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Thiokol Spryte 1201

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Thiokol Spryte 1201 - information: Thiokol Spryte 1201 is a very good car, that was released by "Thiokol" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Thiokol Spryte 1201 on this page.

Brand Name Thiokol
Model Thiokol Spryte 1201
Number of views 13578 views
Model's Rate 5.7 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • 2017 Suzuki SV650.

    Suzuki has announced that the ever-popular SV650 will make its offi- cial return to the States next year, this after Suzuki saw just intermittent success with its Gladius and SFV650 models. Introduced as an early-release 2017 model, the new SV features 140 redesigned components for both the engine and chassis and weighs around 15 pounds less than the outgoing SFV while producing a claimed 75 hp (versus 71 hp for the SFV). Specific changes to the engine include new pistons with resin-coated skirts, a new exhaust system, and staggered intake funnels that improve midrange performance. The bike also features Suzuki’s one-push easystart system, as well as a low-rpm assist mode, which activates the bike’s idle speed control valve at low engine revs to assist with leaving a stop. On the chassis side, Suzuki’s goal was to make the bike more compact and narrow, which it’s accomplished with updates to the frame and changes to the tank that reduce overall tank width by just over 2.5 inches. The new SV650 will be available early summer 2016.
  • Audace.

    The Audace with its 121-Nm 1,400-cc V-twin engine is Moto Guzzi’s interpretation of a muscle bike. Ostentatious, muscular and fierce, the Moto Guzzi Audace can be picked out immediately by its front end, made stylistically lighter by the circular headlight unit and the carbon mudguard mounted on a fork without any telescope covering.
  • Renault Megane.

    The Renault Megane used to be the second best-selling family hatchback in Europe, behind only the all-conquering Volkswagen Golf, but that was ten years ago and things haven’t gone awfully well for the car since then. The latest model has a lot of work to do. Rather than rehashing the existing model, Renault has splashed the cash to create an all-new Megane, although it does share some of its underpinnings with the new Espace and Talisman - both cars we won’t be getting here in the UK. The styling is unlike anything we’ve seen from Renault before, with dramatic light signatures front and rear, while a Renault diamond the size of a dinner plate adorns the grille to remind everybody what it is that you’re driving. It’s the widest car in its class, but retains at least some traditional French design flair to mask the bulk. It’s all very different from the me-too euro-hatchbacks from some other manufacturers. The interior has had similar levels of effort put in, the highlight being an 8.7-inch tablet-like touchscreen mounted centrally, that operates most functions of the car. There’s pleasant chrome surrounds to many parts, and the instrument binnacle houses a hi-tech screen that allows you to choose your own speedometer style. It doesn’t quite gel together though. The surround for the touchscreen feels cheap, and the screen itself is often slow to respond, even to multiple jabs to kick it in to action. It’s also likely to be a cost-option on all but the highest specification, the rest making do with a smaller horizontal screen. The rest of the cabin is pleasant enough, with adjustable ambient lighting adding a touch of class to proceedings. Large door bins take a good-sized bottle, and there’s a bigger boot than you’ll find in the Golf, Astra or Focus. Some minor issues could probably be forgiven on this early model though - the UK won’t be getting Megane until the middle of the year, so there’s plenty of time to tackle any snags. What won’t need fixing is the drive. The trusty 1.6-litre diesel engine found across the Renault range makes another appearance here, but it’s a reasonably refined unit that provides linear power delivery and excellent economy. Performance is acceptable too, with the 0-62mph dash taking exactly ten seconds, while in-gear acceleration is strong thanks to 236ft lb of torque. Ride quality is as good as you expect from a French car, without sacrificing any handling prowess. It’s not engaging like a Focus, but it’s got plenty of grip, is utterly predictable and inspires plenty of confidence. Likely to be the most popular choice amongst British buyers, the 1.6-litre dCi 130 engine promises 70.6mpg officially; the car returned just north of 50mpg under test, which is a good result considering the route and driving styles. CO2 emissions of 103g/km will leave a bill of just Ј20 for vehice excise duty. This all bodes well for the new and revitalised Megane. Stylish without being outlandish, and practical without being boring, the combination of a comfortable drive, a step up in quality and increased practicality means it’s every bit as good as its other hatchback rivals. Being so far away from launch in the UK, there are no equipment details or prices available. Hints of an entry cost of Ј18,000 probably wouldn’t be unrealistic, with this test model likely to cost a little over Ј20,000, which is competitive against its less interesting rivals. That might be just enough to once again make the Megane the big seller it used to be.
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