. The prices are unchanged, too, with the Astra Sports Tourer Design 1.0i Turbo ecoFLEX priced at Ј17,285, rising to Ј17,985 for the better equipped Tech Line version. The load-lugging Astra Sports Tourer is set to arrive in UK showrooms in February.
  • MAKE MINE A “SUPERMID”.

    Just as it did in 2015 with the 1299 Panigale, Ducati has upped the ante in 2016 with the smaller Panigale, giving the previous 899 the same stroke measurement as the 1299 to create the new 959 Panigale. Ducati wanted to ensure that the “supermid” Panigale kept pace with its bigger brother, so it invited the world’s motorcycling media to the Circuit de la Comunitat Valenciana Ricardo Tormo in Valencia, Spain, to let us find out. Looking at the updates, they are minimal but important, with the engine’s slight increase in stroke from 57.2mm to 60.8mm (resulting in a total displacement of 955cc) necessitating a new crankshaft and connecting rods. The piston crowns are slightly different, while strict Euro 4 noise emissions standards required the fitment of a different exhaust system with dual muffl ers on the right side (thankfully absent from US models), along with ribbing on the cylinder heads and valve covers, and a different cam chain. Exhaust diameter was increased from 55mm to 60mm, while on the intake side, the 62mm oval throttle bodies now feature dual injectors. The clutch now has the slipper/assist function from the 1299 that provides lighter lever action and smoother downshifting when riding aggressively. Meanwhile, thanks to the bike employing the same cast-aluminum monocoque two-piece frame that uses the engine as a structural member, changes on the chassis side are limited to dropping the swingarm pivot 4mm for better rear-tire grip. I had spent a couple of days on an 899 Panigale last year at Circuit of The Americas in Texas, so I had a good idea of what to compare the 959 to. It didn’t take me long to realize that the 959 has power all over the 899 regardless-and not only more of it through the rpm range but smoother power, too, with fewer dips and bumps in the powerband. Ducati claims 157 hp, an increase of 9 hp from the 899’s 148 hp at 10,500 rpm, and a torque peak of 79 foot-pounds (a massive 6 foot-pound increase over the 899) at 9,000 rpm. The same Ducati electronics suite of RbW (Ride-by-Wire), DTC (Ducati Traction Control), EBC (Engine Brake Control), DQS (Ducati Quickshift), and Bosch ABS does an excellent job of keeping everything under control. With the DTC set to Level 2 in the Race riding mode, the new 959 Panigale comes off the corners well and continues pulling hard as the rpm rises. I did find, however, that you need to exercise some care in Race mode when opening the throttle midcorner, as the 959’s increased and more responsive torque can come on a little abruptly. If anything, it’s more of an annoyance, really, and it’s very manageable; you just have to be aware of it. The Sport mode throttle response is softer (with the rain-intended Wet mode softer still) and perhaps a little too soft for the track, which is why I left it in Race mode for the majority of my laps. Setting the EBC at Level 1 (the least enginebraking) with the slipper clutch was a big help under braking, allowing the rear end to step out just enough while hammering downshifts to aid but not interfere with corner entry. And speaking of braking, the feel and control provided by the Brembo M4.32 monoblock calipers and 320mm discs were outstanding, allowing trail braking deep into the corner without issues. The fully adjustable Showa 43mm Big Piston Fork offered a very solid feel in all conditions, and while the fully adjustable Sachs rear shock performed admirably, I was wishing for a slightly stiffer spring in the back to counter some squatting under acceleration. Midcorner stability was rock-solid, and although initial turn-in at speed took some effort (a likely by-product of the rear-end squat), overall steering habits were light and agile- the 959’s 430-pound wet weight surely helping matters here. The taller and wider windscreen definitely helps keep the windblast off you down long front straights better than its comparatively skimpy predecessor. And you can move around easily on the bike, aided by the same knurled footpegs found on the 1299 that grip your boots far better than the previously useless pegs found on generations of Ducatis that were only good to rest your feet on when cruising in a straight line. All told, boosting the displacement and adding subtle tweaks to its “Supermid” superquadro engine has yielded great results with the new 959 Panigale. This is the type of bike you can really feel like you’re squeezing all the potential out of, instead of the 1299 Panigale where at times you feel like you’re only along for the ride. Yeah, calling a bike with a 955cc engine a midsize machine is a bit of a stretch, but after a ride on the 959 Panigale, you probably won’t care one bit.
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