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SsangYong Actyon

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SsangYong Actyon - information: SsangYong Actyon is a very good car, that was released by "SsangYong" company. We collected the best 9 photos of SsangYong Actyon on this page.

Brand Name SsangYong
Model SsangYong Actyon
Number of views 111626 views
Model's Rate 7.6 out of 10
Number of images 9 images
Interesting News
  • Tuono V4 1100 RR.

    The venerable Tuono’s front end has been revised to offer better wind protection and has, at the same time, been made to shed 1.5 kg. The seat height has been lowered by 15 mm and the handlebars are new too. Aprilia say that these small changes make the Tuono great bikes to ride.
  • THE FORGOTTEN TWIN.

    With naked bikes suddenly gaining favor with US consumers after decades of resistance, the manufacturers are tripping over themselves rushing bodywork-less bikes to the market. BMW already took advantage of its S 1000 four-cylinder platform to get into the action with its S 1000 R in 2014 , but ironically it’s already had a naked bike for years in boxer twin form. And with the R 1200 R finally getting the new-generation wasserboxer engine for 2015 (along with other upgrades), BMW has brought that model in as well to cover all its bases in the naked-bike arena. Utilizing the same DOHC, 1,170cc fl at opposed-twin powerplant that propels the latest R 1200 GS/GS Adventure, RT, and new RS model, the R 1200 R makes full use of the claimed 125 hp at 7,750 rpm and 92 footpounds of torque at 6,500 rpm. In fact, the R 1200 R is actually claimed to have slightly better torque at low rpm than the GS/GS Adventure and RT because of its different airbox and muffl er setup to work with the R’s naked styling. Add to that reduced weight to push around (the claimed curb weight of the R is 508 pounds, while the GS and GS Adventure weigh 525 and 573 pounds, respectively, and the RT scales in at 604 pounds) and you have the makings of a much livelier boxer twin. The new R 1200 R retains the standard ASC (Automatic Stability Control) system combining traction control and ABS, but it now includes two riding modes, Road and Rain, with Rain mode obviously tailoring the throttle response, power, and ASC for slippery conditions. There’s an optional Ride Modes Pro that employs an internal inertial motion sensor to offer additional Dynamic and User ride modes. Dynamic ride mode uses the lean angle sensor to tailor the traction control much better than the standard ASC and allows the throttle response to be much more direct, while User mode allows custom setup of the ride mode using any of the various parameters. For 2015, the R 1200 R gets a new tubular steel frame that jettisons front of the engine), with the Paralever single-sided swingarm rear suspension returning. Optional ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment) that allows tool-less spring preload and damping adjustments returns with the addition of the latest-generation Dynamic ESA that uses the aforementioned inertial motion sensor and a linear potentiometer on the shock to change damping at both ends automatically according to riding conditions. Dual 320mm discs and Brembo four-piston calipers handle braking duties up front, with a single 276mm disc and two-piston fl oating caliper out back. The R (in stock form, at least) is apparently aimed toward shorter riders, as not only was I able to easily put both feet fl at on the ground with my 30-inch inseam despite the listed 31-inch seat height, but legroom felt a bit cramped. Add the seemingly tall perch of the tapered aluminum conventional handlebar, and we thought perhaps our testbike might have been fitted with the accessory shorter seat (29.9 inches) by mistake, but it wasn’t. Anyone around 5-foot-7 or taller will likely want to fit the accessory “high rider’s” seat (32.3 inches) or “sport rider’s” seat (33 inches). There’s no doubt that the R model boxer has livelier acceleration than any of its other R 1200 series counterparts, a likely by-product of its lesser heft. The usual manageable grunt right off idle permits effortlessly rapid takeoffs from a stoplight, and there’s plenty of midrange punch to easily dart past traffic on the road or highway. Even in its latest-generation guise, the boxer doesn’t pretend to be a twin-cylinder superbike, so while the engine continues to make good power on up near its 8,000-rpm redline, it’s not as exciting as, say, Yamaha’s FZ-09 triple-but it does get the job done effi- ciently with little fuss. Throttle response was smooth and amiable in the Road setting (smooth enough that the muted response of the Rain mode isn’t necessary in our opinion); our test unit wasn’t equipped with the Riding Mode Pro option, so we weren’t able to experience the “direct” throttle response of the Dynamic mode. Our R model came equipped with the Dynamic ESA option, and we found it to work well at keeping the chassis composed during acceleration and braking while offering reasonable compliance on the highway. We’ve never been big fans of the Telelever front end because of the numb feedback it gives during corner entry, and there’s a definite improvement in front-end feel with the conventional inverted fork on the new R. Our only gripe would be some harshness over sharp-edged bumps in the Dynamic setting, which isn’t present in the Road damping setting. Steering is delightfully nimble yet stable and neutral, allowing quick line changes or traffic avoidance maneuvers with little effort. There’s also a decent amount of ground clearance, even with the standard centerstand. Braking from the ABS-equipped (which can be switched off) system is strong and responsive, hauling down the R easily with no drama. Aiding in that lack of drama was our R model’s Gear Shift Assistant Pro feature that allows clutchless downshifts as well as upshifts, permitting you to rapid-fire down through the gears without worrying about throttle blipping. And thankfully the version on the boxer isn’t plagued with the vague feel and action of the S 1000 unit. At $13,950 for the base version (with optional packages boosting the price to more than $17,000 ), the BMW R 1200 R certainly isn’t for the average naked-bike rider. It’s obviously not the most powerful, the most stylish, or the most economical machine in the class. But if you love that boxer twin power and handling along with a good dose of modern technology in a roadster design, the R 1200 R is certainly worth a look.
  • China the key to Avista’s future.

    THE future of Buick’s gorgeous Avista concept - and a Holdenbadged version - lies in two extra doors, according to General Motors insiders Wheels spoke to following the car’s Detroit motor show debut. Sources confirmed that a model of a four-door version exists in the GM styling studio and is under serious consideration following its overwhelmingly positive reaction as the star of the show. GM has started work on making a business case for building the car, and a Holden-badged version - including a higher-output HSV model - could be in the mix. GM sources hint the production Avista would likely end up being a four-door coupe designed as a more affordable rival to the Mercedes-Benz CLS, BMW 6 Series Gran Coupe and Audi A7 Sportback. While Buick last year showed off a four-door concept - the Australian-designed Avenir - the four-door Avista coupe would be smaller and sleeker, with more emphasis on proportions and design than rear seat space. The challenge for securing an Avista business case is ensuring enough global demand, and once again right-hand drive production is the big question mark. In the global automotive game, Buick (which sells only in China and North America) tends to fly under the radar. But with sales of 1.25 million vehicles last year - the highest in Buick’s 112 years - it is GM’s second best-selling brand worldwide after Chevrolet. Put that down to China, where it’s the country’s number two brand. China accounts for about 80 percent of total Buick sales, and therefore holds the key to any decision to produce Avista. Although Chinese consumers do not currently buy coupes in significant numbers, Buick and GMC vice-president Duncan Aldred doesn’t necessarily see that as a roadblock to Avista getting the green light for production. “I think we’ve earned the right to have the halo car in the Buick range,” Aldred says. “We’re the premium mainstream brand in China, and there’s great value in us continuing to stretch the brand upwards, even though it may not be massive volume.” “China is important to any Buick,” admits GM design chief Ed Welburn, who says GM’s Chinese product planners have seen the car. While China is now a massive SUV market, Welburn makes the point that Chinese consumers suddenly switched from buying sedans three years ago. “A coupe might be the next big thing.” The Avista concept is based on a mash-up of GM Alpha and Omega components, sharing the Alpha-based Chevrolet Camaro coupe’s 2811mm wheelbase and with nearly identical front and rear tracks. Under the bonnet is a 3.0-litre V6 driving the rear wheels through an eight-speed automatic transmission. It’s the same engine used in the Cadillac CT6. “It’s buildable,” says Cadillac chief engineer Dave Leone. “The business case is the issue.” What helps the business case is that the production version would be built using GM’s Alpha architecture, which underpins Cadillac’s ATS and CTS as well as Camaro. Alpha means the car would not only share components that are already produced in volume, but a number of different variants of the car could also easily be configured. The Avista’s engine bay, for example, will accept GM’s 2.0-litre turbocharged four, and while the 6.2-litre V8 can also be fitted into Alpha, sources say the Avista’s underbonnet layout has not been protected for the larger engine. The eight-speed auto can be swapped for a six-speed manual, and it can be built with all-wheel drive as well as rear-drive. Importantly, it can be built in right-hand drive. That means GM could easily build Opel, Vauxhall and Holden versions of the car, offering powertrains that suit each market, along with different equipment levels and different chassis set-ups. “Think of all the performance hardware in the parts bin,” teases Welburn. An HSV Avista with all-wheel drive and the 346kW, twin-turbo 3.6-litre V6 from the Cadillac ATS-V? It’s possible. “That’s just a good business model,” says Aldred of selling Avista as an Opel. “If you can build a vehicle that’s competing in Europe, North America and China, you’ve pretty much got it covered.” And what about Holden? “Holden’s in the mix,” confirms Aldred, a Brit who was managing director of Vauxhall before taking on the Buick/GMC job, so knows GM’s Australian subsidiary well. “We could do right-hand drive. That investment’s done, though there is an additional expense. I guess you’ve gotta see if there is enough volume in the UK with Vauxhall.” Avista has a lot of enthusiastic supporters inside GM. “It’s gorgeous,” gushed GM chairman and CEO Mary Barra. “I said to Mark [Reuss], ‘We have to find a way of doing this one’.” Lower sales expectations and premium margins mean a fourdoor coupe is perhaps a safer choice as a Buick halo car than a large sedan like the Avenir, which would have had to compete with everything from an S-Class Benz to Hyundai’s new Genesis G90. Even so, GM product planners are wary of committing investment dollars to this notoriously fickle segment. And that’s why there’s a strong faction inside GM that wants to stretch Avista’s wheelbase slightly and add a couple of doors.
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