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SISU Hustler

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SISU Hustler - information: SISU Hustler is a very good car, that was released by "SISU" company. We collected the best 12 photos of SISU Hustler on this page.

Brand Name SISU
Model SISU Hustler
Number of views 37603 views
Model's Rate 7.1 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • Jaguar XJ.

    It’s fair to say that the new Jaguar XE and XF have been soaking up most of the coverage about Jaguar of late, not to mention the upcoming F-Pace, set to arrive in showrooms next year. And then there’s been the Bond connection, with 007 behind the wheel of the stunning C-X75 supercar, which though once mooted for production, won’t now be built. With so much going on, it’s little surprise that the announcement of a revised XJ fell below the radar, with the first examples arriving in showrooms just about now. It’s remarkable to think that the F-Type is now Jaguar’s oldest car in its line-up, having only been launched in 2012, and arriving in showrooms during 2013. It’s a far cry from Jaguar’s line-up just a few years ago when most of the models seemed quite elderly. It’s been the hefty cash injection from Jaguar’s owners, Tata Motors, that has made the difference, ever since it bought the firm alongside Land Rover back in 2008. In excess of Ј11 billion has been invested over the past seven years, which has resulted in the transformation that we see today. And while Jaguar’s sales performance hasn’t quite lived up to the spectacular results that the Land Rover range has seen, last month’s increase in sales of 93 per cent compared to a year ago is predicted to be just the start. Much of Jaguar’s hopes are being pinned on the upcoming F-Pace crossover vehicle, though this updated XJ is set to make a small, but significant contribution thanks to important gains in the chauffeur market. Jaguar executives have been wooing big names in the professional end of the market, and it’ll mean that you’ll see more long- wheelbase XJs on the outside of the motorway instead of the Mercedes-Benz S-Class. The headline change in the latest XJ, apart from some modest styling changes, is the introduction of a new Euro-6 compliant 3.0- litre V6 diesel engine that develops 296bhp and a mighty 516lb ft of torque. That’s a rather useful 25bhp up on the outgoing model, not to mention the 73lb ft of torque. And yet, both CO2 emissions and fuel economy figures are improved over the previous edition, with this standard wheelbase R-Sport edition emitting 155g/km of CO2 and capable of 47.9mpg on the combined cycle. Less sporty editions manage 149g/km and 49.6mpg, an enhancement compared to the 159g/km and 46.3mpg possible on the earlier model. And this time around there’s no penalty for choosing the long-wheelbase edition, with fuel economy and CO2 emissions remaining the same. But with the vital statistics out of the way, it’s time to talk about some of the changes made to the car. New full-LED lights give the latest XJ a more distinctive quad-lighting signature at night, while a prominent, upright front grille gives a much more muscular, imposing stance. At the rear, LED technology is used to great effect to deliver a J-shape signature for the tail lights, flanked by revised bumpers, a gloss black valence and a chrome insert. A totally new, superfast infotainment system totally transforms the connectivity of the latest XJ, finally putting to rest the limitations and clunkiness of the old audio and navigation system. And finally, the model range has been revised to add a dynamic R-Sport edition, as tested here, as well as a flagship Autobiography model paired to the long-wheelbase body that elevates the XJ range past the Ј80k barrier. The cabin of the latest XJ is as special as ever. The materials are sumptuous, swathed in leather, and the wrap-around effect of the dashboard delivers a cosy, encapsulating feel. Piano black surfaces deliver a modern, sporty look, while the heavily bolstered chairs hold you in place nicely along demanding stretches of road. The air vents wouldn’t be out of place in a Rolls-Royce, giving the impression that nothing has been spared in the search for ultimate luxury. Generous adjustment to the front chairs means that you can get a really comfortable driving position, though the front seats don’t go low enough to stop the heads of taller drivers from brushing the headlining when the optional sunroof is fitted. Move to the back, and there’s a generous amount of knee and leg space and rear passengers don’t seem to suffer from headroom limitations like those in the front do. The sizeable transmission tunnel running through the centre of the car means that the XJ is best suited to two passengers sat in the back. In common with the XF, there’s theatrics in store when the car is started up, with the rotary gear selector rising up from the centre console. It’s a feature that you never tire of and adds to the special feel that every XJ delivers. Accelerate off the line and the latest 296bhp 3.0-litre V6 diesel engine catapults you along the road faster than its predecessor. It may only be 0.2 of a second faster to 62mph, but responsiveness is improved nonetheless, no doubt helped by the extra torque on tap. It’s impressively refined at all speeds, yet delivers a pleasing growl when you bury the accelerator pedal into the bulkhead. Despite being more than five metres long, agility through tricky corners is impressive, with excellent grip and reassuringly flat handling. The steering has a pleasing weight to it, and is highly satisfying when being piloted through a challenging set of bends. It’s really good fun for such a big car, yet is utterly manoeuvrable in a city setting. The suspension of this R-Sport model errs on the firm side, no doubt, and will appeal to owners that prefer a more dynamic driving experience. A short drive of the Autobiography model rounded off the sharper edges nicely, delivering a smoother ride at all road speeds.
  • Renault Megane.

    The Renault Megane used to be the second best-selling family hatchback in Europe, behind only the all-conquering Volkswagen Golf, but that was ten years ago and things haven’t gone awfully well for the car since then. The latest model has a lot of work to do. Rather than rehashing the existing model, Renault has splashed the cash to create an all-new Megane, although it does share some of its underpinnings with the new Espace and Talisman - both cars we won’t be getting here in the UK. The styling is unlike anything we’ve seen from Renault before, with dramatic light signatures front and rear, while a Renault diamond the size of a dinner plate adorns the grille to remind everybody what it is that you’re driving. It’s the widest car in its class, but retains at least some traditional French design flair to mask the bulk. It’s all very different from the me-too euro-hatchbacks from some other manufacturers. The interior has had similar levels of effort put in, the highlight being an 8.7-inch tablet-like touchscreen mounted centrally, that operates most functions of the car. There’s pleasant chrome surrounds to many parts, and the instrument binnacle houses a hi-tech screen that allows you to choose your own speedometer style. It doesn’t quite gel together though. The surround for the touchscreen feels cheap, and the screen itself is often slow to respond, even to multiple jabs to kick it in to action. It’s also likely to be a cost-option on all but the highest specification, the rest making do with a smaller horizontal screen. The rest of the cabin is pleasant enough, with adjustable ambient lighting adding a touch of class to proceedings. Large door bins take a good-sized bottle, and there’s a bigger boot than you’ll find in the Golf, Astra or Focus. Some minor issues could probably be forgiven on this early model though - the UK won’t be getting Megane until the middle of the year, so there’s plenty of time to tackle any snags. What won’t need fixing is the drive. The trusty 1.6-litre diesel engine found across the Renault range makes another appearance here, but it’s a reasonably refined unit that provides linear power delivery and excellent economy. Performance is acceptable too, with the 0-62mph dash taking exactly ten seconds, while in-gear acceleration is strong thanks to 236ft lb of torque. Ride quality is as good as you expect from a French car, without sacrificing any handling prowess. It’s not engaging like a Focus, but it’s got plenty of grip, is utterly predictable and inspires plenty of confidence. Likely to be the most popular choice amongst British buyers, the 1.6-litre dCi 130 engine promises 70.6mpg officially; the car returned just north of 50mpg under test, which is a good result considering the route and driving styles. CO2 emissions of 103g/km will leave a bill of just Ј20 for vehice excise duty. This all bodes well for the new and revitalised Megane. Stylish without being outlandish, and practical without being boring, the combination of a comfortable drive, a step up in quality and increased practicality means it’s every bit as good as its other hatchback rivals. Being so far away from launch in the UK, there are no equipment details or prices available. Hints of an entry cost of Ј18,000 probably wouldn’t be unrealistic, with this test model likely to cost a little over Ј20,000, which is competitive against its less interesting rivals. That might be just enough to once again make the Megane the big seller it used to be.
  • Skoda Superb SE L Executive 2.0 TDI Automatic.

    Earlier in the year, the latest Superb Estate faced one of its deadliest rivals in the large car arena, challenging Ford’s Mondeo in an estate car showdown. It beat its Blue Oval rival thanks to its spacious cabin and huge boot. Now, months later, we’ve got behind the wheel of the hatchback edition, paired to the more powerful 188bhp edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine and six-speed twin-clutch DSG automatic transmission. Here we test it in upmarket SE L Executive trim, which delivers a lengthy list of standard equipment for the Ј28,720 asking price. This more powerful edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine serves up effortless performance, but rarely feels as fast as the on paper figures suggest it should. Maybe it’s because the super refined drivetrain filters out all of the sensations of speed, instead delivering a relatively serene driving experience. The six-speed twin-clutch transmission certainly swaps cogs efficiently enough, with little evidence that the gears have been changed. The engine may sound a little clattery from cold, but soon settles down to become a distant backing track, and you’re more likely to be troubled with the road and tyre noise that permeates all too readily into the cabin. Through corners, the handling is neat and tidy, with low levels of body lean and a generous amount of grip. The steering is accurate and nicely weighted, however it isn’t as much fun to pilot as a Ford Mondeo, for example. Ride comfort is a mixed bag, and at faster motorway speeds it soaks up imperfections with ease. At lower speeds the suspension can become fidgety, transferring too many potholes and thumps into the cabin. The cabin of the Superb is a masterclass in elegant design. Swathes of soft-touch plastics are mixed with smart looking metal appliquйs, with all of the major controls exactly where you expect them. The eight-inch touchscreen navigation system is perfectly positioned and a delight to use, thanks to clearly labelled buttons alongside. The instruments are a model of clarity thanks to a white on black design, however, it’s a shame that the markings are out of tune for the UK market, showing speeds of 20, 40 and 60, when 30, 50 and 70 would be more relevant. The driving position is multi-adjustable, while the no-cost option of leather and Alcantara seats hug you nicely in place when cornering. Generous head and legroom both front and rear give the sense that you’re travelling in a vehicle altogether more upmarket, and limousinelike in flavour. Family life inevitably means lots of clutter and there’s plenty of space for oddments thanks to a large lidded tray ahead of the gear lever, a well-proportioned glovebox and door pockets, as well as an area beneath the armrest. Rearward vision is a little compromised due to a shallow rear screen, but thankfully rear parking sensors are provided on all but the entry-level model. One piece of handy buying advice is to make sure that you tick the box for the no-cost rear wiper, as the default option is that it comes without. It’s at the business end where the Superb plays its biggest trump card, with a boot capacity of 625 litres that is larger than any other similarly sized car on the road.
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