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Shanghai-Volkswagen Santana 3000

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Shanghai-Volkswagen Santana 3000 - information: Shanghai-Volkswagen Santana 3000 is a very good car, that was released by "Shanghai-Volkswagen" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Shanghai-Volkswagen Santana 3000 on this page.

Brand Name Shanghai-Volkswagen
Model Shanghai-Volkswagen Santana 3000
Number of views 106925 views
Model's Rate 6.2 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • RENAULT.

    A new special edition version of the Twingo has been unveiled by Renault called the Iconic. It’s available with both the 1.0 SCe 70 petrol engine and 0.9 TCe 90 powerplant, with both versions falling below the magic 100g/km CO2 barrier. Priced at Ј11,845 for the former and Ј12,545 for the latter, the Twingo Iconic is based on the Dynamique model, and features cruise control, electric front windows, front fog lights, electric and heated mirrors, DAB digital radio, rear privacy glass, gloss black door mirrors and a navigation system that operates via your smartphone. Moving to the cabin, there’s black part leather upholstery with white and violet piping, climate control, automatic headlights and wipers, as well as door sill plates and floor mats. Two unique colours are offered - Ultraviolet and Lunar Grey - as well as black and white. Along the side of the Twingo Iconic there’s Ultraviolet side decals and a similarly coloured emblem on the centre caps of the 16-inch alloy wheels. Black alloy wheels are offered as a no-cost optional extra. The new Twingo Iconic is available to order now from Renault dealers.
  • Mitsubishi Shogun 3.2 DI-D SG4 LWB Automatic.

    With the launch of the 2016 model year Shoguns, the model range has been slimmed down, with the manual gearbox variants axed. A new Euro-6 compliant engine arrives, but it’s disappointing to note that it is thirstier, emits more CO2 and produces less power. Fuel economy on the combined cycle is now 30.4mpg (previously 33.2mpg), CO2 emissions rise by 21 to a hefty 245g/km, while maximum power drops by 9bhp to 188bhp. Thankfully acceleration to 62mph is preserved, even if the top speed is reduced by one mph. The loss in performance is blamed on the changes necessary to get the Shogun to pass the more stringent Euro-6 emissions regulations. What hasn’t changed is its no-nonsense go-anywhere ability and class-leading 3,500kg towing weight. The cabin of the Shogun feels solid, and even employs a smattering of soft-touch plastics, but doesn’t feel plush, mainly down to outdated switchgear and buttons. The two-tone grey and beige trim looks good, but the wood trim gives a dated ambience. The driving position is upright, with seats that are comfortable, even if they lack sufficient rearward travel for taller and bulkier drivers, while the steering wheel only adjusts for rake and not reach. Thanks to enormous mirrors and deep windows, all round vision from the driver’s seat is excellent, handy when manoeuvring in tight spots or negotiating tough terrain when off-road. Headroom is generous front and back, even with the sunroof fitted, and legroom in the middle row is sufficient for even the tallest of passengers. Those wanting to use the rearmost chairs will need to be nimble, as in common with most seven-seat SUVs, you’ll need to do a fair bit of climbing. For carrying capacity, the Shogun is best in five-seat mode, where there’s a large, wide and deep area, with a relatively low loading sill. The side opening rear door is a pain in confined spaces, however. Oddment space is generally good, with a deep storage area under the armrest and a generously sized glovebox. Start the Shogun from cold and first impressions aren’t good. It takes an age for the engine to fire into life, and when it does there’s plenty of clatter. Moving away from rest there’s decent pace, albeit in a noisy fashion, and the sound never really disappears, even at motorway speeds. Most newer rivals employ smoother six-cylinder units to combat noise and deliver a smoother demeanour. But even if the engine was quieter, you’re still left with plenty of road and wind noise. Heavy, slow to react steering is a chore in car parks, but is alright at higher speeds. The tall sides of the Shogun inevitably mean some body lean when cornering, however, with excellent grip there’s rarely any drama. The suspension has clearly been setup for comfort rather than outright agility, soaking up all but the deepest of potholes and ruts nicely. So the Shogun is lagging behind the class best for on-road ability, but thanks to its selectable four-wheel-drive system, there isn’t another vehicle at this price point, with the same long list of equipment, that can touch it off-road in the rough stuff, and also in its.
  • Jaguar XJ.

    It’s fair to say that the new Jaguar XE and XF have been soaking up most of the coverage about Jaguar of late, not to mention the upcoming F-Pace, set to arrive in showrooms next year. And then there’s been the Bond connection, with 007 behind the wheel of the stunning C-X75 supercar, which though once mooted for production, won’t now be built. With so much going on, it’s little surprise that the announcement of a revised XJ fell below the radar, with the first examples arriving in showrooms just about now. It’s remarkable to think that the F-Type is now Jaguar’s oldest car in its line-up, having only been launched in 2012, and arriving in showrooms during 2013. It’s a far cry from Jaguar’s line-up just a few years ago when most of the models seemed quite elderly. It’s been the hefty cash injection from Jaguar’s owners, Tata Motors, that has made the difference, ever since it bought the firm alongside Land Rover back in 2008. In excess of Ј11 billion has been invested over the past seven years, which has resulted in the transformation that we see today. And while Jaguar’s sales performance hasn’t quite lived up to the spectacular results that the Land Rover range has seen, last month’s increase in sales of 93 per cent compared to a year ago is predicted to be just the start. Much of Jaguar’s hopes are being pinned on the upcoming F-Pace crossover vehicle, though this updated XJ is set to make a small, but significant contribution thanks to important gains in the chauffeur market. Jaguar executives have been wooing big names in the professional end of the market, and it’ll mean that you’ll see more long- wheelbase XJs on the outside of the motorway instead of the Mercedes-Benz S-Class. The headline change in the latest XJ, apart from some modest styling changes, is the introduction of a new Euro-6 compliant 3.0- litre V6 diesel engine that develops 296bhp and a mighty 516lb ft of torque. That’s a rather useful 25bhp up on the outgoing model, not to mention the 73lb ft of torque. And yet, both CO2 emissions and fuel economy figures are improved over the previous edition, with this standard wheelbase R-Sport edition emitting 155g/km of CO2 and capable of 47.9mpg on the combined cycle. Less sporty editions manage 149g/km and 49.6mpg, an enhancement compared to the 159g/km and 46.3mpg possible on the earlier model. And this time around there’s no penalty for choosing the long-wheelbase edition, with fuel economy and CO2 emissions remaining the same. But with the vital statistics out of the way, it’s time to talk about some of the changes made to the car. New full-LED lights give the latest XJ a more distinctive quad-lighting signature at night, while a prominent, upright front grille gives a much more muscular, imposing stance. At the rear, LED technology is used to great effect to deliver a J-shape signature for the tail lights, flanked by revised bumpers, a gloss black valence and a chrome insert. A totally new, superfast infotainment system totally transforms the connectivity of the latest XJ, finally putting to rest the limitations and clunkiness of the old audio and navigation system. And finally, the model range has been revised to add a dynamic R-Sport edition, as tested here, as well as a flagship Autobiography model paired to the long-wheelbase body that elevates the XJ range past the Ј80k barrier. The cabin of the latest XJ is as special as ever. The materials are sumptuous, swathed in leather, and the wrap-around effect of the dashboard delivers a cosy, encapsulating feel. Piano black surfaces deliver a modern, sporty look, while the heavily bolstered chairs hold you in place nicely along demanding stretches of road. The air vents wouldn’t be out of place in a Rolls-Royce, giving the impression that nothing has been spared in the search for ultimate luxury. Generous adjustment to the front chairs means that you can get a really comfortable driving position, though the front seats don’t go low enough to stop the heads of taller drivers from brushing the headlining when the optional sunroof is fitted. Move to the back, and there’s a generous amount of knee and leg space and rear passengers don’t seem to suffer from headroom limitations like those in the front do. The sizeable transmission tunnel running through the centre of the car means that the XJ is best suited to two passengers sat in the back. In common with the XF, there’s theatrics in store when the car is started up, with the rotary gear selector rising up from the centre console. It’s a feature that you never tire of and adds to the special feel that every XJ delivers. Accelerate off the line and the latest 296bhp 3.0-litre V6 diesel engine catapults you along the road faster than its predecessor. It may only be 0.2 of a second faster to 62mph, but responsiveness is improved nonetheless, no doubt helped by the extra torque on tap. It’s impressively refined at all speeds, yet delivers a pleasing growl when you bury the accelerator pedal into the bulkhead. Despite being more than five metres long, agility through tricky corners is impressive, with excellent grip and reassuringly flat handling. The steering has a pleasing weight to it, and is highly satisfying when being piloted through a challenging set of bends. It’s really good fun for such a big car, yet is utterly manoeuvrable in a city setting. The suspension of this R-Sport model errs on the firm side, no doubt, and will appeal to owners that prefer a more dynamic driving experience. A short drive of the Autobiography model rounded off the sharper edges nicely, delivering a smoother ride at all road speeds.
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