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Sanglas 400 F

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Sanglas 400 F - information: Sanglas 400 F is a very good car, that was released by "Sanglas" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Sanglas 400 F on this page.

Brand Name Sanglas
Model Sanglas 400 F
Number of views 80642 views
Model's Rate 6.4 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • TOYOTA LAND CRUISER INVINCIBLE 2.8 D-4D AUTOMATIC.

    When you’ve got a vehicle in your lineup as legendary as the Land Cruiser, the key to success is continuous evolution. Small improvements dotted throughout the model’s life will ensure that you have something new for customers that change their car regularly. This approach, Toyota has got down to a fine art, with the latest car benefiting from a brand new 174bhp 2.8-litre D-4D engine and six-speed automatic transmission that meets the latest Euro-6 emissions regulations. Fuel economy and CO2 emissions are both improved - up by 3.3mpg and down by 19g/km, respectively - but power and torque figures are disappointingly less than before. But despite the power cut, the on-road driving experience is enhanced compared to before. Performance is adequate, and while the engine is chattery from cold, it settles down a fair bit when warmed through. You’ll still hear it, especially when you floor the throttle, but at motorway speeds it settles down to a low roar, while road and wind noise are kept reasonably well in check. There’s a vagueness to the steering, however, cornering prowess is pretty good, with low levels of lean through bends, and generous amounts of grip. A choice of ‘comfort’ or ‘sport’ modes for the suspension means that things get too bouncy and wallowy in the former setting, but nicely firmed up in the latter, with all but the deepest of potholes and severest of undulations soaked up well, making the Sport mode the setting of choice for us. Off road, show the Land Cruiser a muddy field or a heavily rutted track and it’ll eat it up and spit it out - its mug plugging prowess far exceeds its ability on the road. The interior of the Land Cruiser has been steadily improved over time, with better and better materials used along the way. The majority of the plastics are of the soft-touch variety and all of the fixtures and fittings feel like they’ve been screwed together nicely and will stand up to a lifetime’s worth of abuse. The wood trim seems outdated to us, while the steering wheel would be better if it was covered entirely in leather, rather than having the slippery feel of the wood. Controls for the four-wheel-drive system dominate the centre console, with all of the buttons logically arranged up high on the dashboard. The navigation screen is ideally placed and easy to use, with clear and colourful graphics. Visibility is generally good all around the car thanks to its square shape and good sized windows, though the rear wiper is next to useless due to the small area that it wipes. Park it in tight spaces and you’ll curse the side opening tailgate, and wish that it had a more conventional up and over arrangement. The space available is also smaller than most rivals, despite the vehicle’s obvious bulk. Oddment space is well catered for thanks to a large cubby hole underneath the armrest, decently sized door pockets and glovebox, and a pair of cupholders. Even with a sunroof fitted, headroom is pretty good both front and rear, and back seat passengers will be impressed by the amount of knee room. The usual caveats apply when it comes to using the sixth and seventh seat in the back, with passengers likely to want the journey to be as short as possible, unless they’re a youngster.
  • Skoda Superb SE L Executive 2.0 TDI Automatic.

    Earlier in the year, the latest Superb Estate faced one of its deadliest rivals in the large car arena, challenging Ford’s Mondeo in an estate car showdown. It beat its Blue Oval rival thanks to its spacious cabin and huge boot. Now, months later, we’ve got behind the wheel of the hatchback edition, paired to the more powerful 188bhp edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine and six-speed twin-clutch DSG automatic transmission. Here we test it in upmarket SE L Executive trim, which delivers a lengthy list of standard equipment for the Ј28,720 asking price. This more powerful edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine serves up effortless performance, but rarely feels as fast as the on paper figures suggest it should. Maybe it’s because the super refined drivetrain filters out all of the sensations of speed, instead delivering a relatively serene driving experience. The six-speed twin-clutch transmission certainly swaps cogs efficiently enough, with little evidence that the gears have been changed. The engine may sound a little clattery from cold, but soon settles down to become a distant backing track, and you’re more likely to be troubled with the road and tyre noise that permeates all too readily into the cabin. Through corners, the handling is neat and tidy, with low levels of body lean and a generous amount of grip. The steering is accurate and nicely weighted, however it isn’t as much fun to pilot as a Ford Mondeo, for example. Ride comfort is a mixed bag, and at faster motorway speeds it soaks up imperfections with ease. At lower speeds the suspension can become fidgety, transferring too many potholes and thumps into the cabin. The cabin of the Superb is a masterclass in elegant design. Swathes of soft-touch plastics are mixed with smart looking metal appliquйs, with all of the major controls exactly where you expect them. The eight-inch touchscreen navigation system is perfectly positioned and a delight to use, thanks to clearly labelled buttons alongside. The instruments are a model of clarity thanks to a white on black design, however, it’s a shame that the markings are out of tune for the UK market, showing speeds of 20, 40 and 60, when 30, 50 and 70 would be more relevant. The driving position is multi-adjustable, while the no-cost option of leather and Alcantara seats hug you nicely in place when cornering. Generous head and legroom both front and rear give the sense that you’re travelling in a vehicle altogether more upmarket, and limousinelike in flavour. Family life inevitably means lots of clutter and there’s plenty of space for oddments thanks to a large lidded tray ahead of the gear lever, a well-proportioned glovebox and door pockets, as well as an area beneath the armrest. Rearward vision is a little compromised due to a shallow rear screen, but thankfully rear parking sensors are provided on all but the entry-level model. One piece of handy buying advice is to make sure that you tick the box for the no-cost rear wiper, as the default option is that it comes without. It’s at the business end where the Superb plays its biggest trump card, with a boot capacity of 625 litres that is larger than any other similarly sized car on the road.
  • 2016 YAMAHAS.

    New, More Affordable R1S If there is any one downside to the continued evolution of sportbikes it’s cost: The more advanced production motorcycles become, the more expensive they become as well. And while for some that trade-off is justifiable, there are still those consumers who simply aren’t willing to gut their bank account for the exotic materials and technologies that make modern motorcycles the track weapons they are today. For those consumers, Yamaha has introduced its YZF-R1S, which uses cost-effective materials to cut the suggested retail price of the otherwise stellar R1 by $1,500, to “just” $14,990. If your immediate thought is that Yamaha must have taken everything that made the R1 great and thrown it out the door (electronics included), then rest assured that’s not necessarily the case. Instead, with the R1S, Yamaha has gone in and replaced the titanium connecting rods with steel ones and magnesium outer parts and fasteners like the oil pan and right-side engine covers to aluminum ones. Engine cover bolts are now steel instead of aluminum, while wheels are now manufactured from aluminum instead of magnesium and wrapped in Bridgestone Battlax S20 sport tires instead of the R1/R1M’s trackday-intentioned RS10s. The exhaust header piping is also now made from stainless steel rather than titanium. The overall result of all this material swapping is a 9-pound jump in claimed curb weight. The R1/R1M’s MotoGP-inspired electronics package with power modes, traction control, slide control, launch control, and wheelie control goes untouched, though on the R1S, the quickshifter will come as an option rather than as standard equipment. There are a few other changes, including updates to the ECU that are intended to suit the new engine specification. The switch to steel connecting rods from titanium in the R1S means the redline needed to be reduced, the result being slightly less top-end power than the standard R1. Yamaha has yet to quote any numbers, but in published dyno charts (which are devoid of any numbers), it appears that the R1S’s redline is at 12,500 rpm instead of the R1’s 14,000 rpm, with the power loss at the very top around 5 or so horsepower. The R1S is available in either a red/white/ black color scheme or matte gray motif, and the bike is expected to be available beginning in February. New XSR 900 and Updated FJR 1300 The growing “hipster/caf? racer” culture is catching the attention of the OEMs, with Yamaha and its new XSR900 for 2016 being the latest example. The XSR retains the FZ-09’s excellent 847cc crossplane three-cylinder engine and Controlled Filling Die-Cast aluminum frame and swingarm with adjustable KYB suspension but adds styling components and details that harken back to the “heritage, authenticity, and simplicity” of the sporting motorcycles from the ’70s and ’80s. The XSR gets the FZ’s three YCC-T (Yamaha Chip Controlled Throttle) riding modes, but it also gets a two-level (plus off) traction control system as well as ABS as standard equipment. An assist/ slipper clutch eases lever effort by a claimed 20 percent while also helping to smooth out downshifts. Everything else mechanically (save for suspension settings) is basically identical to the FZ. Ergonomically, the XSR’s 32.7-inch seat height is 15mm higher than the FZ’s, and the rider’s seating position is moved 50mm rearward to make for a slightly more aggressive riding posture. Styling is the XSR’s main focus. There’s plenty of nice metal bracketry and components where plastic or other materials would normally be used. For example, the nice-looking fuel tank cover on the matte gray/ aluminum version (there’s also one in the 60th Anniversary yellow/black traditional Yamaha motif) is a brushed-aluminum piece that Yamaha says has an actual hand-buffed finish. A single round halogen headlight is held by aluminum brackets, and a round LED taillight mounted atop a metal (aluminum) fender replicate the look of the ’70s caf? racer. The seat features burgundy-colored faux suede leather panels and red stitching. The single round instrument gauge recalls the older style in shape, but in function it jumps to present-day technology with a full LCD info panel. All told, the XSR900 comes in 16 pounds heavier than the FZ-09 according to Yamaha, at a claimed 430 pounds full of fuel. The matte gray/aluminum XSR900 will be available in April, while the 60th Anniversary version will be available slightly later this year in May. Also new for 2016 from Yamaha is the latest FJR1300, in both A (standard) and ES (Electronic Suspension) models. The biggest change for both editions is a six-speed transmission replacing the old five-speed, with a slipper/assist clutch. A new LED headlight and taillight along with slightly revised bodywork complete the revisions for the A model, while the ES gets all that plus a new “lean-angle sensitive” cornering LED light setup that uses three LEDs on each side above the quad-element headlights that light up progressively as the bike leans to more effectively illuminate the road ahead in corners. The 2016 FJR will be available in March; no prices for either the new FJR1300 or XSR900 were available at press time.
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