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PZInż C-7P

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PZInż C-7P - information: PZInż C-7P is a very good car, that was released by "PZInz" company. We collected the best 11 photos of PZInż C-7P on this page.

Brand Name PZInz
Model PZInż C-7P
Number of views 34732 views
Model's Rate 7.1 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • 2016 DUCATIS.

    Ducati has unveiled its updated Hypermotard and Scrambler lines for 2016. The Hypermotard models receive larger engines that are more powerful and meet strict Euro 4 emissions standards, while the Scrambler line expands with the addition of a Flat Track Pro version and the 399cc Sixty2. The company also introduced an updated “Supermid” 959 Panigale, which you can read about elsewhere in this issue. The three models in the Hypermotard lineup-the base Hypermotard, the SP, and the Hyperstrada-receive a larger engine that also meets stringent Euro 4 emissions standards. Bore has been increased from 88mm to 94mm, with a corresponding increase in displacement to 937cc, this despite the models now being referred to as the Hypermotard 939 and Hyperstrada 939. Other updates include an increased compression ratio (from 12.8:1 to 13.1:1) and a redesigned 2-into-1 exhaust system. Maximum power is now 113 hp (slightly up from the previous model’s 110 hp), and torque is up by 10 percent. The Hypermotard’s chassis is unchanged from the previous model, and other features such as the Ducati Safety Pack, three-level ABS, traction control, and riding modes all carry over. In the Scrambler line, the four versions produced last year carry on and are joined by the Flat Track Pro, which is based on the Full Throttle but has side-mounted number plates, a small-nose fairing, and other Ducati accessories such as machined footpegs. As with the Full Throttle, the Flat Track Pro has a Termignoni exhaust as standard. The Sixty2 is a more affordable Scrambler, with a smaller engine derived from the 803cc mill producing 41 hp, which Ducati says will make the bike more accessible for newer riders. The Sixty2 has slightly different brakes and suspension, helping to lower cost to $7,995. The Multistrada 1200 Pikes Peak returns for 2016 after a year off, and the Multistrada line expands further with a more dirt-oriented Enduro model. The Diavel line also grows, with cruiser versions dubbed the XDiavel and XDiavel S added.
  • The science and silence of AMG.

    AMG chairman Tobias Moers has revealed to Wheels that AMG is shifting its focus away from power and on to sharper dynamics for its future models. This means the introduction of high-tech systems such as active aerodynamics, four-wheel steering and even a Drift Mode function as AMG moves into a new battleground in the war for performance car ascendency. AMG has long held a power advantage over its rivals at BMW’s M Division and Audi RS, and Moers says the focus is now on finessing how that prodigious grunt is sent to the road. “It’s not my target to be the most powerful car,” he said. “The target is to be the best driving car. The next step is to be more active, with more active systems like active aero, and to be more active with kinematics.” Moers revealed AMG is well advanced in developing a range of active systems, most of which will debut on the much-hyped road-legal version of the AMG GT3 racing car due later this year. Expected to be badged as the GT R, Moers says the Porsche 911 GT3 rival “will signal the next step for AMG.” It’s also likely to be the first AMG to utilise four-wheel steering. “We discussed active technology earlier, and this will be one of those systems,” Moers told us. “It will help to increase high-speed stability, yaw damping at high speed, and you can increase agility in the car as well. It’s good technology.” The GT R, which is in the final stages of development, takes heavy inspiration from the GT3 racer (pictured) and will include a more aggressive, track-inspired body kit, dominated by a larger rear spoiler and front splitter. Moers hinted this makes the GT R the ideal model to debut active aerodynamic components to improve dynamics. The GT R will also be lighter than the 1570kg AMG GT S, boast wider tracks front and rear, and could produce as much as 415kW from its 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8. Moers wouldn’t be drawn on the GT R’s potential power output, but did say “we have plenty of room to grow [with the 4.0-litre engine].” Currently the 4.0-litre V8 produces 375kW/750Nm in the AMG GT S. Future models will see AMG step even further along the hightech route. Moers revealed he sees a future where AMG models are powered purely by electricity and confirmed his engineers are already developing electric drivetrains that could manifest in a number of different forms. “Electrification makes more sense to me than performance diesels,” he said. “We are looking at everything from plug-in hybrids to pure electric and electric turbos because we are not in position to exclude something from our portfolio. So we’ll do work on several programs at once to find our own path on electrification for the future.” But while Moers sees electrification as inevitable, he’s quick to assure AMG fans that future electric models will retain the brand’s character. “Sound is crucial to AMG, so we will find a solution,” he said. “We found one with the SLS Electric Drive and we know it’s important.” The 552kW SLS AMG Electric Drive, which in 2013 claimed the title as the world’s quickest production electric car with a 0-100km/h sprint of 3.9sec, pumped artificial noise into the cabin during acceleration via its audio system. What’s unlikely to have a long future is AMG’s mighty 12-cylinder engine. Moers confirmed that AMG’s iconic 6.0-litre twin-turbo V12 is under threat due to evertightening emission laws. “We do have V12 aficionados worldwide who want us to keep it, but the V12 segment no longer represents AMG as a brand. There are customers that are very interested in that engine in that exclusive segment, so we are responsible for engineering a V12 and it’s up to us to give the V12 a future. But that’s not decided.” Moers said recent changes to China’s emissions rules have placed the V12’s future in jeopardy. “That’s giving us a big headache with the V12, so it’s a question of how we proceed. That’s what we’re discussing in the company now.”
  • Porsche North America Racing achieve podiums at Daytona.

    Porsche North America Racing started the 2016 WeatherTech United SportsCar Championship with a third place finish in the GTLM class at the 54th Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona. The no.912 Porsche 911 RSR of Earl Bamber, Frйdйric Makowiecki and Michael Christensen battled through an unusually attritional race to take the final step on the podium, although it was nearly so much more for the factory Porsche squad. A wet qualifying session on the Thursday, disrupted by torrential rain, saw the no.911 and no.912 Porsches lock out the front row of the grid in the hands of Nick Tandy and Makowiecki respectively. Such was the GTLM field’s dominance in the wet, the two 911 RSRs actually set the fastest times overall but, thanks to IMSA’s rules, would be forced to start behind the prototype machinery. During the race’s opening hour, Tandy (as is now becoming customary in the USCC) raced into an early lead as the no.912 dropped back into a dogfight with the works Corvettes and BMWs. By the six-hour mark, the two factory Porsches crossed the line onetwo, with the no.911 still narrowly leading. However, through the night - heavily disrupted by multiple full-course caution periods - the momentum swung toward the no. 912 RSR. By dawn, the 54th Rolex 24 had boiled down to a battle between the two Porsches and the no.3 and no.4 Corvette duo. But, with Kйvin Estre at the wheel, the no.911 slowed dramatically on the banking with around five hours to go, a broken driveshaft forcing a lengthy stop for repairs leaving the no.912 to battle on alone. Patrick Pilet would eventually re-emerge in the 2015 championship-winning entry to help it on its way to some useful points in eighth place. After the final round of stops inside the last hour, Bamber found himself once again in the class lead. However, after being hunted down by Oliver Gavin in the no.4 Corvette, the Kiwi racer was nudged out of the lead at the turn five hairpin. With around 20 minutes remaining, the second Chevrolet - in the hands of Antonio Garcia - also found a way through, this time at the Bus Stop chicane, leaving Bamber to watch on as the two Corvettes fought it out for victory. Despite coming close, the two GM cars never came to blows, as Bamber brought the no.912 machine home in third for the crew’s first podium since ViR last August.
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