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Triumph 1050 Speed Triple

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Triumph 1050 Speed Triple - information: Triumph 1050 Speed Triple is a very good car, that was released by "Triumph" company. We collected the best 10 photos of Triumph 1050 Speed Triple on this page.

Brand Name Triumph
Model Triumph 1050 Speed Triple
Number of views 95971 views
Model's Rate 5.9 out of 10
Number of images 10 images
Interesting News
  • TOYOTA LAND CRUISER INVINCIBLE 2.8 D-4D AUTOMATIC.

    When you’ve got a vehicle in your lineup as legendary as the Land Cruiser, the key to success is continuous evolution. Small improvements dotted throughout the model’s life will ensure that you have something new for customers that change their car regularly. This approach, Toyota has got down to a fine art, with the latest car benefiting from a brand new 174bhp 2.8-litre D-4D engine and six-speed automatic transmission that meets the latest Euro-6 emissions regulations. Fuel economy and CO2 emissions are both improved - up by 3.3mpg and down by 19g/km, respectively - but power and torque figures are disappointingly less than before. But despite the power cut, the on-road driving experience is enhanced compared to before. Performance is adequate, and while the engine is chattery from cold, it settles down a fair bit when warmed through. You’ll still hear it, especially when you floor the throttle, but at motorway speeds it settles down to a low roar, while road and wind noise are kept reasonably well in check. There’s a vagueness to the steering, however, cornering prowess is pretty good, with low levels of lean through bends, and generous amounts of grip. A choice of ‘comfort’ or ‘sport’ modes for the suspension means that things get too bouncy and wallowy in the former setting, but nicely firmed up in the latter, with all but the deepest of potholes and severest of undulations soaked up well, making the Sport mode the setting of choice for us. Off road, show the Land Cruiser a muddy field or a heavily rutted track and it’ll eat it up and spit it out - its mug plugging prowess far exceeds its ability on the road. The interior of the Land Cruiser has been steadily improved over time, with better and better materials used along the way. The majority of the plastics are of the soft-touch variety and all of the fixtures and fittings feel like they’ve been screwed together nicely and will stand up to a lifetime’s worth of abuse. The wood trim seems outdated to us, while the steering wheel would be better if it was covered entirely in leather, rather than having the slippery feel of the wood. Controls for the four-wheel-drive system dominate the centre console, with all of the buttons logically arranged up high on the dashboard. The navigation screen is ideally placed and easy to use, with clear and colourful graphics. Visibility is generally good all around the car thanks to its square shape and good sized windows, though the rear wiper is next to useless due to the small area that it wipes. Park it in tight spaces and you’ll curse the side opening tailgate, and wish that it had a more conventional up and over arrangement. The space available is also smaller than most rivals, despite the vehicle’s obvious bulk. Oddment space is well catered for thanks to a large cubby hole underneath the armrest, decently sized door pockets and glovebox, and a pair of cupholders. Even with a sunroof fitted, headroom is pretty good both front and rear, and back seat passengers will be impressed by the amount of knee room. The usual caveats apply when it comes to using the sixth and seventh seat in the back, with passengers likely to want the journey to be as short as possible, unless they’re a youngster.
  • DUCATI DIAVEL RED.

    Got issues? Anger management, racing crouch Tourette’s, grumpier as the days pass? Perhaps Ducati have the panacea for those ills and others in the form of the Diavel. The hulking, fat and stretched alleged cruiser from Bologna is much more than a parts bin Frankenstein. Hang on to what’s left of your soul because this devil is captivating enough to be almost anyone’s Faustian bargain. Why? Be comforted by the beckoning seat that embraces your buttocks delightfully and holds you low and squarely in genuine comfort. Find your new foot position. Fire up the Testastretta 11° engine, which was surely made in heaven and roll along on the sled-like long wheelbase chassis, monster brakes and ultra-fat rear hoop. Look mean. Sound mean. Be mean. Or be a show pony, as it matters not - the Diavel will not be fazed. I was sceptical at first, but I’m now a wild-eyed disciple. How? Let the magnificent engine do the work. From the bottom rung of the ladder to the top, it does not cease providing chunky, wieldy torque and still thirsts to be spun up - a gem of an engine that is aided with sublime fuelling and excellent throttle reaction. Diavel weight distribution, which is lardy for a duck, and a lengthy wheelbase ensures stability is a priority, however, the ergonomics and ‘bars assist in defying physics with surprisingly relaxed direction changes. Top shelf suspension is well suited, enhancing the solid geometry and includes on-the-fly rear adjustment. Stopping is a non-issue, the superbike specification brakes are truly splendid, offering a deftness of touch that is inspiring. Styling is debatable I reckon, but your call, and who cares when you can bank over enough to scrape your boots in hateful salute to the authorities and all the while the beast begs for more? Just change your style from hard braking late into bends and body slamming the bike down, to increasing the radii and rolling around that big back tyre. The demeanour of the bike, like Beelzebub himself, is misleading as it appeases the senses, relaxes and makes you chill, but will get you maniacal from the pleasures. It is definitely a faster point to point machine than it might appear. The technology, love or hate it, is there in spades and includes ride-by-wire throttle, several electronic safety systems, multi-modes to corral the Testastretta wallop and dual displays for God knows why. A mortal sin is the keyless ignition - a nonsense. Another is machine width, which kind of made it impossible to efficiently lane split. The Diavel is a new, perhaps controversial, branch on Ducati’s evolutionary tree, but a significant one. The non-compromising approach by the designers and engineers has made a sophisticated and capable machine that needs to be ridden to be properly appreciated. It will not be to everyone’s liking, but the lure of the dark side, which is now available in traditional red for the Australian market, may be the elixir for many evils. God bless the Diavel?
  • BIG BIKE VS. SMALL BIKE.

    We see it quite often at the racetrack, especially in club races where classes are mixed: Rider on small bike passes rider on big bike in seemingly every corner, only to be passed back right away on the next straight. Even if the power difference is not that great between the two bikes, the contrast between corner speed and straightaway speed of the two bikes becomes magnified as each bike is ridden to maximize its advantages. The reality of the situation is that the outright maximum cornering speed between any two bikes is not that significantly different, provided both are on similar tires. If the tires are similar, both bikes should be capable of the same lateral acceleration (limited by the friction coefficient of the tires) and corner speed. Why do we see such a contrast in how the bikes are ridden? On an underpowered bike, the quickest way around the track is to maximize corner speed, in turn getting onto each straight with as much speed as possible. This is accomplished by completing the corner with as large an arc as possible, which converts lateral acceleration into maximum corner speed. For a typical single-radius corner, this means entering as wide as possible to maximize entry speed, turning in to the apex with little trail- braking, and keeping the bike at maximum lean with a constant radius until the very exit of the corner. In contrast, the quickest lap times on a more powerful bike are usually found by maximizing acceleration onto each straight and taking advantage of that power; this is achieved by sacrificing some corner speed to pick the bike up and apply the throttle earlier at the exit. For that same single-radius corner, this means a tighter entry, more trail-braking to a slightly later apex, with a tighter arc and less corner speed to get the bike up off the side of the tire as quickly as possible. As we found out in our displacement test last year where we compared the Yamaha YZF-R6, Suzuki GSX-R750, and Kawasaki ZX-10R, it’s not so much that the smaller bikes have a handling advantage over the bigger bikes but rather it’s how each bike is ridden to play to its strength or weakness in the power department. Using data from our AiM Solo GPS lap timer, we could see differences in line and cornering speeds between the three bikes, just as you would expect given the horsepower of each. While a few horsepower here or there might not seem like it should impact line choice signifi- cantly, in practice even a small difference can significantly change how a particular corner or series of corners is negotiated. And the contrast between a lightweight bike and a literbike can be astonishing: We’ve encountered certain corners where the entry line is several feet different on an SV650 than it is on a 1000, for an example. Finding the optimum line to match the power of your bike does require some experimentation. The wide radius and high corner speed that less powerful bikes require typically brings with it a higher risk of a high-side crash in the middle of the corner just as the throttle is opened, and the safer option is to start with the tighter entry and lower corner speed of the big-bike line and work from there, adding more corner speed and a wider entry with practice. If you are looking at sector times on data, don’t forget to factor in any time gained or lost on the succeeding straight, which may or may not offset time saved in the corner itself. Given the contrast in lines between different bikes, the key point to remember is that the optimum line for your bike may be very different from the bike in front of you, and it’s quite often a mistake to blindly follow another rider at the track. Even if you are riding the same model of bike, the power difference may be enough that you can take advantage of a different line to be quicker, and that line may work to a further advantage when it comes time to make a pass. When you ride at the track, what bike you are on will at least in part determine what lines you should be taking, and you should try different options with that in mind. And if you change bikes and move to a more or less powerful machine- or even make modifications to the same bike for more power-know that the lines you had been using for years might need to be altered appropriately.
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