World Encyclopedia of Cars
The best old cars, news and reviews about old cars. Stay in touch!

Robur 30K

All Robur Photos

Robur 30K - information: Robur 30K is a very good car, that was released by "Robur" company. We collected the best 8 photos of Robur 30K on this page.

Brand Name Robur
Model Robur 30K
Number of views 29209 views
Model's Rate 7.5 out of 10
Number of images 8 images
Interesting News
  • F3 AMG.

    The F3 AMG, also shown at the Frankfurt and Tokyo Motor Shows, also made its appearance at EICMA. The concept bike is created in partnership with Mercedes AMG and is inspired by the AMG GT S, which our sister publication Car India recently drove at the Buddh International Circuit. The F3 AMG sports the AMG GT S’ ‘solar beam’ paint scheme, AMG logo on both sides and blacked out wheels.
  • Vauxhall Viva SE 1.0i ecoFLEX.

    It’s been a few months since the baby Viva went on sale, but because there weren’t any 99g/km ecoFLEX editions available to drive at the car’s launch, we have had to wait until now to get our hands on one. Reviving a legendary name from the past, the Viva wears the Opel Karl nameplate in Europe and replaces the boxy Agila at the bottom of the Vauxhall line-up. Just one sub-100g/km edition is offered, and that’s this entry-level SE edition, however, it comes pretty well kitted out for the cash, with big car features like cruise control, Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity and a lane departure warning system. It’s a shame that you’ll need to cough up extra to get DAB digital radio and a space saver spare wheel, though. It’s a cute looking car, with an appearance that’s a whole lot more appealing than its predecessor. Inside, the dashboard is attractively styled, and though it’s awash with hard plastics, Vauxhall’s designers have managed to make the surfaces look good, as well as giving them a sturdy, built-to-last feel. All of the controls are logically arranged high up on the dashboard, and the white on black instruments are easy to read. The driving position is pretty good, despite the steering wheel only being adjustable for rake and not reach, with the seats delivering decent comfort levels. Headroom both front and rear is expansive and surprisingly considering its tiny footprint, there’s more than enough space in the back to carry a couple of passengers, with knee and legroom generous. There’s seatbelts for three back there, but because the Viva is relatively narrow, any middle seat passenger will soon become close friends with the other participants. Boot space is on the small side compared to other city car rivals, not helped by a high sill to haul luggage over, but can be opened up further by tipping the rear seats down almost flat. With most Vivas spending their time in the urban sprawl, there’s sufficient performance to keep up with other traffic. The little 74bhp 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine is quiet and only becomes more raucous when you have your right foot to the floor. The gearbox is smooth and easy to slide in and out of gear, all helped by a light clutch. Surprisingly there’s no stop-start technology fitted to this car - maybe Vauxhall engineers are keeping it up their sleeves for a later, more efficient version. At motorway speeds, the baby Viva is more than capable of cutting it in the outside lane, with decent mid- and upper-range zip, though you’ll want to invest in a set of ear defenders, as there’s more road noise than is ideal, and you’ll hear some wind fluffing from around the front end. Handling is generally neat and tidy, albeit with a modicum of lean when cornering. There’s decent grip, however, and while the steering doesn’t serve up an enormous amount of feel, it’s alright, and better around town than on the open road. Thanks to its compact size, it’s easily manoeuvrable. One of the biggest areas to impress is in ride comfort, with an absorbent suspension that soaks up even the scruffiest of surfaces with great maturity and ease.
  • Bimota invent the techtro….

    Hands up-wedidn’t expect this. But givenBimotahavebased their newretro on theirmost contemporary, exclusive model we don’t think anyone did. TheirwildTesi 3D (Bike, Aug 2015 issue) is an engineeringmasterclass.Hub centre steering and a front swingarm separate suspension, steering and braking forces - so suspension functionswhile braking, bumps don’t affect steering, and so on. It’s amodernvisionof hewnaluminiumand hand-finishedparts. And soBimota think thismakes it perfect for some retroaction. For theRaceCafe the 3D’s angular body is swapped for a traditional profile and tiny seat unitwith the essential brown perch, and there’s the same headlight as onAriel’sAce. The 1078ccDucati V twin is swapped for the803cc Scrambler unit, with a curvy new pipe. Swingarms are un retro carbon. Stare long enough and, fromsome angles, the RaceCafe almost works… but not quite. For us, a Tesi should be all about sharp, cutting edge design. Other Bimotanews ismorepleasing. The newImpeto uses the Diavel’s bulging 1198ccTestastretta engine, anoptional blower taking peak power past 200bhp. Youcan specify a carbon frame, too. Best of all, Bimota are going back to their roots andoffering frame kits. Their BB3 canbe supplied as a rolling chassis to take the motor from a salvaged BMW S1000RR. Just like the good old days. Let’s hope the kit option extends to more models - we’d love to build our own Tesi (no brown seat).
Top Robur models
Popular Searches
World Encyclopedia of Cars
Copyright 2015. All rights under protection.