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Roth Outlaw

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Roth Outlaw - information: Roth Outlaw is a very good car, that was released by "Roth" company. We collected the best 11 photos of Roth Outlaw on this page.

Brand Name Roth
Model Roth Outlaw
Number of views 85594 views
Model's Rate 5.5 out of 10
Number of images 11 images
Interesting News
  • SIX HITTERS.

    These two Benelli sixes were part of a sensational stand by a coalition of three clubs for six-cylinder bikes from Honda, Kawasaki and Benelli. The yellow caf? racer was built by Jean Louis Gayot with help from friend Enrique Martinez. Jean Louis runs a small bike shop called Paris Moto Classique and said: “My desire was to have a caf? racer with silencers that were politically correct, but with a nice sound. I want to ride it on the road and see the reaction of people. I thought I was going to be stopped by a policeman on the roadside one time, but he waved at me and gave me the thumbs up. Another time I rode to Castellet [Paul Ricard circuit] and Agostini told me my bike was ‘ very efficient but also very musical’.” Gayot’s Sei has high-lift cams, six Dell’Orto carbs instead of the stock three, Fontana front brake and box-section swingarm. The special exhaust and tank/ seat bodywork were all sourced from Italy. The green road racer, called Garuda (a large predatory bird in Buddhist mythology) is owned by Bernard Moudurier, president of the Benelli Six Owners Club in France and founder of the Benelli Racing Team. Jean Louis said: “Bernard wanted to prove that the Sei could be a competitive road racing machine, unlike Benelli’s illfated Bol d’Or bike in 1976. He’s a guy who likes to prove nothing is impossible!” The bike finished 14th overall at Magny Cours in a classic endurance race, running second in the wet.
  • Ford B-MAX Tita nium 1.5 TDCi.

    While Ford has been busy replacing most of its MPV range, with all-new S-MAX and Galaxy models, as well a substantial facelift to the C-MAX, the baby B-MAX has soldiered on. It’s the only model, apart from the Ka, not to have adopted Ford’s wide mouthed, Aston Martinesque grille, though it only has to be a matter of time before a facelifted version arrives. In the meantime, Ford has replaced its 1.6-litre TDCi engine with a downsized, identically powered 1.5-litre unit that manages to be 3.7mpg more economical, with CO2 emissions that are 6g/km less and with an acceleration to 62mph time that is just under a second faster. And the price for all of these improvements, a modest Ј130. At its launch, the B-MAX won plaudits for its interesting sliding rear doors that leave a pillarless space when both front and rear doors are open. It makes loading little’uns into the child seats in the back a breeze, especially in tightly proportioned car parks. That combined with generous head and legroom both front and rear, this is one seriously spacious car, despite its modest footprint. The dashboard is attractively styled with all of the controls logically arranged, though we think it’s a shame that there are so many tiny buttons on the audio system. The optional navigation system is hindered by a small screen, albeit with excellent colourful graphics, we just wish there was more of it. Still, it’s neatly positioned just within your eye line. The dashboard materials are made out of decent plastics and feel well appointed, though it’s a disappointment that the door tops are made out of hard materials. The driving position is best described as command, with a good view out along the bonnet. In fact, all round vision is pretty good, thanks to deep windows, except for the super wide central door pillars. Boot space is smaller than most of its immediate rivals, but thanks to a low sill and wide opening, you can make good use of the available room. There’s extra underfloor storage and the seats fold down totally flat. With just 94bhp on tap, you’re not likely to win any traffic light Grand Prix, and it’s surprising that Ford doesn’t offer the more powerful 118bhp edition of this engine for extra zip. It’s a quiet unit, though, and is only really noticeable at higher revs, though at motorway speeds it’s barely audible. Besides, the sound is drowned out by the excessive road noise and fluttering of the wind around the windscreen. As you would expect from a Blue Oval-badged car, it’s the driving experience that really excels, with communicative, agile steering and while there’s some lean when cornering, on account of its tall sides, everything is kept well in check, with generous amounts of grip. But it’s the ride comfort that is at odds with the high degree of comfort that the B-MAX otherwise delivers, with a firm edge to the suspension that results in too many of the road imperfections being transmitted into the cabin. The slick, smooth five-speed manual gearbox is a delight to use and has a light clutch as a companion. Gear ratios are well thought out, allowing you to make reasonable progress even considering the modest power and size of the engine.
  • Vauxhall Viva SE 1.0i ecoFLEX.

    It’s been a few months since the baby Viva went on sale, but because there weren’t any 99g/km ecoFLEX editions available to drive at the car’s launch, we have had to wait until now to get our hands on one. Reviving a legendary name from the past, the Viva wears the Opel Karl nameplate in Europe and replaces the boxy Agila at the bottom of the Vauxhall line-up. Just one sub-100g/km edition is offered, and that’s this entry-level SE edition, however, it comes pretty well kitted out for the cash, with big car features like cruise control, Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity and a lane departure warning system. It’s a shame that you’ll need to cough up extra to get DAB digital radio and a space saver spare wheel, though. It’s a cute looking car, with an appearance that’s a whole lot more appealing than its predecessor. Inside, the dashboard is attractively styled, and though it’s awash with hard plastics, Vauxhall’s designers have managed to make the surfaces look good, as well as giving them a sturdy, built-to-last feel. All of the controls are logically arranged high up on the dashboard, and the white on black instruments are easy to read. The driving position is pretty good, despite the steering wheel only being adjustable for rake and not reach, with the seats delivering decent comfort levels. Headroom both front and rear is expansive and surprisingly considering its tiny footprint, there’s more than enough space in the back to carry a couple of passengers, with knee and legroom generous. There’s seatbelts for three back there, but because the Viva is relatively narrow, any middle seat passenger will soon become close friends with the other participants. Boot space is on the small side compared to other city car rivals, not helped by a high sill to haul luggage over, but can be opened up further by tipping the rear seats down almost flat. With most Vivas spending their time in the urban sprawl, there’s sufficient performance to keep up with other traffic. The little 74bhp 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine is quiet and only becomes more raucous when you have your right foot to the floor. The gearbox is smooth and easy to slide in and out of gear, all helped by a light clutch. Surprisingly there’s no stop-start technology fitted to this car - maybe Vauxhall engineers are keeping it up their sleeves for a later, more efficient version. At motorway speeds, the baby Viva is more than capable of cutting it in the outside lane, with decent mid- and upper-range zip, though you’ll want to invest in a set of ear defenders, as there’s more road noise than is ideal, and you’ll hear some wind fluffing from around the front end. Handling is generally neat and tidy, albeit with a modicum of lean when cornering. There’s decent grip, however, and while the steering doesn’t serve up an enormous amount of feel, it’s alright, and better around town than on the open road. Thanks to its compact size, it’s easily manoeuvrable. One of the biggest areas to impress is in ride comfort, with an absorbent suspension that soaks up even the scruffiest of surfaces with great maturity and ease.
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