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Tofas Murat 131 Dògan

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Tofas Murat 131 Dògan - information: Tofas Murat 131 Dògan is a very good car, that was released by "Tofas" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Tofas Murat 131 Dògan on this page.

Brand Name Tofas
Model Tofas Murat 131 Dògan
Number of views 90448 views
Model's Rate 9.4 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • SCRAMBLER CLASSIC.

    Ducati’s new Scrambler range is a trip down memory lane. A modern tribute to the care-free, halcyon days of the original Scrambler, which was born in 1962. Born free, in fact, as is engraved on the fuel cap. Sweet touches like that bring a smile to my face and encourage me to mentally unshackle from the putrid and mayhem filled realities of the so-called modern world. The Scrambler Classic is the machine to do it on. So easy to ride. Easy on the eye. Comfortable. Inspiring in a fashion that is not bent towards velocity. You don’t have to try and be fast on one. Just take it easy, dude, enjoy the ride and pass it on. The new Scrambler has an extra cylinder and a fair bit more capacity over its distant predecessor, using the reliable and effervescent 803cc air-cooled Desmo two-valve engine. The motor yields an excellent mix of easily accessible power and consistent torque that is further bolstered by well matched gearbox ratios. The bike is ultra-narrow and low in the seat, and all controls are easy to use and light to the touch, making it an attractive prospect to whatever your gender. With a slight weight of 170kg to lug, the Scrambler is certainly a zesty little number, but not intimidating. That’s what its all about, man. The diamond stitched and suitably well-used couch brown seat, spoked wheels, brushed aluminium tank covers and cow-horn ‘bars scream vintage and do a good job of hiding the machine’s actual modernity. If you look more closely there are other nice touches, like the aluminium guards, machined engine covers and tidy exhaust plumbing. It is touted as a fashion and lifestyle statement, again like its daddy, and is effective in this regard. Ducati know this, of course, and have an entire wardrobe available pour femme et homme. Handling is pretty darn good. The 18in front and relatively high profile tyres tend to slow direction changes, but this is well compensated by the handlebars, light weight and general rider ergonomics. It’s a willing performer in the curves too, with good clearance and confident corner tracking. The relatively soft suspension is not complex and provides decent stroke for absorbing corrugations. The overall comfort helps alleviate some of the effects of “hanging out in the wind” a bit, too. Brakes, which feature the miracle of ABS and “radial” caliper mounting, are effective but feel wooden, like old Brembos do. The dash is suitably sparse, but a disappointment - there is nothing analogue in it and it is not easily read, which is a shame. But in keeping with the peace, love and good happiness stuff theme, I can forgive and even forget. Overall, the Scrambler is a great little machine that is rewarding as much as it is pleasing to ride. Just hop on and go - it’s that easy. It is destined to be a hit with many people seeking a bike that is functional and places the rider in a more restful universe.
  • MT-10.

    Probably the most eye-catching and exciting motorcycle at EICMA 2015, the sharp and edgy MT-10 is actually a naked version of Yamaha’s awesome YZF R1. It is powered by a reworked 998-cc in-line four with the crossplane crankshaft. Output figures remain shrouded in mystery, unfortunately. The MT-10, like a host of other motorcycles across manufacturers, gets the benefit of ride-by-wire, which is further shored up with selectable power modes, traction control and so on. However, the inertial measurement units of the range-topping R1 will not be seen in the electronics package of the MT-10. Although the bike doesn’t look like it’s headed for India anytime soon, it will surely catch a whole lot of eyeballs and swing them Yamaha’s way if the Indian arm of the MotoGP world championship winning manufacturer do decide to take the bold step.
  • Leoncino.

    Given how popular the scrambler look has become of late, it is of little surprise that Benelli have resurrected the Leoncino name with this scrambler-esque motorbike. This stylised bike even features the lion of Pesaro (Benelli’s home town) on the front mudguard, a throwback to the original bike that bore the same name. Power comes from a totally new liquid-cooled four-valve DOHC 500-cc twin-cylinder engine that has an output rating of 47.6 PS at 8,500 RPM and 45 Nm of maximum twist force at 4,500 RPM. Transmission is, of course, via a six-speed gearbox. The Leoncino’s chassis comprises the trademark Benelli trellis; the front end with 50-mm USD forks while the at the rear there is an offset monoshock with adjustment for spring preload and hydraulic rebound damping. Stopping power comes from a pair of 320-mm dia rotors with radial four-piston callipers and a single 260-mm dia rotor with twin-piston callipers. For those of you who couldn’t go to EICMA, this wonderful looking machine will also grace the Benelli stall at the forthcoming Auto Expo next February according to the company’s top management.
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