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Vauxhall 30/98

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Vauxhall 30/98 - information: Vauxhall 30/98 is a very good car, that was released by "Vauxhall" company. We collected the best 8 photos of Vauxhall 30/98 on this page.

Brand Name Vauxhall
Model Vauxhall 30/98
Number of views 92774 views
Model's Rate 7.2 out of 10
Number of images 8 images
Interesting News
  • El Dorado.

    The El Dorado is Moto Guzzi’s vintage cruiser and features a 1,400-cc V-twin, ride-by-wire technology and Moto Guzzi’s media platform that allows smart phones to be connected to the bike.
  • Kia Optima.

    Anyone asked to pen an obituary for the outgoing Kia Optima would probably write something like "nice-looking car; shame about the CO2 emissions, refinement and trim quality". Which is pretty much what customers said, and a good starting point for Kia when getting down to work on the new one. But that's not all. For a while, Kia has been dragging its feet in the areas of connectivity and advanced driver assistance features. Both of those have also been addressed. And there will be greater choice, with sportier-looking GT-Line versions for the first time. The Optima's good looks have been further polished, and there's more passenger and cargo room thanks to a longer wheelbase, higher roof line and wider cockpit. For now, the UK line-up will again be diesel only, though a plug-in hybrid will be added in 2016. The diesel engine is a Euro-6 emissions compliant version of the 1.7-litre CRDi unit from the previous Optima, developing more power (139bhp instead of 134) and extra torque (251lb ft versus 240). Maximum torque arrives earlier in the rev band, too - at 1,750rpm rather than 2,000. Vitally, it also produces lower emissions - down by 14 per cent to 110g/km for the six-speed manual gearbox, and by a massive 27 per cent to 116g/km with the seven-speed twin-clutch automatic transmission, which replaces the former six-speed torque converter unit. That lowers the tax burden on company car users by three and eight bands respectively. And if that's not enough, Kia is promising greater refinement, a smoother ride and a more engaging drive. Those promises have largely been kept. It takes only a few hundred yards to appreciate the improved driveability of the revised engine (just follow the guidance of the gearshift indicator to see how much more driverfriendly it is) and its greater smoothness and more dulcet tones. With the new automatic gearbox, it's even better, and given that it raises benefit-in-kind tax by only one band over than the manual car, Kia can envisage a fair take-up. There's less wind noise (no gaps in the door seals any more, and better windscreen mountings), although the claimed improvements in road noise are surfacedependent. The same can be said for the ride, though the heavily revised suspension mostly does its job well. A relocated power steering pump makes the car a bit more adroit, too. The real joy for business users who might have to spend hours behind the wheel, however, will come from the plusher interior, more shapely seats (though the cushions might be just a bit too hard for some after a while) and more premium equipment options. A TomTom equipped navigation system with connected services will be standard, through a seven-inch screen with impressively clear graphics set at exactly the same height as the instruments. The pared-down switchgear is set lower in a horizontally orientated dash, and looks very BMW reminiscent. All versions of the Optima feature a reversing camera, dual-zone climate control, cruise control, speed limiter, power folding and heated mirrors, DAB digital radio and Bluetooth connectivity, as well as 17-inch alloy wheels, LED daytime running lights, tyre pressure monitors, and electric hand brake and hill start assist. Move up to level 3 and you get a larger eight-inch navigation screen, electric driver’s seat, heated front chairs, xenon headlights and 18-inch alloy wheels, as well as extra chrome for the exterior, half leather seats, an uprated instrument cluster, a Harmon Kardon premium sound system and LED front fog lights and rear tail light clusters. Right at the top-of-the-range, the new level 4 equipment level includes wireless mobile phone charging, a 360- degree camera system, automated parking, blind spot detection, rear cross traffic alert, a lane keeping assistant, as well as high beam assist, speed limit detection, autonomous emergency braking and adaptive cruise control. Leather upholstery is also included within the price tag, as well as ventilated front seats and heated rear outer chairs, and a panoramic glass sunroof. GT-Line versions will fall somewhere in the middle, with final specifications to be confirmed when it is launched later in 2016.
  • Nissan NP300 Navara.

    Pickups are at the brawny end of the car scene, utility vehicles that used to have a rough and ready image, and the structure and driving characteristics to match. In recent times they have become a lot more civilised, with big advances in creature comfort and road-going behaviour. The latest of the breed, Nissan’s new NP300 Navara - the NP stands for Nissan Pickup - is a very good example of how far down that road pickups have progressed. It is a big vehicle at five and a half metres long, and its elevated chassis means that you still need to be a tall, strong bloke to enter the cab with ease: it’s rather a physical upward haul for those of us more vertically challenged. But once installed it’s something of a revelation. All the controls are pleasantly weighted and you don’t need beefy muscles to drive this latest generation of Navara. It has undergone a mechanical transformation, with the rather rustic leafspring suspension of the previous model now replaced by more sophisticated coil springs, while the previous 2.5-litre dCi engine has been superseded by a more efficient 2.3-litre dCi unit with either 161 or 188bhp power outputs. Both changes bring big benefits. The new Navara has taut and tidy handling, but without undue body lean, and it also rides impressively well with some of the most cushioned comfort of any of the current crop of modern pickups. Strong performance doesn’t come with a noise penalty, and refinement is very good indeed for a vehicle of this type. Gearbox choice is six-speed manual or a seven-speed automatic transmission, and both have well-spaced ratios and a slick action. There are two body styles, the King Cab that is popular in some other markets, with shorter, rear-opening back doors and a basic bench back seat, and the Double Cab that is generally preferred here in the UK and has four full-size conventional doors and fully comfortable back seats. There is nothing rustic about interior comfort, it is on a par with a well-appointed five-seater family hatchback. It’s amply spacious and not cramped. Cabin quality has taken a quantum leap forward over the old model, with tactile materials, an elegantly styled dashboard layout and a level of fit and finish that would not disgrace a prestige-nudging saloon. Large door pockets, some well-placed central cubbyholes and a handy dashboard-top tray means there are enough places to put all your on-the-move oddments. There are five grades of trim, starting with Visia and rising through Acenta, Acenta+, N-Connecta and topping out with Tekna. All versions come with a fair level of standard kit, including Bluetooth mobile phone connectivity, electric windows, cruise control, automatic headlights, electric door mirrors, LED rear lights, and air conditioning on all four-wheel-drive models. Move up the range to Acenta trim and 16-inch alloy wheels are fitted, as well as keyless entry and start and chrome embellishments. Acenta+ versions feature 18-inch alloy wheels, climate control, rear privacy glass, reversing camera, front fog lights, leather steering wheel and gearknob, as well as heated door mirrors with power folding. In N-Connecta trim, as tested, a seven-inch touchscreen navigation system is included, and there’s DAB digital radio and Bluetooth audio streaming, while choosing Tekna versions includes leather upholstery, roof rails, LED headlights and daytime running lights, rear parking sensors, a 360 degree camera system and heated and electric driver’s seat. A rear differential lock is optional on all models except the entrylevel Visia trim, while an electric sunroof is available on Tekna versions at extra cost. The new NP300 Navara shows how far pickups have come in recent years. From the outside this is still a large, beefy workhorse, albeit one with sleeker curves than before. From the inside, and in its driving manners, you could think yourself at the wheel of an upper-crust SUV. Nissan has done a good job of significantly upping its game with this one.
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