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PZInż 7TP

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PZInż 7TP - information: PZInż 7TP is a very good car, that was released by "PZInz" company. We collected the best 11 photos of PZInż 7TP on this page.

Brand Name PZInz
Model PZInż 7TP
Number of views 117526 views
Model's Rate 7.2 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • MAKE MINE A “SUPERMID”.

    Just as it did in 2015 with the 1299 Panigale, Ducati has upped the ante in 2016 with the smaller Panigale, giving the previous 899 the same stroke measurement as the 1299 to create the new 959 Panigale. Ducati wanted to ensure that the “supermid” Panigale kept pace with its bigger brother, so it invited the world’s motorcycling media to the Circuit de la Comunitat Valenciana Ricardo Tormo in Valencia, Spain, to let us find out. Looking at the updates, they are minimal but important, with the engine’s slight increase in stroke from 57.2mm to 60.8mm (resulting in a total displacement of 955cc) necessitating a new crankshaft and connecting rods. The piston crowns are slightly different, while strict Euro 4 noise emissions standards required the fitment of a different exhaust system with dual muffl ers on the right side (thankfully absent from US models), along with ribbing on the cylinder heads and valve covers, and a different cam chain. Exhaust diameter was increased from 55mm to 60mm, while on the intake side, the 62mm oval throttle bodies now feature dual injectors. The clutch now has the slipper/assist function from the 1299 that provides lighter lever action and smoother downshifting when riding aggressively. Meanwhile, thanks to the bike employing the same cast-aluminum monocoque two-piece frame that uses the engine as a structural member, changes on the chassis side are limited to dropping the swingarm pivot 4mm for better rear-tire grip. I had spent a couple of days on an 899 Panigale last year at Circuit of The Americas in Texas, so I had a good idea of what to compare the 959 to. It didn’t take me long to realize that the 959 has power all over the 899 regardless-and not only more of it through the rpm range but smoother power, too, with fewer dips and bumps in the powerband. Ducati claims 157 hp, an increase of 9 hp from the 899’s 148 hp at 10,500 rpm, and a torque peak of 79 foot-pounds (a massive 6 foot-pound increase over the 899) at 9,000 rpm. The same Ducati electronics suite of RbW (Ride-by-Wire), DTC (Ducati Traction Control), EBC (Engine Brake Control), DQS (Ducati Quickshift), and Bosch ABS does an excellent job of keeping everything under control. With the DTC set to Level 2 in the Race riding mode, the new 959 Panigale comes off the corners well and continues pulling hard as the rpm rises. I did find, however, that you need to exercise some care in Race mode when opening the throttle midcorner, as the 959’s increased and more responsive torque can come on a little abruptly. If anything, it’s more of an annoyance, really, and it’s very manageable; you just have to be aware of it. The Sport mode throttle response is softer (with the rain-intended Wet mode softer still) and perhaps a little too soft for the track, which is why I left it in Race mode for the majority of my laps. Setting the EBC at Level 1 (the least enginebraking) with the slipper clutch was a big help under braking, allowing the rear end to step out just enough while hammering downshifts to aid but not interfere with corner entry. And speaking of braking, the feel and control provided by the Brembo M4.32 monoblock calipers and 320mm discs were outstanding, allowing trail braking deep into the corner without issues. The fully adjustable Showa 43mm Big Piston Fork offered a very solid feel in all conditions, and while the fully adjustable Sachs rear shock performed admirably, I was wishing for a slightly stiffer spring in the back to counter some squatting under acceleration. Midcorner stability was rock-solid, and although initial turn-in at speed took some effort (a likely by-product of the rear-end squat), overall steering habits were light and agile- the 959’s 430-pound wet weight surely helping matters here. The taller and wider windscreen definitely helps keep the windblast off you down long front straights better than its comparatively skimpy predecessor. And you can move around easily on the bike, aided by the same knurled footpegs found on the 1299 that grip your boots far better than the previously useless pegs found on generations of Ducatis that were only good to rest your feet on when cruising in a straight line. All told, boosting the displacement and adding subtle tweaks to its “Supermid” superquadro engine has yielded great results with the new 959 Panigale. This is the type of bike you can really feel like you’re squeezing all the potential out of, instead of the 1299 Panigale where at times you feel like you’re only along for the ride. Yeah, calling a bike with a 955cc engine a midsize machine is a bit of a stretch, but after a ride on the 959 Panigale, you probably won’t care one bit.
  • Ducati Scrambler Urban Enduro.

    Ducati India have launched yet another variant of their highly popular (abroad) bike, the Scrambler, called the Scrambler Urban Enduro. This new variant is priced at Rs 7.90 lakh (ex-showroom) and is now on sale. The Urban Enduro comes with a ribbed seat, an enduro-style handlebar, a cool green paint job, fork protectors, a motocrossstyle front fender, headlamp grille and 18-inch front and 17-inch rear wire wheels. These changes have resulted into a bike that looks even more retro than the standard Scrambler.
  • Vauxhall Viva SE 1.0i ecoFLEX.

    It’s been a few months since the baby Viva went on sale, but because there weren’t any 99g/km ecoFLEX editions available to drive at the car’s launch, we have had to wait until now to get our hands on one. Reviving a legendary name from the past, the Viva wears the Opel Karl nameplate in Europe and replaces the boxy Agila at the bottom of the Vauxhall line-up. Just one sub-100g/km edition is offered, and that’s this entry-level SE edition, however, it comes pretty well kitted out for the cash, with big car features like cruise control, Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity and a lane departure warning system. It’s a shame that you’ll need to cough up extra to get DAB digital radio and a space saver spare wheel, though. It’s a cute looking car, with an appearance that’s a whole lot more appealing than its predecessor. Inside, the dashboard is attractively styled, and though it’s awash with hard plastics, Vauxhall’s designers have managed to make the surfaces look good, as well as giving them a sturdy, built-to-last feel. All of the controls are logically arranged high up on the dashboard, and the white on black instruments are easy to read. The driving position is pretty good, despite the steering wheel only being adjustable for rake and not reach, with the seats delivering decent comfort levels. Headroom both front and rear is expansive and surprisingly considering its tiny footprint, there’s more than enough space in the back to carry a couple of passengers, with knee and legroom generous. There’s seatbelts for three back there, but because the Viva is relatively narrow, any middle seat passenger will soon become close friends with the other participants. Boot space is on the small side compared to other city car rivals, not helped by a high sill to haul luggage over, but can be opened up further by tipping the rear seats down almost flat. With most Vivas spending their time in the urban sprawl, there’s sufficient performance to keep up with other traffic. The little 74bhp 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine is quiet and only becomes more raucous when you have your right foot to the floor. The gearbox is smooth and easy to slide in and out of gear, all helped by a light clutch. Surprisingly there’s no stop-start technology fitted to this car - maybe Vauxhall engineers are keeping it up their sleeves for a later, more efficient version. At motorway speeds, the baby Viva is more than capable of cutting it in the outside lane, with decent mid- and upper-range zip, though you’ll want to invest in a set of ear defenders, as there’s more road noise than is ideal, and you’ll hear some wind fluffing from around the front end. Handling is generally neat and tidy, albeit with a modicum of lean when cornering. There’s decent grip, however, and while the steering doesn’t serve up an enormous amount of feel, it’s alright, and better around town than on the open road. Thanks to its compact size, it’s easily manoeuvrable. One of the biggest areas to impress is in ride comfort, with an absorbent suspension that soaks up even the scruffiest of surfaces with great maturity and ease.
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