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Renault 1000 kg Châssis Cabine

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Renault 1000 kg Châssis Cabine - information: Renault 1000 kg Châssis Cabine is a very good car, that was released by "Renault" company. We collected the best 9 photos of Renault 1000 kg Châssis Cabine on this page.

Brand Name Renault
Model Renault 1000 kg Châssis Cabine
Number of views 96689 views
Model's Rate 8.3 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • REAL-LIFE MONSTER.

    The difference in the Ducati engineer’s tone is almost so dramatic that I can’t believe he’s talking about what outwardly appears to be a very similar bike. Last year, I was on hand for the introduction of the Ducati Monster 1200 S, and Ducati’s technical team was using words like “usability,” while going on to say things like, “We want the Monster 1200 to offer greater comfort and accessibility to both rider and passenger.” Today, at the Ascari Race Resort in Malaga, Spain, the same team has done a near complete 180 and is talking about things like added ground clearance for better lean angle and quicker lap times. Such is the goal with Ducati’s new Monster 1200 R… The R utilizes a Testastretta 11° engine similar to that in the 1200 S, only this one uses a thinner head gasket to bump compression ratio up to 13:1 and is paired to larger elliptical throttle bodies with an equivalent diameter of 56mm (versus 53mm on the 1200), plus larger, 58mm-diameter exhaust pipes. Together, these changes bump power output to a claimed 160 hp at 9,250 rpm and torque from 91.8 foot-pounds at 7,250 rpm to 97 foot-pounds at 7,750 rpm. To help the R meet strict Euro 4 emissions standards, Ducati is also using a new material on the piston to reduce leak and has added material to the clutch cover to reduce mechanical noise from the oil pump. Despite the weighty updates, Ducati has actually managed to reduce the claimed curb weight of the R by almost 5 pounds, to 456 pounds, a drop aided by new forged aluminum wheels. For better handling, the 1200 R’s fully adjustable ?hlins suspension has been lengthened (this increases cornering clearance and raises the bike’s center of gravity for lighter handling) as well as re-damped. The effect on geometry is minimal, with the R having just a 2mm-shorter wheelbase (1,509mm versus 1,511mm on the S) and 4.2mm less trail (89mm versus 93.2 on the S). Electronics are the same as they are on the Monster 1200, which is to say the bike has the same three riding modes (Sport, Touring, and Urban) that can be customized via three varying power modes, three-level ABS, and eight-level DTC. All of these settings continue to be adjusted via a switch on the left side of the handlebar and through the Monster’s dash, which now has a gear position indicator. In all situations except for when the sun is directly behind you, all of the bike’s electronic settings are clearly visible. But damn that sun… Additional updates for the R include an ?hlins steering damper, larger 200/55-17 Pirelli Supercorsa SP rear tire (instead of Pirelli Diablo Rosso II rubber), and separate rider/passenger footpeg brackets, the former holding pegs that are machined for better grip and live on an extremely short list of Ducati footpegs that we like (and actually work to keep your feet on the pegs during aggressive riding). Throw a leg over the bike and you’ll notice right away the effects of the new seat and taller suspension, which together bring the seat height from 31.9 inches max on the Monster 1200 S to a nonadjustable 32.7 inches on the 1200 R. While that number doesn’t seem skyscraper high, it’s defi- nitely worth keeping in mind if your parents didn’t grace you with long legs; at 6-foot-3 I could fl at-foot no problem, but my legs were definitely straighter than they would be on similar bikes. The R’s handling makes the bike feel surprisingly at home at the track (and will likely do the same on a twisting canyon road). Even with the larger 200-section rear tire out back, the bike steers into a corner lighter than the standard 1200 and through a transition quicker thanks to the higher center of gravity (and forged wheels, we’re sure). On top of that, when it’s on its side, the re-damped R feels more planted and composed than ever before. I am generally not a huge fan of naked bikes on the track, as the wider handlebar paired to streetsoft suspension typically causes those bikes to move around quite a bit through all parts of the corner, yet with the R there’s relatively none of that unwanted movement, even as the pace picks up. At the other end of a straight, the 1200 R continues to stand out with great braking power from the M50 monoblock calipers and a good feel through the chassis as you bank into the corner; again, not something you get from most street-biased naked bikes. Compare dyno charts between the Monster 1200 R and the 1200 S and you’ll notice that the bikes make about the same power most everywhere below 7,000 rpm. So, similar to the S, the R makes good power off the bottom and can be run in a gear higher than you’d expect in tighter sections of road, the obvious benefit being less shifting over the course of a ride or session at the track. Past 7,000 rpm, the R’s engine starts to pull a bit harder and doesn’t feel like it goes fl at as you close in on the rev limiter. For some, that added liveliness will be the punch to the adrenal glands that the S simply couldn’t give. But there’s more to the engine than a little extra performance up top, as when Ducati engineers mounted the larger throttle bodies they also went through and fine-tuned the parameters for the new Synerject-Continental fuel-injection system. The result is near seamless fueling almost right off the bottom. Whether you’re riding stoplight to stoplight or going to crack the throttle open in the middle of a corner, this has obvious advantages in that it makes the bike less work to ride or stay on top of. And overall, that’s what the Monster 1200 R feels like to me: an easier bike to ride. Sure, it’s a bit faster, but more importantly it’s lighter on its toes and more composed when ridden aggressively. Add in electronic rider aids like traction control and ABS that can be easily tailored to provide as much support as you need (and without being overly intrusive) and you have a bike that’s surprisingly well suited for track riding. Now, there’s something I probably wouldn’t have said about the standard Monster 1200.
  • NORTON FLAT TRACK.

    This modern Norton dirt track custom is the work of Jamie Ireson’s 72Motorcycles, in collaboration with Norton Motorcycles - a tribute to the 1970s RonWood racing machine that won three Ascot track championship titles and was taken to a National dirt track victory by Alex Jorgenson. Based on a newCommando 961, it was recently launched at Motorcycle Live on the official NortonMotorcycles stand as the first of a limited edition run of 12. Ireson said: “The project started whenmy partnerMerryMichau photographed the 2014 Norton brochure. She toldNorton CEO Stuart Garner that I build custombikes and it went from there. Stuart asked us to come up with some ideas and it turned out that we had the same thoughts on building a custombike based on RonWood’s dirt tracker. Ireson is a design engineer by trade and used his experience gained in the automotive industry to model the bike in CAD before committing to metal. “The one thing we needed to do was lower the bike, and working in CAD with models that Norton supplied allowedme to see what effect that had.” That was November 2014 but it took until June 2015 for the project to take off. “Norton sent me a rolling chassis and engine unit with the only stipulation being that the bike had to be ready forMotorcycle Live at the NEC,” says Jamie. The engine and transmission are standard 961, as is the main frame, but Jamie modified the rear end. He says: “The RonWood bike has a really small oil tank, because it’s designed to only do a small number of laps. I cut off the end off the original tank, made up some bends on a CNCmachine and got themwelded up to follow the lines of Ron Wood’s [oil-carrying] frame.” According to Jamie, the standard Norton chassis geometry is slap bang in the middle of what is considered an ideal flat track set-up, but this build had to retain the standard 17in wheels. The swingarm is also standard, but with added bracing. The standard Ohlins forks were too long so Jamie opted for shorter, larger-diameter 58mm Ducati Panigale forks which slot into new yokes made from Jamie’s CAD drawings by Fastec Racing in Suffolk, who also did machining work on footpeg mounts and the velocity stacks. Jamie produced a buck for the tank, from which Parker Fabrication in Bournemouth produced the alloy tank. “The inspiration of the Ron Wood bike was the gorgeous red paintwork and tank graphics. We talked with out painters, Image Design, about giving it a modern twist, but they said it was so good we should leave it. The only change is using the current Norton logo.” The engine is standard, but Jamie’s removed the original airbox, so: “we might pick up anything between five and 10bhp.” The exhaust follows the same lines as the Ron Wood bike. It’s all custom made and hand-rolled by Tom at Foundry Motorcycles. The pipes have been given a super hard-wearing ceramic-coated black by Wes at Hi-Spec Coatings in West Sussex. Lasertech Engineering did all the frame welding. The Norton 961 MM Flat Track is priced at ?30,000. “All 12 will be identical except for the number,” says Jamie. “We’ve got 44. We’re keeping this original bike. Customers can have any number, but we won’t use one number twice.”
  • Audi Q7 e-tron 3.0 TDI quattro.

    You’ve probably already read about Audi’s grand plans for electrification of its model range, and soon it’ll have a second plug-in hybrid model to sell alongside the A3 e-tron launched earlier in the year. This time around the German firm has taken a different route, pairing the 3.0-litre TDI engine from the Q7 with a 126bhp electric motor, which together develop a mighty 369bhp and 516lb ft of torque. Owners will be able to travel up to around 34 miles, depending on the climate, which Audi reckons will be just enough for the daily commute to and from work for the average motorist. Three intelligent driving modes - EV, hybrid and battery hold - can work in tandem with the navigation system for best efficiency thanks to what Audi calls a predictive efficiency assistant. The price tag for all of this technology has yet to be revealed, but is expected to be Ј60k after Government grants, which is a hefty premium over the regular diesel editions. For anyone that’s expecting to see a whole load of electronic trickery, you’ll be disappointed, because the Q7 e-tron looks decidedly like any other diesel Q7, though the instruments have been altered to take into account of the electric motor, including the excellent Virtual Cockpit fitted to our test car. Beautifully finished, soft-touch materials are used throughout the cabin, delivering a high quality ambience. While the driving position is suitably command-like, the height of the dashboard is relatively low and so isn’t quite as imposing as other large SUVs. Supportive seats, a wide range of adjustments to both the chairs and the steering wheel mean that just about anyone can get a comfortable driving position. The cabin is simply huge, and whereas conventionally powered Q7s come with seven-seats as standard, due to the hybrid gubbins, there’s just five here. But that’s just fine as there’s generous space to spread out both front and rear. Boot space is inevitably smaller, but just 120 litre have been lost due to electrification. That still leaves a sizeable 650 litres with the seats up, and an expansive 1,835 litres with the chairs down. Performance is effortless, with smooth, linear acceleration no matter which source of power is being used. While in electric-mode, it’s eerily quiet, with only a distant sound from the tyres to be heard. The engine cuts in almost imperceptibly, with none of the vibrations that rival hybrids were afflicted with. Even with the diesel engine in action, sounds are nicely muted, with the cabin of the Q7 a calm place to travel. There’s a fluid feel to the steering with nice weighting that allows for accurate, precise cornering, and despite its bulk, this e-tron Q7 feels relatively light on its wheels. It handles flatly with little sign of body roll, backed up with huge amounts of grip. The only fly in the ointment is that of brake pedal feel that at times doesn’t inspire total confidence. Ride comfort is impressive, delivering a magic carpet-like ride from its adjustable adaptive suspension.
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