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Volkswagen 'KdF-Wagen'

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Volkswagen 'KdF-Wagen' - information: Volkswagen 'KdF-Wagen' is a very good car, that was released by "Volkswagen" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Volkswagen 'KdF-Wagen' on this page.

Brand Name Volkswagen
Model Volkswagen 'KdF-Wagen'
Number of views 81904 views
Model's Rate 9.3 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • Renault Megane.

    The Renault Megane used to be the second best-selling family hatchback in Europe, behind only the all-conquering Volkswagen Golf, but that was ten years ago and things haven’t gone awfully well for the car since then. The latest model has a lot of work to do. Rather than rehashing the existing model, Renault has splashed the cash to create an all-new Megane, although it does share some of its underpinnings with the new Espace and Talisman - both cars we won’t be getting here in the UK. The styling is unlike anything we’ve seen from Renault before, with dramatic light signatures front and rear, while a Renault diamond the size of a dinner plate adorns the grille to remind everybody what it is that you’re driving. It’s the widest car in its class, but retains at least some traditional French design flair to mask the bulk. It’s all very different from the me-too euro-hatchbacks from some other manufacturers. The interior has had similar levels of effort put in, the highlight being an 8.7-inch tablet-like touchscreen mounted centrally, that operates most functions of the car. There’s pleasant chrome surrounds to many parts, and the instrument binnacle houses a hi-tech screen that allows you to choose your own speedometer style. It doesn’t quite gel together though. The surround for the touchscreen feels cheap, and the screen itself is often slow to respond, even to multiple jabs to kick it in to action. It’s also likely to be a cost-option on all but the highest specification, the rest making do with a smaller horizontal screen. The rest of the cabin is pleasant enough, with adjustable ambient lighting adding a touch of class to proceedings. Large door bins take a good-sized bottle, and there’s a bigger boot than you’ll find in the Golf, Astra or Focus. Some minor issues could probably be forgiven on this early model though - the UK won’t be getting Megane until the middle of the year, so there’s plenty of time to tackle any snags. What won’t need fixing is the drive. The trusty 1.6-litre diesel engine found across the Renault range makes another appearance here, but it’s a reasonably refined unit that provides linear power delivery and excellent economy. Performance is acceptable too, with the 0-62mph dash taking exactly ten seconds, while in-gear acceleration is strong thanks to 236ft lb of torque. Ride quality is as good as you expect from a French car, without sacrificing any handling prowess. It’s not engaging like a Focus, but it’s got plenty of grip, is utterly predictable and inspires plenty of confidence. Likely to be the most popular choice amongst British buyers, the 1.6-litre dCi 130 engine promises 70.6mpg officially; the car returned just north of 50mpg under test, which is a good result considering the route and driving styles. CO2 emissions of 103g/km will leave a bill of just Ј20 for vehice excise duty. This all bodes well for the new and revitalised Megane. Stylish without being outlandish, and practical without being boring, the combination of a comfortable drive, a step up in quality and increased practicality means it’s every bit as good as its other hatchback rivals. Being so far away from launch in the UK, there are no equipment details or prices available. Hints of an entry cost of Ј18,000 probably wouldn’t be unrealistic, with this test model likely to cost a little over Ј20,000, which is competitive against its less interesting rivals. That might be just enough to once again make the Megane the big seller it used to be.
  • MAKE MINE A “SUPERMID”.

    Just as it did in 2015 with the 1299 Panigale, Ducati has upped the ante in 2016 with the smaller Panigale, giving the previous 899 the same stroke measurement as the 1299 to create the new 959 Panigale. Ducati wanted to ensure that the “supermid” Panigale kept pace with its bigger brother, so it invited the world’s motorcycling media to the Circuit de la Comunitat Valenciana Ricardo Tormo in Valencia, Spain, to let us find out. Looking at the updates, they are minimal but important, with the engine’s slight increase in stroke from 57.2mm to 60.8mm (resulting in a total displacement of 955cc) necessitating a new crankshaft and connecting rods. The piston crowns are slightly different, while strict Euro 4 noise emissions standards required the fitment of a different exhaust system with dual muffl ers on the right side (thankfully absent from US models), along with ribbing on the cylinder heads and valve covers, and a different cam chain. Exhaust diameter was increased from 55mm to 60mm, while on the intake side, the 62mm oval throttle bodies now feature dual injectors. The clutch now has the slipper/assist function from the 1299 that provides lighter lever action and smoother downshifting when riding aggressively. Meanwhile, thanks to the bike employing the same cast-aluminum monocoque two-piece frame that uses the engine as a structural member, changes on the chassis side are limited to dropping the swingarm pivot 4mm for better rear-tire grip. I had spent a couple of days on an 899 Panigale last year at Circuit of The Americas in Texas, so I had a good idea of what to compare the 959 to. It didn’t take me long to realize that the 959 has power all over the 899 regardless-and not only more of it through the rpm range but smoother power, too, with fewer dips and bumps in the powerband. Ducati claims 157 hp, an increase of 9 hp from the 899’s 148 hp at 10,500 rpm, and a torque peak of 79 foot-pounds (a massive 6 foot-pound increase over the 899) at 9,000 rpm. The same Ducati electronics suite of RbW (Ride-by-Wire), DTC (Ducati Traction Control), EBC (Engine Brake Control), DQS (Ducati Quickshift), and Bosch ABS does an excellent job of keeping everything under control. With the DTC set to Level 2 in the Race riding mode, the new 959 Panigale comes off the corners well and continues pulling hard as the rpm rises. I did find, however, that you need to exercise some care in Race mode when opening the throttle midcorner, as the 959’s increased and more responsive torque can come on a little abruptly. If anything, it’s more of an annoyance, really, and it’s very manageable; you just have to be aware of it. The Sport mode throttle response is softer (with the rain-intended Wet mode softer still) and perhaps a little too soft for the track, which is why I left it in Race mode for the majority of my laps. Setting the EBC at Level 1 (the least enginebraking) with the slipper clutch was a big help under braking, allowing the rear end to step out just enough while hammering downshifts to aid but not interfere with corner entry. And speaking of braking, the feel and control provided by the Brembo M4.32 monoblock calipers and 320mm discs were outstanding, allowing trail braking deep into the corner without issues. The fully adjustable Showa 43mm Big Piston Fork offered a very solid feel in all conditions, and while the fully adjustable Sachs rear shock performed admirably, I was wishing for a slightly stiffer spring in the back to counter some squatting under acceleration. Midcorner stability was rock-solid, and although initial turn-in at speed took some effort (a likely by-product of the rear-end squat), overall steering habits were light and agile- the 959’s 430-pound wet weight surely helping matters here. The taller and wider windscreen definitely helps keep the windblast off you down long front straights better than its comparatively skimpy predecessor. And you can move around easily on the bike, aided by the same knurled footpegs found on the 1299 that grip your boots far better than the previously useless pegs found on generations of Ducatis that were only good to rest your feet on when cruising in a straight line. All told, boosting the displacement and adding subtle tweaks to its “Supermid” superquadro engine has yielded great results with the new 959 Panigale. This is the type of bike you can really feel like you’re squeezing all the potential out of, instead of the 1299 Panigale where at times you feel like you’re only along for the ride. Yeah, calling a bike with a 955cc engine a midsize machine is a bit of a stretch, but after a ride on the 959 Panigale, you probably won’t care one bit.
  • Mitsubishi Shogun 3.2 DI-D SG4 LWB Automatic.

    With the launch of the 2016 model year Shoguns, the model range has been slimmed down, with the manual gearbox variants axed. A new Euro-6 compliant engine arrives, but it’s disappointing to note that it is thirstier, emits more CO2 and produces less power. Fuel economy on the combined cycle is now 30.4mpg (previously 33.2mpg), CO2 emissions rise by 21 to a hefty 245g/km, while maximum power drops by 9bhp to 188bhp. Thankfully acceleration to 62mph is preserved, even if the top speed is reduced by one mph. The loss in performance is blamed on the changes necessary to get the Shogun to pass the more stringent Euro-6 emissions regulations. What hasn’t changed is its no-nonsense go-anywhere ability and class-leading 3,500kg towing weight. The cabin of the Shogun feels solid, and even employs a smattering of soft-touch plastics, but doesn’t feel plush, mainly down to outdated switchgear and buttons. The two-tone grey and beige trim looks good, but the wood trim gives a dated ambience. The driving position is upright, with seats that are comfortable, even if they lack sufficient rearward travel for taller and bulkier drivers, while the steering wheel only adjusts for rake and not reach. Thanks to enormous mirrors and deep windows, all round vision from the driver’s seat is excellent, handy when manoeuvring in tight spots or negotiating tough terrain when off-road. Headroom is generous front and back, even with the sunroof fitted, and legroom in the middle row is sufficient for even the tallest of passengers. Those wanting to use the rearmost chairs will need to be nimble, as in common with most seven-seat SUVs, you’ll need to do a fair bit of climbing. For carrying capacity, the Shogun is best in five-seat mode, where there’s a large, wide and deep area, with a relatively low loading sill. The side opening rear door is a pain in confined spaces, however. Oddment space is generally good, with a deep storage area under the armrest and a generously sized glovebox. Start the Shogun from cold and first impressions aren’t good. It takes an age for the engine to fire into life, and when it does there’s plenty of clatter. Moving away from rest there’s decent pace, albeit in a noisy fashion, and the sound never really disappears, even at motorway speeds. Most newer rivals employ smoother six-cylinder units to combat noise and deliver a smoother demeanour. But even if the engine was quieter, you’re still left with plenty of road and wind noise. Heavy, slow to react steering is a chore in car parks, but is alright at higher speeds. The tall sides of the Shogun inevitably mean some body lean when cornering, however, with excellent grip there’s rarely any drama. The suspension has clearly been setup for comfort rather than outright agility, soaking up all but the deepest of potholes and ruts nicely. So the Shogun is lagging behind the class best for on-road ability, but thanks to its selectable four-wheel-drive system, there isn’t another vehicle at this price point, with the same long list of equipment, that can touch it off-road in the rough stuff, and also in its.
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