World Encyclopedia of Cars
The best old cars, news and reviews about old cars. Stay in touch!

Thornycroft Nubian

All Thornycroft Photos

Thornycroft Nubian - information: Thornycroft Nubian is a very good car, that was released by "Thornycroft" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Thornycroft Nubian on this page.

Brand Name Thornycroft
Model Thornycroft Nubian
Number of views 19954 views
Model's Rate 7.8 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • Vauxhall Viva SE 1.0i ecoFLEX.

    It’s been a few months since the baby Viva went on sale, but because there weren’t any 99g/km ecoFLEX editions available to drive at the car’s launch, we have had to wait until now to get our hands on one. Reviving a legendary name from the past, the Viva wears the Opel Karl nameplate in Europe and replaces the boxy Agila at the bottom of the Vauxhall line-up. Just one sub-100g/km edition is offered, and that’s this entry-level SE edition, however, it comes pretty well kitted out for the cash, with big car features like cruise control, Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity and a lane departure warning system. It’s a shame that you’ll need to cough up extra to get DAB digital radio and a space saver spare wheel, though. It’s a cute looking car, with an appearance that’s a whole lot more appealing than its predecessor. Inside, the dashboard is attractively styled, and though it’s awash with hard plastics, Vauxhall’s designers have managed to make the surfaces look good, as well as giving them a sturdy, built-to-last feel. All of the controls are logically arranged high up on the dashboard, and the white on black instruments are easy to read. The driving position is pretty good, despite the steering wheel only being adjustable for rake and not reach, with the seats delivering decent comfort levels. Headroom both front and rear is expansive and surprisingly considering its tiny footprint, there’s more than enough space in the back to carry a couple of passengers, with knee and legroom generous. There’s seatbelts for three back there, but because the Viva is relatively narrow, any middle seat passenger will soon become close friends with the other participants. Boot space is on the small side compared to other city car rivals, not helped by a high sill to haul luggage over, but can be opened up further by tipping the rear seats down almost flat. With most Vivas spending their time in the urban sprawl, there’s sufficient performance to keep up with other traffic. The little 74bhp 1.0-litre three-cylinder engine is quiet and only becomes more raucous when you have your right foot to the floor. The gearbox is smooth and easy to slide in and out of gear, all helped by a light clutch. Surprisingly there’s no stop-start technology fitted to this car - maybe Vauxhall engineers are keeping it up their sleeves for a later, more efficient version. At motorway speeds, the baby Viva is more than capable of cutting it in the outside lane, with decent mid- and upper-range zip, though you’ll want to invest in a set of ear defenders, as there’s more road noise than is ideal, and you’ll hear some wind fluffing from around the front end. Handling is generally neat and tidy, albeit with a modicum of lean when cornering. There’s decent grip, however, and while the steering doesn’t serve up an enormous amount of feel, it’s alright, and better around town than on the open road. Thanks to its compact size, it’s easily manoeuvrable. One of the biggest areas to impress is in ride comfort, with an absorbent suspension that soaks up even the scruffiest of surfaces with great maturity and ease.
  • Skoda Superb SE L Executive 2.0 TDI Automatic.

    Earlier in the year, the latest Superb Estate faced one of its deadliest rivals in the large car arena, challenging Ford’s Mondeo in an estate car showdown. It beat its Blue Oval rival thanks to its spacious cabin and huge boot. Now, months later, we’ve got behind the wheel of the hatchback edition, paired to the more powerful 188bhp edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine and six-speed twin-clutch DSG automatic transmission. Here we test it in upmarket SE L Executive trim, which delivers a lengthy list of standard equipment for the Ј28,720 asking price. This more powerful edition of the 2.0-litre TDI engine serves up effortless performance, but rarely feels as fast as the on paper figures suggest it should. Maybe it’s because the super refined drivetrain filters out all of the sensations of speed, instead delivering a relatively serene driving experience. The six-speed twin-clutch transmission certainly swaps cogs efficiently enough, with little evidence that the gears have been changed. The engine may sound a little clattery from cold, but soon settles down to become a distant backing track, and you’re more likely to be troubled with the road and tyre noise that permeates all too readily into the cabin. Through corners, the handling is neat and tidy, with low levels of body lean and a generous amount of grip. The steering is accurate and nicely weighted, however it isn’t as much fun to pilot as a Ford Mondeo, for example. Ride comfort is a mixed bag, and at faster motorway speeds it soaks up imperfections with ease. At lower speeds the suspension can become fidgety, transferring too many potholes and thumps into the cabin. The cabin of the Superb is a masterclass in elegant design. Swathes of soft-touch plastics are mixed with smart looking metal appliquйs, with all of the major controls exactly where you expect them. The eight-inch touchscreen navigation system is perfectly positioned and a delight to use, thanks to clearly labelled buttons alongside. The instruments are a model of clarity thanks to a white on black design, however, it’s a shame that the markings are out of tune for the UK market, showing speeds of 20, 40 and 60, when 30, 50 and 70 would be more relevant. The driving position is multi-adjustable, while the no-cost option of leather and Alcantara seats hug you nicely in place when cornering. Generous head and legroom both front and rear give the sense that you’re travelling in a vehicle altogether more upmarket, and limousinelike in flavour. Family life inevitably means lots of clutter and there’s plenty of space for oddments thanks to a large lidded tray ahead of the gear lever, a well-proportioned glovebox and door pockets, as well as an area beneath the armrest. Rearward vision is a little compromised due to a shallow rear screen, but thankfully rear parking sensors are provided on all but the entry-level model. One piece of handy buying advice is to make sure that you tick the box for the no-cost rear wiper, as the default option is that it comes without. It’s at the business end where the Superb plays its biggest trump card, with a boot capacity of 625 litres that is larger than any other similarly sized car on the road.
  • Renault Megane.

    The Renault Megane used to be the second best-selling family hatchback in Europe, behind only the all-conquering Volkswagen Golf, but that was ten years ago and things haven’t gone awfully well for the car since then. The latest model has a lot of work to do. Rather than rehashing the existing model, Renault has splashed the cash to create an all-new Megane, although it does share some of its underpinnings with the new Espace and Talisman - both cars we won’t be getting here in the UK. The styling is unlike anything we’ve seen from Renault before, with dramatic light signatures front and rear, while a Renault diamond the size of a dinner plate adorns the grille to remind everybody what it is that you’re driving. It’s the widest car in its class, but retains at least some traditional French design flair to mask the bulk. It’s all very different from the me-too euro-hatchbacks from some other manufacturers. The interior has had similar levels of effort put in, the highlight being an 8.7-inch tablet-like touchscreen mounted centrally, that operates most functions of the car. There’s pleasant chrome surrounds to many parts, and the instrument binnacle houses a hi-tech screen that allows you to choose your own speedometer style. It doesn’t quite gel together though. The surround for the touchscreen feels cheap, and the screen itself is often slow to respond, even to multiple jabs to kick it in to action. It’s also likely to be a cost-option on all but the highest specification, the rest making do with a smaller horizontal screen. The rest of the cabin is pleasant enough, with adjustable ambient lighting adding a touch of class to proceedings. Large door bins take a good-sized bottle, and there’s a bigger boot than you’ll find in the Golf, Astra or Focus. Some minor issues could probably be forgiven on this early model though - the UK won’t be getting Megane until the middle of the year, so there’s plenty of time to tackle any snags. What won’t need fixing is the drive. The trusty 1.6-litre diesel engine found across the Renault range makes another appearance here, but it’s a reasonably refined unit that provides linear power delivery and excellent economy. Performance is acceptable too, with the 0-62mph dash taking exactly ten seconds, while in-gear acceleration is strong thanks to 236ft lb of torque. Ride quality is as good as you expect from a French car, without sacrificing any handling prowess. It’s not engaging like a Focus, but it’s got plenty of grip, is utterly predictable and inspires plenty of confidence. Likely to be the most popular choice amongst British buyers, the 1.6-litre dCi 130 engine promises 70.6mpg officially; the car returned just north of 50mpg under test, which is a good result considering the route and driving styles. CO2 emissions of 103g/km will leave a bill of just Ј20 for vehice excise duty. This all bodes well for the new and revitalised Megane. Stylish without being outlandish, and practical without being boring, the combination of a comfortable drive, a step up in quality and increased practicality means it’s every bit as good as its other hatchback rivals. Being so far away from launch in the UK, there are no equipment details or prices available. Hints of an entry cost of Ј18,000 probably wouldn’t be unrealistic, with this test model likely to cost a little over Ј20,000, which is competitive against its less interesting rivals. That might be just enough to once again make the Megane the big seller it used to be.
Top Thornycroft models
Popular Searches
World Encyclopedia of Cars
Copyright 2015. All rights under protection.