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Weserhütte Sd.Kfz.261

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Weserhütte Sd.Kfz.261 - information: Weserhütte Sd.Kfz.261 is a very good car, that was released by "Weserhütte" company. We collected the best 12 photos of Weserhütte Sd.Kfz.261 on this page.

Brand Name Weserhütte
Model Weserhütte Sd.Kfz.261
Number of views 57401 views
Model's Rate 7.9 out of 10
Number of images 12 images
Interesting News
  • CUSHIONING THE RIDE.

    Citroen and Britain go back a long way. Early Citroens were first sold here just after the first World War, from 1919. They quickly endeared themselves to UK drivers, and by 1923 there were already over 23,000 of the cars on British roads. Then, for almost 40 years, from 1926 until 1965, British-made Citroens were produced in a factory in Slough. We Brits are still major consumers of Citroen products, as the third largest market in the world for the cars, behind only China, and Citroen’s native France. There is another very strong Anglo-French link. For the past 18 months, Citroen’s global boss has been a British chief executive, who also happens to be one of the most senior women in the motor industry worldwide. Linda Jackson, former managing director of Citroen UK, runs the company from its Paris base and is shaping its future with some radical plans. Briefly back in Britain on a day trip via Eurostar, she revealed her strategy for driving the company forward and restoring some of its past glory. This is, after all, the brand with some very notable models in its 96-year history, such as the pioneering Traction Avant, the unforgettable 2CV, and the remarkable Ami 6. Citroens used to be known for their quirkiness, a characteristic that had evaporated in a couple of generations of rather bland models, but has recently been revived in the much more characterful Citroen C4 Cactus, with its distinctive body-protecting airbumps. Initial plans to build 70,000 units a year has proved overly modest, and current C4 Cactus production is running at 110,000 per annum. So can we expect more of the same in future models? Yes, says Linda Jackson. Although it is hard to quantify within a largely French-speaking company, as there is no direct translation in French for the word quirky. “The success of the C4 Cactus shows you can have a vehicle that stands out and be successful with it,” comments Linda. “We have never been successful when we try to be like everyone else. It’s a gamble to be quirky, but it’s what we are doing.” Something else for which Citroen has traditionally been known is the magic carpet ride quality of its famed hydropneumatic suspension, although more recently a hydraulic system on the current C5 has sought to deliver a modern version of cushioning ride comfort. But now Citroen is on the brink of revealing a revolutionary new suspension system that Linda says will be exclusive to the French firm, and will eventually become standard right across the range. It will appear on the first new model in 2017. For the moment she is a bit cagey about the specifics, whether it will be a self-levelling design, or some kind of air suspension system, but she promises it will take Citroen back to its roots of admirable ‘floating’ ride comfort, while maintaining good body control for handling precision. “Comfort is a core value of the Citroen brand, and this is our way to recreate the benefits of the hydropneumatic set-up in a more modern, more appropriate way,” she told us. Meanwhile, she is busy with bold plans to slim the Citroen range from its current 14 different body styles to a more rational seven core designs based around three platforms. It’s intended to make the brand both leaner and fitter, and also better structured for customers to appreciate what Citroen is about. So how does a British boss go down in an iconic French company? Pretty well so far. A clear direction and plans to resurrect some of what made past Citroens special is winning her respect. They’re even quite kind about her A-level-based ability to speak French. “They say I have an accent like Jane Birkin,” says an amused Linda.
  • DUCATI MULTISTRADAS.

    When I had a chance to try out the Ducati Multistrada Pikes Peak last year I was incredibly impressed, the concept of four bikes in one is bandied about quite commonly when referring to the Multistrada and is a good reflection of the bike’s abilties. The current Multistrada is a large bike with a wet weight of 235kg - relatively light all things considered. I found the seat height tall, although it is adjustable between 825 and 845mm and couldn’t get both feet flat to the ground, but balance and low speed maneuvering were both very good. Heated grips of a chilly morning are priceless and the centre-stand is a nice touch, although probably not for everyone. They are part of the Touring pack which includes heated grips, panniers and center-stand. The Multistrada S benefits from the Ducati Skyhook Suspension and also includes a few nifty additional features like full LED headlamps, including the Ducati Cornering Lights (DCL). The braking systems on the S is also an upgraded Superbike spec system, with M50 Brembo front calipers on 330mm rotors, with a dual piston Brembo rear caliper on 265mm rotor. Also standard is the Ducati Multimedia System, which uses Bluetooth to accept incoming calls, alert you to messages and control your music, when synced with your other devices, displayed via the S’s full colour TFT display. On the bike, performance from the DVT Testastretta starts low and tractor-like, with strong but controllable low end-torque, and between 4000 and 5000rpm transforms into sportsbike like drive - in fact if you want to move off in a hurry try opening that throttle wide open, it’s exhilarating. Just keep the revs up past 4000rpm where it transitions into much smoother running, with slight vibes felt through the ‘bars, but not in an annoying fashion - you’ll have all the torque you could wish for, for rapid overtaking or acceleration. You can also modify each of the riding modes for a variety of settings, where I was using the baseline settings, which means you can have each mode set up for specific conditions, whether that’s suspension, power delivery, ABS, DTC or DWC. The Skyhook Suspension was a standout and in Sport mode with one helmet (the one rider, no luggage setting) I could feel the forks providing more support during heavy braking, only to soften as I came to a stop. Through the local twisties the Skyhook suspension proved itself, with an ability to easily absorb road irregularities. Coming into corners needs more effort than your regular sportsbike, with the Multistrada obviously carrying its weight taller and taking more input to follow your chosen path. It wasn’t the sharpest on tip in, with the standard settings - but that’s something you can tweak thanks to the level of adjustability on offer. The taller bike also means you’re leaning over further, which was easy and confidence inspiring but lends itself to coming into your corners nice and wide.You can feel that you’re relying on a system of suspension that essentially has a mind of its own but as you get used to that fact and show more confidence in the bike it only gets better and better. Part of what sets the newest Skyhook Suspension (DSS) system apart is the Evo suffix, with the previous sensors now joined by the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) which is used to provide cornering ABS to the Brembo braking system with Bosch 9ME ABS unit. This means the DSS Evo system is able to take into account your lean angle when calculating the ideal suspension response. It’s high tech and the results on the road speak for themselves. I was hoping to take my wife for a ride as a pillion to get an opinion on riding two-up, but with all my testing mid-week unfortunately couldn’t make it happen. Now it’s quite possibly you’re thinking to yourself, why spend the extra $4000 on the S model, which is a fair question. The S is the obvious choice though, as the Multistrada truly is many bikes in one, with the S offering the ultimate in suspension adjustability at the click of a few buttons. It’s the future of motorcycling and Ducati’s leading the charge.
  • RENAULT news.

    Like the Clio, the Captur also gets the Iconic Nav special edition treatment, with a two-tone exterior colour as standard, and the option to choose from six different body colour options, including Diamond Black, Ivory, Cappuccino Brown, Oyster Grey, Stone or Mercury, all paired to either a black, Ivory or Cappuccino roof. Extra equipment over and above the Dynamique S model it is based upon includes Cappuccino coloured part-leather upholstery, heated front seats, a bronze-tinted chrome interior pack, a rear parking camera, auto-dimming rear view mirror, an uprated R-Link Evolution infotainment system and 17-inch alloy wheels with Cappuccino inserts. The Captur Iconic is priced exactly the same as the Signature versions, with prices starting at Ј20,195 for the dCi 90, Ј21,195 for the dCi 90 automatic and Ј20,795 buys the more powerful dCi 110 model. This latest Captur is available to buy at Renault showrooms now.
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