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Roewe 550

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Roewe 550 - information: Roewe 550 is a very good car, that was released by "Roewe" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Roewe 550 on this page.

Brand Name Roewe
Model Roewe 550
Number of views 78288 views
Model's Rate 8.3 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • CUSHIONING THE RIDE.

    Citroen and Britain go back a long way. Early Citroens were first sold here just after the first World War, from 1919. They quickly endeared themselves to UK drivers, and by 1923 there were already over 23,000 of the cars on British roads. Then, for almost 40 years, from 1926 until 1965, British-made Citroens were produced in a factory in Slough. We Brits are still major consumers of Citroen products, as the third largest market in the world for the cars, behind only China, and Citroen’s native France. There is another very strong Anglo-French link. For the past 18 months, Citroen’s global boss has been a British chief executive, who also happens to be one of the most senior women in the motor industry worldwide. Linda Jackson, former managing director of Citroen UK, runs the company from its Paris base and is shaping its future with some radical plans. Briefly back in Britain on a day trip via Eurostar, she revealed her strategy for driving the company forward and restoring some of its past glory. This is, after all, the brand with some very notable models in its 96-year history, such as the pioneering Traction Avant, the unforgettable 2CV, and the remarkable Ami 6. Citroens used to be known for their quirkiness, a characteristic that had evaporated in a couple of generations of rather bland models, but has recently been revived in the much more characterful Citroen C4 Cactus, with its distinctive body-protecting airbumps. Initial plans to build 70,000 units a year has proved overly modest, and current C4 Cactus production is running at 110,000 per annum. So can we expect more of the same in future models? Yes, says Linda Jackson. Although it is hard to quantify within a largely French-speaking company, as there is no direct translation in French for the word quirky. “The success of the C4 Cactus shows you can have a vehicle that stands out and be successful with it,” comments Linda. “We have never been successful when we try to be like everyone else. It’s a gamble to be quirky, but it’s what we are doing.” Something else for which Citroen has traditionally been known is the magic carpet ride quality of its famed hydropneumatic suspension, although more recently a hydraulic system on the current C5 has sought to deliver a modern version of cushioning ride comfort. But now Citroen is on the brink of revealing a revolutionary new suspension system that Linda says will be exclusive to the French firm, and will eventually become standard right across the range. It will appear on the first new model in 2017. For the moment she is a bit cagey about the specifics, whether it will be a self-levelling design, or some kind of air suspension system, but she promises it will take Citroen back to its roots of admirable ‘floating’ ride comfort, while maintaining good body control for handling precision. “Comfort is a core value of the Citroen brand, and this is our way to recreate the benefits of the hydropneumatic set-up in a more modern, more appropriate way,” she told us. Meanwhile, she is busy with bold plans to slim the Citroen range from its current 14 different body styles to a more rational seven core designs based around three platforms. It’s intended to make the brand both leaner and fitter, and also better structured for customers to appreciate what Citroen is about. So how does a British boss go down in an iconic French company? Pretty well so far. A clear direction and plans to resurrect some of what made past Citroens special is winning her respect. They’re even quite kind about her A-level-based ability to speak French. “They say I have an accent like Jane Birkin,” says an amused Linda.
  • 2016 YAMAHAS.

    New, More Affordable R1S If there is any one downside to the continued evolution of sportbikes it’s cost: The more advanced production motorcycles become, the more expensive they become as well. And while for some that trade-off is justifiable, there are still those consumers who simply aren’t willing to gut their bank account for the exotic materials and technologies that make modern motorcycles the track weapons they are today. For those consumers, Yamaha has introduced its YZF-R1S, which uses cost-effective materials to cut the suggested retail price of the otherwise stellar R1 by $1,500, to “just” $14,990. If your immediate thought is that Yamaha must have taken everything that made the R1 great and thrown it out the door (electronics included), then rest assured that’s not necessarily the case. Instead, with the R1S, Yamaha has gone in and replaced the titanium connecting rods with steel ones and magnesium outer parts and fasteners like the oil pan and right-side engine covers to aluminum ones. Engine cover bolts are now steel instead of aluminum, while wheels are now manufactured from aluminum instead of magnesium and wrapped in Bridgestone Battlax S20 sport tires instead of the R1/R1M’s trackday-intentioned RS10s. The exhaust header piping is also now made from stainless steel rather than titanium. The overall result of all this material swapping is a 9-pound jump in claimed curb weight. The R1/R1M’s MotoGP-inspired electronics package with power modes, traction control, slide control, launch control, and wheelie control goes untouched, though on the R1S, the quickshifter will come as an option rather than as standard equipment. There are a few other changes, including updates to the ECU that are intended to suit the new engine specification. The switch to steel connecting rods from titanium in the R1S means the redline needed to be reduced, the result being slightly less top-end power than the standard R1. Yamaha has yet to quote any numbers, but in published dyno charts (which are devoid of any numbers), it appears that the R1S’s redline is at 12,500 rpm instead of the R1’s 14,000 rpm, with the power loss at the very top around 5 or so horsepower. The R1S is available in either a red/white/ black color scheme or matte gray motif, and the bike is expected to be available beginning in February. New XSR 900 and Updated FJR 1300 The growing “hipster/caf? racer” culture is catching the attention of the OEMs, with Yamaha and its new XSR900 for 2016 being the latest example. The XSR retains the FZ-09’s excellent 847cc crossplane three-cylinder engine and Controlled Filling Die-Cast aluminum frame and swingarm with adjustable KYB suspension but adds styling components and details that harken back to the “heritage, authenticity, and simplicity” of the sporting motorcycles from the ’70s and ’80s. The XSR gets the FZ’s three YCC-T (Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle) riding modes, but it also gets a two-level (plus off) traction control system as well as ABS as standard equipment. An assist/ slipper clutch eases lever effort by a claimed 20 percent while also helping to smooth out downshifts. Everything else mechanically (save for suspension settings) is basically identical to the FZ. Ergonomically, the XSR’s 32.7-inch seat height is 15mm higher than the FZ’s, and the rider’s seating position is moved 50mm rearward to make for a slightly more aggressive riding posture. Styling is the XSR’s main focus. There’s plenty of nice metal bracketry and components where plastic or other materials would normally be used. For example, the nice-looking fuel tank cover on the matte gray/ aluminum version (there’s also one in the 60th Anniversary yellow/black traditional Yamaha motif) is a brushed-aluminum piece that Yamaha says has an actual hand-buffed finish. A single round halogen headlight is held by aluminum brackets, and a round LED taillight mounted atop a metal (aluminum) fender replicate the look of the ’70s caf? racer. The seat features burgundy-colored faux suede leather panels and red stitching. The single round instrument gauge recalls the older style in shape, but in function it jumps to present-day technology with a full LCD info panel. All told, the XSR900 comes in 16 pounds heavier than the FZ-09 according to Yamaha, at a claimed 430 pounds full of fuel. The matte gray/aluminum XSR900 will be available in April, while the 60th Anniversary version will be available slightly later this year in May. Also new for 2016 from Yamaha is the latest FJR1300, in both A (standard) and ES (Electronic Suspension) models. The biggest change for both editions is a six-speed transmission replacing the old five-speed, with a slipper/assist clutch. A new LED headlight and taillight along with slightly revised bodywork complete the revisions for the A model, while the ES gets all that plus a new “lean-angle sensitive” cornering LED light setup that uses three LEDs on each side above the quad-element headlights that light up progressively as the bike leans to more effectively illuminate the road ahead in corners. The 2016 FJR will be available in March; no prices for either the new FJR1300 or XSR900 were available at press time.
  • Exemplary Explorers.

    Triumph have updated their largest adventure bike, and like the Tiger 800 there are now two types: the cast-wheel tarmac-biased Explorer XR, and the spoke-wheel trail-ready Explorer XC. The basic version of each bike is pretty much as before. So that’s a luxurious and syrupy 1215cc ride-by-wire inline three, bolted into a substantial chassis with single-sided swimgarm and shaft drive. Suspension is now supplied by WP, however, and the front brakes are one-piece radial Brembos. There are two riding modes, road and rain, each with their own throttle maps and specific settings for the standard-fit traction control and ABS. The classy dash is also new, switchgear is refined, and the screen now moves at the touch of a button. Yes, it’s electric. That’s a class first, you know. As with the smaller Tigers there are flashier variants too. The Explorer XRx and XCx feature an additional off-road mode with its own settings. Better than that, they also have leanangle sensitive traction control and cornering ABS. That’s right - you can go full gas or grab the lever mid-corner, and a little black box squares the job up. The XRx and XCx also benefit from WP’s semi-active suspension, with preset ride options, continually-tweaked damping and rear preload that sets itself automatically. Heated grips, too. There’s more. Go for the touring-biased XRT or round-the-globe XCA, and the revised Explorer also gets a sportmode, a rider configurablemode, hill start control, heated seats and a taller screen. In terms of high-tech-spec, this puts the big Brit right up there with the KTM 1290 Super Adventure and a BMW R1200GSwithall the factory-fit options.
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